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 Posted:   Mar 24, 2020 - 7:17 AM   
 By:   John B. Archibald   (Member)

Once I hear a score I like, I’m more likely to want to listen to others by the same composer.

I loved Desplat’s THE GIRL WITH THE PEARL EARRING, and bought a lot of others. But then his music just seemed to have slackened. Probably the last one I bought was THE SHAPE OF WATER, but haven’t listened to it much.

Like the poster above, I love Yared’s rejected score for TROY, but nothing else since then has appealed as much.

I loved Rachel Portman’s scores at one point, but they also seemed to have drifted into mood pieces.

Likewise, JNH’s output has gone in the same direction. (I have A HIDDEN LIFE, but haven’t heard it yet. Looking forward.)

And, lastly, Williams’ recent work just sounds tired, especially the last two STAR WARS editions, where the best themes were recycled from previous efforts.

I still like Giacchino, but not everything he puts out. And I also get a lot of Newman, even though his scores all seem to be parts of a generic, unsurprising whole.

On the other hand, I haven’t seen many movies in theaters lately; so I’m not cognizant of whatever music is in them. Most seem to be just sound walls.

Like Zimmer, whose output became mostly forgettable.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 24, 2020 - 5:48 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Hmm. There are composers whose music rarely or never sent me. There are composers whose music sent me more than others or most of the time on their own, period. There are composers whose music sent me just about always and forever. You see, even the least among them may have created one solid memorable cue that I enjoy forever. Same goes for the rest, because if the music is worth a damn it stays forever. Oh but of course I'm talking about music as composed for the whole film or just a scene or even the end credits. As for y'all who judge a composer by how well his stuff all comes out on a CD...hope I didn't take too much of your time. smile

 
 Posted:   Mar 24, 2020 - 6:16 PM   
 By:   Mr. Jack   (Member)

I thought John Ottman was a "comer" in the 90's and early 2000's, but the last scores of his I own are from the mid-00's (Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang and Superman Returns). I can't think of score he's written since that has grabbed me to the point where I want to own the album.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 24, 2020 - 6:36 PM   
 By:   peterproud   (Member)

Exactly Thor.
When I was a teenager I couldnt get warm with GoldsmithsTHE LAST RUN ...now I love it.
Same with BLUE THUNDER..now I think its quite a good score.


This is the fascinating thing about music. I read earlier in this thread that someone couldn't get into the last 20 years of Goldsmith's output. As they were released I was quite indifferent to those scores, and I really felt Goldsmith was not writing his best music during these years.

Many years later I have not only reconsidered these scores, but find many to be the scores I enjoy listening to more than his earlier works. THE EDGE, SLEEPING WITH THE ENEMY, THE VANISHING...even THE SHADOW, which I felt was a lazy score that borrowed from Elfman's Batman too much when I saw it in the theatre, has become a real favourite of mine.

Goldsmith will always be recognized for his deserved classics (POLTERGEIST, PATTON, STTMP, etc) but these later scores are still the work of a great composer and will be rediscovered and enjoyed for years....he was just that good.

 
 Posted:   Mar 25, 2020 - 10:46 AM   
 By:   TominAtl   (Member)

While he has been gone for several years now, but prior to his passing, James Horner work post Titanic just did not do anything for me, on any level, for any film, except for some of "Avatar", but even much of that was borrowed motifs and themes from his earlier work, even as far back as "Legends of the Fall".

I had felt much the same about Elfman for years, until he rocked my boat with "Wolfman" and "Alice in Wonderland" - both are outstanding.

 
 Posted:   Mar 25, 2020 - 11:24 AM   
 By:   other tallguy   (Member)

I think there are probably a lot of composers whose work I still enjoy in films but I don't like to listen to separately. Zimmer and Williams both come to mind.

I've enjoyed Williams' recent Star Wars scores but I find I only listen to one or two tracks. (Rey's Theme. Maybe Jedi Steps.)

I thought maybe I enjoyed the nostalgia of Williams that I don't get with the new stuff. But then I dug up Far and Away (a film I have zero nostalgia for) and it blew my socks off. I've never even SEEN The Eiger Sanction and I play it regularly.

I think the last Zimmer score I really got into was Man of Steel. I think things like Interstellar and Dunkirk are amazing on screen but I have no interest in listening to on album.

Of course I'm a themes and tracks guy. If I can't tell what I'm going to listen to by pulling up a certain track then it probably won't hold my attention. This is why The Empire Strikes Back is the ultimate score. wink

Maybe enough people (including directors) repeated the "a good score shouldn't call attention to itself" thing and the composers listened.

 
 Posted:   Jul 14, 2020 - 9:17 PM   
 By:   Advise & Consent   (Member)

Y'all are being way too logical, giving valid reasons and supporting data.

After Horner's first few years--and I really liked (note the tense) those early scores up to maybe 48 Hours, Brainstorm, and Something Wicked I just dropped him, lost all interest, and even developed a negative reaction to the mention of his name. Have not had any use for his music ever since.


That was around the time an article titled "Premature Plaudits" appeared in Soundtrack Magazine? Just about the same here.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2020 - 1:40 AM   
 By:   Mark   (Member)


Jerry Fielding. Wanted to like his scores, liked them on screen, but found it hard to get into them as listening experiences. Hardly listen to him now.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2020 - 5:24 AM   
 By:   Rick15   (Member)

Of course I'm a themes and tracks guy. If I can't tell what I'm going to listen to by pulling up a certain track then it probably won't hold my attention. This is why The Empire Strikes Back is the ultimate score. wink

Amen!


 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2020 - 7:17 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

I thought John Ottman was a "comer" in the 90's and early 2000's, but the last scores of his I own are from the mid-00's (Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang and Superman Returns). I can't think of score he's written since that has grabbed me to the point where I want to own the album.

Astroboy- 2009.

 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2020 - 7:50 AM   
 By:   Nedmerrill   (Member)

Jerry Fielding. Wanted to like his scores, liked them on screen, but found it hard to get into them as listening experiences. Hardly listen to him now.

I personally have never got tired of listening to Jerry Fielding's scores. Imho his scores are exciting and challenging in equal measures and they never get boring or predictable. I listen to his music constantly at home and out and about on mp3. It also doesn't hurt that he scored such great movies as Outlaw Josey Wales and a bunch of Peckinpah stone cold classics.

 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2020 - 10:55 AM   
 By:   Bandolero!   (Member)

I still enjoy all the greats I grew up with (and found later) (Goldsmith, Williams, Bernstein, North Waxman, Newman, Herrmann, Korngold, etc).
In the last 10-15 years, I kind of grew out of Horner and Elfman. Who would have thought that a Horner SPIDER-MAN score would leave me cold? I lost interest in Zimmer in the early 90's. I give him chances, but... nothing.
The newer breed of composers just don't grab my attention like the old guys did. I try their albums, and they're fine, but I don't go back for repeated listens, or new for material.
Like Stravinksy, there's only so much new Herrmann and Goldsmith being released, I can only have so many copies of RITE OF SPRING or RAMBO.
My attention for new (to me) material has gone toward Charlie Parker, John Coltrane, and Thelonious Monk.

 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2020 - 12:23 PM   
 By:   funkymonkeyjavajunky   (Member)

I burnt out on Williams and Zimmer some time ago. I prefer their earlier works. I get the impression that after a composer produces a zillion works, it becomes more difficult to produce something unique/original.

 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2020 - 2:51 PM   
 By:   mgh   (Member)

I still enjoy all the greats I grew up with (and found later) (Goldsmith, Williams, Bernstein, North Waxman, Newman, Herrmann, Korngold, etc).
In the last 10-15 years, I kind of grew out of Horner and Elfman. Who would have thought that a Horner SPIDER-MAN score would leave me cold?
The newer breed of composers just don't grab my attention like the old guys did. I try their albums, and they're fine, but I don't go back for repeated listens, or new for material.
Like Stravinksy, there's only so much new Herrmann and Goldsmith being released, I can only have so many copies of RITE OF SPRING or RAMBO.
My attention for new (to me) material has gone toward Charlie Parker, John Coltrane, and Thelonious Monk.


You might want to put Miles Davis in there. Kind of Blue is one of the great albums of anything anywhere.

 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2020 - 4:01 PM   
 By:   SBD   (Member)

I thought John Ottman was a "comer" in the 90's and early 2000's, but the last scores of his I own are from the mid-00's (Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang and Superman Returns). I can't think of score he's written since that has grabbed me to the point where I want to own the album.

Astroboy- 2009.


Second.

 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2020 - 4:05 PM   
 By:   Jeyl   (Member)

Michael Giacchino
- Give him the keys to Star Trek and he utterly destroys the refit Enterprise with some truly awful mishaps.

 
 Posted:   Jul 16, 2020 - 6:16 AM   
 By:   Bandolero!   (Member)

I was already familiar with Miles Davis. But yeah, certainly a musician to be familiar with wink


I still enjoy all the greats I grew up with (and found later) (Goldsmith, Williams, Bernstein, North Waxman, Newman, Herrmann, Korngold, etc).
In the last 10-15 years, I kind of grew out of Horner and Elfman. Who would have thought that a Horner SPIDER-MAN score would leave me cold?
The newer breed of composers just don't grab my attention like the old guys did. I try their albums, and they're fine, but I don't go back for repeated listens, or new for material.
Like Stravinksy, there's only so much new Herrmann and Goldsmith being released, I can only have so many copies of RITE OF SPRING or RAMBO.
My attention for new (to me) material has gone toward Charlie Parker, John Coltrane, and Thelonious Monk.


You might want to put Miles Davis in there. Kind of Blue is one of the great albums of anything anywhere.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 17, 2020 - 1:37 AM   
 By:   Ag^Janus   (Member)

Hacks, pretty soon after it dawns on me.

 
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