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 Posted:   Oct 20, 2019 - 10:59 AM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

Did Herrmann actually finish composing the score for this film, or was he still writing it at the point where he was fired?

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 20, 2019 - 11:07 AM   
 By:   Bill Cooke   (Member)


He finished composing it and was in the middle of recording it when Hitchcock fired him.

 
 Posted:   Oct 20, 2019 - 2:32 PM   
 By:   'Lenny Bruce' Marshall   (Member)

" Aww, c'mon Hitch. At least let me finish he damn thing"!

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 20, 2019 - 2:37 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

He finished composing it and was in the middle of recording it when Hitchcock fired him.

Thanks!

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 21, 2019 - 6:03 AM   
 By:   John B. Archibald   (Member)

A Hitchcock compilation CD, “Alfred Hitchcock presents... Signatures in Suspense,” with a limited release, had 3 cues from TORN CURTAIN, conducted by Herrmann: “Prelude,” “The Ship, and “The Radiogram,” all listed as “previously unreleased.” The label was Hip.O Records a Universal Music Company. Which makes these seem like Herrmann’s original recordings.

2 “previously unreleased” cues from MARNIE are also included, as well as one from Waxman’s REAR WINDOW.

Fold-out package. Interesting release.

 
 Posted:   Oct 21, 2019 - 7:58 AM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

I think I remember reading he had recorded about twenty-one minutes.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 21, 2019 - 8:18 AM   
 By:   Panavision70   (Member)

The blu-ray, and I assume the DVD, has a supplement with 15 minutes of scenes matched to Herrmann's score. Including the murder scene.

 
 Posted:   Apr 23, 2020 - 12:35 AM   
 By:   Stefan Huber   (Member)

He finished composing it and was in the middle of recording it when Hitchcock fired him.

It seems odd then that both recordings have no music for the final twenty to thirty minutes of the movie. Even if those were intended to be left unscored (except for the ballet source music), there'd still be some music for the end credits?

 
 Posted:   Apr 23, 2020 - 2:21 AM   
 By:   Amer Zahid   (Member)

Battle of the ego's~!

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 23, 2020 - 7:40 AM   
 By:   John B. Archibald   (Member)

I watched a documentary recently on Bernard Herrmann, with an interview with David Raksin. When talking about the Herrmann/Hitchcock breakup, he stated that Hitchcock had made a lot of enemies in Hollywood by his haughty treatment, including the suits at Universal, where TORN CURTAIN was being filmed. Their decision for Hitchcock to have a more “pop” sound for the score may have been an attempt to sabotage him.

As it turned out, John Addison, who’d won an Oscar for his cute score for TOM JONES, ended up writing the replacement score, which I found forgettable. And it wasn’t much as a “pop”- sounding score, either.

What struck me, though, was Raksin’s comment about Hitchcock alienating others in Hollywood. If so, it would go a long way towards explaining why he never got an Oscar for any of his films. Though nominated 5 times for Best Director, he never won, though he was given an Irving Thalberg award in 1968. I always presumed this was due to a generalized attitude that his films were more “entertainments” than more serious art. Reaction to his treating others badly would certainly be a more logical explanation.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 24, 2020 - 2:45 PM   
 By:   roy phillippe   (Member)

I watched a documentary recently on Bernard Herrmann, with an interview with David Raksin. When talking about the Herrmann/Hitchcock breakup, he stated that Hitchcock had made a lot of enemies in Hollywood by his haughty treatment, including the suits at Universal, where TORN CURTAIN was being filmed. Their decision for Hitchcock to have a more “pop” sound for the score may have been an attempt to sabotage him.

As it turned out, John Addison, who’d won an Oscar for his cute score for TOM JONES, ended up writing the replacement score, which I found forgettable. And it wasn’t much as a “pop”- sounding score, either.

What struck me, though, was Raksin’s comment about Hitchcock alienating others in Hollywood. If so, it would go a long way towards explaining why he never got an Oscar for any of his films. Though nominated 5 times for Best Director, he never won, though he was given an Irving Thalberg award in 1968. I always presumed this was due to a generalized attitude that his films were more “entertainments” than more serious art. Reaction to his treating others badly would certainly be a more logical explanation.


Mancini's score to "Frenzy" was tossed also for an equally forgettable score.
I understand they wanted a melodic score akin to "Charade". This was a sore spot for Mancini for years.

 
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