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 Posted:   Oct 10, 2019 - 10:51 AM   
 By:   paulhickling   (Member)

Ok everyone. This is the real debate. Which term describes the same product the best? In the UK we all know crisps are thin crispy slices of potato bagged cold with flavourings. In the US they call 'em potato chips.

For we in the UK chips are of course what the yanks call french fries. Noooooo! Nothing french about 'em!

But this is about what describes them the best. They're crispy, so for me they are CRISPS. The chip debate is null and void because they are clearly sliced. So what gives?

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 10, 2019 - 10:57 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

In most cases, I lean towards the British kinds of everything, but in this particular case, we use 'chips' in Norway too. When we don't use the even more common name 'potetgull' (literally translated as 'potato gold').

The only time we use 'crisps' here is in relation to 'bacon crisps'.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 10, 2019 - 11:05 AM   
 By:   paulhickling   (Member)

In most cases, I lean towards the British kinds of everything, but in this particular case, we use 'chips' in Norway too. When we don't use the even more common name 'potetgull' (literally translated as 'potato gold').

The only time we use 'crisps' here is in relation to 'bacon crisps'.


Intrigued. What does bacon crisps actually mean, and I love the term 'potato gold'. Lovely!

 
 Posted:   Oct 10, 2019 - 11:58 AM   
 By:   Thomas   (Member)

Most of Europe calls them chips as well from my experience. From what I call tell most people in the UK and Ireland refer to them as crisps, though I have come across more people nowadays calling chips fries.

(If any of that makes sense!)

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 10, 2019 - 12:15 PM   
 By:   eriknelson   (Member)

When I'm in the UK, the "chips" I usually get are cut very thick. In the US we often call them "steak fries" or sometimes "home fries." When I'm in France, "frites" are usually much thinner--similar to what we get at fast food joints like McDonald's. Perhaps that's how the term "French fries" originated long ago. Nowadays it seems most Americans just say "fries."

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 10, 2019 - 1:12 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Intrigued. What does bacon crisps actually mean, and I love the term 'potato gold'. Lovely!

These are 'bacon crisps' (although it has other names too, like bacon snacks, baconsvor and what-have-you: https://assets.partyking.org/img/products/1300/baconsnacks-2.jpg. I don't think there's any bacon in them, though, just bacon flavour.

There has actually been a fierce legal battle in Norway regarding the 'potetgull' (potato gold) term. It's being used in colloquial speech by all Norwegians as all kinds of chips/crisps, but it's really the producer Maarud that has the trademark. Other producers have tried to use the name on their own product, but been stopped. Not sure what the outcome eventually was, if there's been an outcome already.

For fries, most Norwegians use the French term 'pommes frites'.

 
 Posted:   Oct 10, 2019 - 1:46 PM   
 By:   dogplant   (Member)

I don't think there's any bacon in them, though...

Having lived with both, I favour 'crisps.' I grew up in U.K. with many strange flavours of crisps, very few of which contained anything resembling what was pictured on the packet, as Thor noted above. Not sure how many of these still exist (see below). It still brings me joy, when buying a round of drinks in a U.K. pub, to grab as many exotic flavours as I can find behind the bar, and then I like to open all the packets and spread them open in the center of the table as a taste adventure for other imbibers. I'm forgetting one particularly exotic flavour – Baked Bean – but that was vile.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 10, 2019 - 1:51 PM   
 By:   KeV McG   (Member)

Those crisps Thor links look similar to what we call Frazzles in the UK.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 10, 2019 - 1:56 PM   
 By:   Xebec   (Member)

Worcester Sauce Seabrooks crisps are ace. I think Seabrooks is just in the north though. They're crinkle cut crisps.

Smith's Bacon Flavoured Fries are the top dog in bacon flavoured crisp-based snackery.

 
 Posted:   Oct 10, 2019 - 2:01 PM   
 By:   Thomas   (Member)

Hedgehog flavour? I hope they share themsmile

Golden Wonder are still readily available. And still the best!

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 10, 2019 - 2:16 PM   
 By:   Xebec   (Member)

Those Hedgehog Flavour crisps weren't that good. I had them once years ago. They were just an odd type of beef flavour. I think people bought them once for the novelty then never again.

 
 Posted:   Oct 10, 2019 - 8:29 PM   
 By:   Advise & Consent   (Member)

In most cases, I lean towards the British kinds of everything, but in this particular case, we use 'chips' in Norway too. When we don't use the even more common name 'potetgull' (literally translated as 'potato gold').

The only time we use 'crisps' here is in relation to 'bacon crisps'.


Potato gold = genius!

 
 Posted:   Oct 10, 2019 - 8:31 PM   
 By:   Advise & Consent   (Member)

The "proper" term in French Canada is croustilles, but we stubbornly insist on calling them chips.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 10, 2019 - 10:14 PM   
 By:   Xebec   (Member)

The "proper" term in French Canada is croustilles, but we stubbornly insist on calling them chips.

The little French i know is from living in Canada and seeing the packaging of crisps and other food items: wavy ondulee! being my favourite.

 
 Posted:   Oct 10, 2019 - 10:18 PM   
 By:   Josh   (Member)

There has actually been a fierce legal battle in Norway regarding the 'potetgull' (potato gold) term. It's being used in colloquial speech by all Norwegians as all kinds of chips/crisps, but it's really the producer Maarud that has the trademark. Other producers have tried to use the name on their own product, but been stopped. Not sure what the outcome eventually was, if there's been an outcome already.

https://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=95637&forumID=7&archive=0

 
 Posted:   Oct 10, 2019 - 10:23 PM   
 By:   Josh   (Member)

The word "crisps" makes me squirm.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 11, 2019 - 7:51 AM   
 By:   paulhickling   (Member)

I don't think there's any bacon in them, though...

Having lived with both, I favour 'crisps.' I grew up in U.K. with many strange flavours of crisps, very few of which contained anything resembling what was pictured on the packet, as Thor noted above. Not sure how many of these still exist (see below). It still brings me joy, when buying a round of drinks in a U.K. pub, to grab as many exotic flavours as I can find behind the bar, and then I like to open all the packets and spread them open in the center of the table as a taste adventure for other imbibers. I'm forgetting one particularly exotic flavour – Baked Bean – but that was vile.



Those pics bring back memories! I also remember buying Chipmunk branded crips at junior school, which included Oxo flavour. Smiths used to have a pickled onion flavour I liked, and Golden Wonder I think once tried sausage and bean. The most bizarre one has to be, and I'm positive I had these... pork scratching flavour. They were delicious but boy oh boy did they repeat on me. I could taste them long after I wanted to.

I'm also old enough to just remember when non-flavoured British crisps had the salt as an optional extra in a little twist of wax paper included. Since they went 'ready salted' Smiths brought the originals back as a nostalgia thing, but the twist was replaced with what looked like a tiny blue tea bag which you tore open.

Among the more local brands I remember are Tudor and XL.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 11, 2019 - 7:53 AM   
 By:   paulhickling   (Member)

The word "crisps" makes me squirm.

Lol. Why? Or is that a silly question......? When the chips are down the word 'crisp' would seem to be more descriptive.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 11, 2019 - 7:58 AM   
 By:   paulhickling   (Member)

Worcester Sauce Seabrooks crisps are ace. I think Seabrooks is just in the north though. They're crinkle cut crisps.

Smith's Bacon Flavoured Fries are the top dog in bacon flavoured crisp-based snackery.


Yeah they would seem to be Thor's bacon crisps. Of course Kev's Frazzles are the same thing. But Frazzles are cheaper and sold more in shops, whereas Bacon fries are sold in pubs, in smaller bags and are more expensive!

 
 Posted:   Oct 11, 2019 - 8:01 AM   
 By:   Josh   (Member)

The word "crisps" makes me squirm.

Lol. Why? Or is that a silly question......? When the chips are down the word 'crisp' would seem to be more descriptive.


Oh, I have no problem with crisp or even crispy, but crisps? Ew. big grin

 
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