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This is a comments thread about Blog Post: Film Score Friday 4/12/19 by Scott Bettencourt
 
 Posted:   Apr 11, 2019 - 9:06 PM   
 By:   Advise & Consent   (Member)

trou du cul or trouduc for short is the expression you are looking for

And to be fair, those kinds can really be found the world over, not just in France.

 
 Posted:   Apr 11, 2019 - 10:17 PM   
 By:   Zoragoth   (Member)

THE LAND THAT TIME FORGOT, starring the immortal Doug McClure, the beauteous Susan Penhaligon, and the versatile Zefferelli favorite John McEnery, and gorgeously scored by Douglas Gamley, subjected to the MST3K treatment - perish the thought!!

On the other hand, given they inflicted same on Maximillian Schell's HAMLET, the Dougster's in good company!!

 
 Posted:   Apr 12, 2019 - 6:42 AM   
 By:   Scott Bettencourt   (Member)

trou du cul or trouduc for short is the expression you are looking for

And to be fair, those kinds can really be found the world over, not just in France.


I know, but they are found with unusual frequency as the protagonists in French cinema. (at least in a certain kind of French cinema -- probably not so much in more mainstream commercial films)

 
 Posted:   Apr 12, 2019 - 8:44 AM   
 By:   CCW1970   (Member)

"It's the kind of film that one is expected to love simply because it's a faux-giallo about a lesbian who makes gay porn, or to hate for those same reasons. "

That's an interesting observation. I feel the same way about some Argento films. They're beautiful to look at, but they just don't hold together if one thinks about them for more than a few minutes.

It's also a problem I have with films that are either "important" or those one is supposed to like because of some artistic or philosophical approach. To me, that's lazy thinking.

I watched Antonioni's L'Avventura a couple of times, and I hated it each time. Yes, I get the supposed irony of the title, and the dual meaning of the word in Italian. It's just a boring fucking movie, about people I just can't get connected to enough to care about. Blow-Up is good. This and the rest of Antonioni's films, meh. Or Catherine Breillat, whose films I find needlessly pessimistic, joyless, and nihilistic.

Some with Fassbinder. If I never see another Fassbinder film, it'll be too soon. At the same time, I love Herzog.

And there a few directors whose work I have love-hate relationships with (Ingmar Bergman, David Lynch, Terrence Malick, Robert Altman).

Interesting how some films and filmmakers spark that reaction.

 
 Posted:   Apr 12, 2019 - 3:00 PM   
 By:   Advise & Consent   (Member)

trou du cul or trouduc for short is the expression you are looking for

And to be fair, those kinds can really be found the world over, not just in France.


I know, but they are found with unusual frequency as the protagonists in French cinema. (at least in a certain kind of French cinema -- probably not so much in more mainstream commercial films)


Didn't spot any luminaries in the list of directors you submitted. Therein lies the problem.

 
 Posted:   Apr 12, 2019 - 3:02 PM   
 By:   Advise & Consent   (Member)

"It's the kind of film that one is expected to love simply because it's a faux-giallo about a lesbian who makes gay porn, or to hate for those same reasons. "

That's an interesting observation. I feel the same way about some Argento films. They're beautiful to look at, but they just don't hold together if one thinks about them for more than a few minutes.

It's also a problem I have with films that are either "important" or those one is supposed to like because of some artistic or philosophical approach. To me, that's lazy thinking.

I watched Antonioni's L'Avventura a couple of times, and I hated it each time. Yes, I get the supposed irony of the title, and the dual meaning of the word in Italian. It's just a boring fucking movie, about people I just can't get connected to enough to care about. Blow-Up is good. This and the rest of Antonioni's films, meh. Or Catherine Breillat, whose films I find needlessly pessimistic, joyless, and nihilistic.

Some with Fassbinder. If I never see another Fassbinder film, it'll be too soon. At the same time, I love Herzog.

And there a few directors whose work I have love-hate relationships with (Ingmar Bergman, David Lynch, Terrence Malick, Robert Altman).

Interesting how some films and filmmakers spark that reaction.


Indeed. Pompous and pretentious. If some of these directors use their work as therapy, one might hope that the end result might at least be entertaining.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 13, 2019 - 10:15 AM   
 By:   ZardozSpeaks   (Member)

I watched Antonioni's L'Avventura a couple of times, and I hated it each time. Yes, I get the supposed irony of the title, and the dual meaning of the word in Italian. It's just a boring fucking movie, about people I just can't get connected to enough to care about. Blow-Up is good. This and the rest of Antonioni's films, meh.

I've seen L'avventura more than twice (and own it on home video) and love it ... enough for L'avventura to reside within my favorite 100 films.
It's certainly not a boring movie according to my perspectives, so one's reception of such depends very much upon one's sensibilities and aesthetics.
One aspect of all art (not only cinema) is to challenge people to accept viewpoints which are different from their own.
If your pre-conceived viewing habits are conditioned towards 'liking' or 'connecting with' protagonists, then challenge yourself to watch characters who are not to your liking and attempt to accept the filmmakers' intentions.

How is one gonna love all the films in The Criterion Collection if one's mindset indicates that films = entertainment which should gratify audiences instead of provoke them. smile

 
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