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 Posted:   Jan 27, 2003 - 8:10 PM   
 By:   DOGBELLE   (Member)

from the house of wax i found on a united artisit lp of movie themes.
a track by mr.morricone called the red tent.
its'a very nice soundin. is there a cd of it???

 
 Posted:   Jan 27, 2003 - 8:16 PM   
 By:   Stephen Woolston   (Member)

from the house of wax i found on a united artisit lp of movie themes.
a track by mr.morricone called the red tent.
its'a very nice soundin. is there a cd of it???


Yes, there is a CD of the score. It's on the LEGEND label, catalogue CD-15

LA TENDA ROSSA (The Red Tent)
1. Love Theme 3:31
2. Do Dreams Go On 2:30
3. Death at the Pole 4:11
4. A love like the Snow 2:12
5. Message from Rome 1:40
6. They're Alive 1:39
7. Farewell 2:51
8. Others who will follow us 22:20

It's a lovely score except for track 8 which is a bit wierd, abstract, and a bit hard to get on with. Lovely themes.

Cheers

 
 Posted:   Jan 27, 2003 - 8:35 PM   
 By:   DOGBELLE   (Member)

thank you

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 27, 2003 - 9:33 PM   
 By:   John B. Archibald   (Member)

One of my few favorite Morricone scores. I don't have many. I actually paid money to see the movie, years ago, at the Warner Theatre in Pittsburgh, now long gone.

Not a good movie, despite its starry cast. But the music was good.

Well worth purchasing.

 
 Posted:   Jan 28, 2003 - 1:49 AM   
 By:   plindboe   (Member)

A great score that one. The first 20 minutes are very melodic and emotional music, and it is pure genius, despite the fact that it only consists of 2 themes. The last 20 minutes is a suite which consists of all dissonant music. I rarely enjoy dissonant music, but this cue can in fact be a great listen when in the right mood. Starts of droning for several minutes and builts up, with occassional morse code sounds, until it evolves into more exciting action music. Composed in 1968, the same year as several other collector favorites, among them; Guns for San Sebastian, Love circle, Once upon a time in the west, The nun from Monza.

Peter wink

 
 Posted:   Jan 28, 2003 - 2:24 AM   
 By:   JJH   (Member)

the last 20 minutes are indeed odd, but after awhile, you start to buy into Morricone's methods, and take it for how it works. It creates a sustained build up. Still, the first 7 tracks are what you want the CD for.


NP -- the new Kilar disc from Marco Polo

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 28, 2003 - 11:19 AM   
 By:   Les Jepson   (Member)

The long track, "Others, Who Will Follow Us", formed side two of the original LP. It is a suite made up of short cues which were used in the film mainly for the various rescue attempts. A similar technique to the way Jerry Goldsmith treated his short cues for THE BOYS FROM BRAZIL commercial release. Morricone's construction is fairly fluid; you wouldn't assume you were hearing a lot of fragments. I remember the massive bass trombone blasts accompanying the Russian icebreakers trying to literally smash their way to the stranded explorers. In short, the music used in this suite was highly effective in the picture.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 29, 2003 - 11:10 AM   
 By:   Les Jepson   (Member)



Yes, there is a CD of the score. It's on the LEGEND label, catalogue CD-15


Beware! LEGEND made two pressings of this CD about a year apart. The first one inherited the distortion evident on the LP; the second one was remastered and has much improved sonics. Both versions have the same catalogue number, but the remastered one clearly says so on the CD booklet front cover.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 29, 2003 - 1:28 PM   
 By:   stalemate12   (Member)

Yes, look for the CD with the yellow triangle at the top. That's the remastered version.

What I can also recommend is the Russian score of the film, which was composed by Aleksandr Zatsepin. Hardly anyone knows about it, but it's almost as good as Ennio's score imo. You'll do extremely well to find it though, as it was only ever released on an extremely rare LP.

Cheers
Tom

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 22, 2009 - 4:26 PM   
 By:   Issac   (Member)

Just got round to listening to the "Love Theme". Typical of Morricone, its emotional, elegant and gorgeous, and I feel great that I was fortunate enough to listen to it smile

 
 Posted:   Jul 22, 2009 - 4:49 PM   
 By:   CH-CD   (Member)

Just got round to listening to the "Love Theme". Typical of Morricone, its emotional, elegant and gorgeous, and I feel great that I was fortunate enough to listen to it smile


It is a beautiful theme
There is a vocal version too, entitled...."In My Thoughts of You".

I have it in my itunes library, but i'm not sure how to post music links on here.
How do I do it .....anyone ??

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 22, 2009 - 4:50 PM   
 By:   MICHAEL HOMA   (Member)

all that issac said.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 22, 2009 - 4:53 PM   
 By:   Issac   (Member)

Just got round to listening to the "Love Theme". Typical of Morricone, its emotional, elegant and gorgeous, and I feel great that I was fortunate enough to listen to it smile
It is a beautiful theme
There is a vocal version too, entitled...."In My Thoughts of You".
I have it in my itunes library, but i'm not sure how to post music links on here.
How do I do it .....anyone ??




Haven't a clue mate, sorry. All I know is that I'm listening to the "Love Theme" yet again, right now big grin

It's just so beautiful.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 22, 2009 - 11:54 PM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

One of my very favourite Morricone scores. The Love Theme is a perfect example of a composer finding a great melody and taking his time with it; a nice slow build up, the soaring voice, the strings kick in, a few wind accents. Before you know it, you're in the midst of a full-blown anthem, three and a half minutes have passed in a flash.

The "Do Dreams Go On" theme is of similar quality, digs into your heart, abruptly interrupted by the exigencies of the film. That covers the first two tracks - the third is also a joy, with a marvellous fugue leading into another statement of the "Dreams" theme, and then a slow down into an icy, pulsating and almost religious passage, followed by the two main themes.

"A Love Like the Snow" has a slightly quicker version of the love theme. "Message From Rome" is a short and gently suspenseful track, introducing the pianistic SOS. Another brief version of the "Dreams" theme is followed by a lingering incarnation in "Farewell" - you can really immerse your self in this one.

"Others, Who Will Follow Us" (English track titles used for clarity, btw) takes up slightly more than half the score, and demands your attention. As stated elsewhere, it's a joining together of many short cues, but in a seamless way. I read once that this huge track is like a cloud, with one part of it developing over here, then another part over there, until the whole thing has changed character without you really being conscious of it. Just before the middle, there's a passage where the SOS distress call is picked up by the orchestra and turned into a sort of "M'aidez Scherzo". The track eventually wanders towards a timeless conclusion.

Yup, I'm quite fond of this score.

 
 Posted:   Jul 23, 2009 - 4:59 AM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)

I, too, love this score and I find I enjoy the long dissonant track very much. After 200+ other scores (perhaps that should 300+) by Maestro Morricone and other European composers (many being Italian) I find I can accept and often like the less tuneful pieces. Though they invariably take some work - it took many listens of Il Gatto A Nove Code before it finally clicked with me and I'm still struggling with Quattro Mosche Di Velluto Grigio amongst others - they can reward greatly.

I had the Love Theme on an old compilation album from the early 70s (OST themes from Paramount Pictures) which was a regular on the turn-table and I did think of buying the film's OST at that time - the long one-track second side put me off! When I started buying CDs on eBay a few years ago this score was one of the first - I paid far too much for the original release and have now bought a new, cheaper, better sounding release (I detest Legend releases!)

I recall reading that the film was a very troubled production. Indeed, the Sean Connery character was an after-thought and his scenes were filmed and inserted later when the original version was thought not to be working.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 24, 2009 - 5:50 AM   
 By:   Les Jepson   (Member)

I recall reading that the film was a very troubled production. Indeed, the Sean Connery character was an after-thought and his scenes were filmed and inserted later when the original version was thought not to be working.

I cannot imagine Roald Amundsen was an afterthought. He was the most famous person associated with the "Italia" disaster. Perhaps Sean Connery was an afterthought in the role, but surely not the role itself.

 
 Posted:   Jul 24, 2009 - 7:20 AM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)

I recall reading that the film was a very troubled production. Indeed, the Sean Connery character was an after-thought and his scenes were filmed and inserted later when the original version was thought not to be working.

I cannot imagine Roald Amundsen was an afterthought. He was the most famous person associated with the "Italia" disaster. Perhaps Sean Connery was an afterthought in the role, but surely not the role itself.


I had a feeling I might get picked-up on this comment and I must admit my thoughts are most vague ... something I read many years ago. I don't know much about the events described in this film and in reading (at least: scanning) a few reviews in IMDb I've gleaned the odd fact or two.

One review from a couple of years ago starts off:

Arctic climes didn't do Sean Connery's initially troubled post-Bond career any favours, although his top billing in The Red Tent is highly misleading, since his supporting role is not much more than a cameo...

And the storyline of the film appears to indicate that it is not a straight-forward "this is what happened drama". Perhaps it had been planned that a lesser-known actor would take the role or perhaps the story had been stuctured to exclude much of the role (which was only a cameo apparently). Further reading of reviews indicates that the role taken by Claudia Cardinale is somewhat superfluous so perhaps my memory has confused the two. If so, my apologies to other readers.

 
 Posted:   Jul 24, 2009 - 7:34 AM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

have about 6 or 7 tracks from this score - and there some are real classic Morricone gems there.

Saw the film some years ago and dont recall much about it except Peter Finch, but its a rare screening on TV, that's for sure.


One review described the film as "...disjointed but fascinating Italian-Russian co-production....memorably scored by Ennio Morricone..."


 
 Posted:   Jul 24, 2009 - 8:02 AM   
 By:   The Cat   (Member)

I have lots of stories about the Red Tent, but can't share them here and now. I just want to add that Sean Connery was a big deal in the whole package. He wasn't an afterthought - he even went to the Soviet Union to shoot his scenes. Bob McCabe biography on the actor has some amusic anecdotes about the Soviet "working method".

 
 Posted:   Jul 24, 2009 - 3:18 PM   
 By:   Last Child   (Member)


What I can also recommend is the Russian score of the film, which was composed by Aleksandr Zatsepin. Hardly anyone knows about it, but it's almost as good as Ennio's score imo.

A combo CD of the Russian score with the Morricone score was released in 2007, though isn't widely distributed. Does anyone know if it's Morricone tracks were lifted from the Legend cd, or from another source? They appear to be abridged:

http://sammel-surium.heim.at/soundtracks/OSTtenda.html

 
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