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 Posted:   May 18, 2015 - 8:41 AM   
 By:   Irv Lipscomb   (Member)

Naxos has released SHAKESPEARE OVERTURES-1 by Castelnuovo-Tedesco. The composer also taught composition at Los Angeles' Music Conservatory, and mentored many Hollywood composers. Included in these were Henry Mancini, Nelson Riddle, Andre Previn, John Williams and Herman Stein. For me, these overtures need a few listens to get really familiar with them, but they are certainly written in a Hollywood film score style. I recommend you get this. 8.572500 There is also a volume two.

 
 Posted:   May 18, 2015 - 11:24 AM   
 By:   Natrebo   (Member)

I've got both Volumes of this and it's good music but I also got the recent CD from the Naxos series of his music that includes his 2 violin Concertos and I really like those two pieces! I was hoping for a CD release of his uncredited Film Score work though when you posted the tread title.

 
 Posted:   May 18, 2015 - 11:53 AM   
 By:   Ray Faiola   (Member)

How about MCT's score to AND THEN THERE WERE NONE?

 
 
 Posted:   May 18, 2015 - 1:27 PM   
 By:   TerraEpon   (Member)

New?

 
 
 Posted:   May 18, 2015 - 1:31 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

I've only ever known him as a mentor/teacher for young students at UCLA who later became famous film composers (as you point out, Irv), but I've never really checked out his own work. I know he has a name in contemporary classical music circles.

 
 Posted:   May 19, 2015 - 7:05 AM   
 By:   the_limited_edition   (Member)

These are relatively new releases of Music by Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco:





The Prophets is one of his most "cinematic" works, and fans of Bloch or Rózsa (or Goldsmith's Masada) should like it.

 
 
 Posted:   May 19, 2015 - 8:54 AM   
 By:   Irv Lipscomb   (Member)

Natebro: You like the Violin Concerto disc more than the overtures discs?

 
 Posted:   May 19, 2015 - 12:57 PM   
 By:   Natrebo   (Member)

Natebro: You like the Violin Concerto disc more than the overtures discs?

Irv,

I have listened to the Violin Concerto disc around 5 times since I got it a few weeks ago, but only remember listening to the Shakespeare Vol. 1 and 2 only twice (if that) before I moved on to other music. I would have to go back and re-listen to those 2 discs but I have to say I was more impressed with the Violin Concerto Disc... it makes me want to delve into his piano concertos because of how he treats the solo instruments in the violin concertos. I'll let you know if anything changes after I have another listen to the Shakespeare collections.

Nat

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 24, 2020 - 9:24 AM   
 By:   eriknelson   (Member)

I recently watched a film entitled EVERYBODY DOES IT (1949). It's a very entertaining satire centered around the opera world. Although Alfred Newman gets the main screen credit, MCT wrote the opera sequences. I did some research concerning MCT. He had a big reputation in Europe until the late 30s. When fascism came to Italy performances of his music were banned. So, like Korngold, Waxman etc. he emigrated to the US and moved to Los Angeles. His entry was sponsored by Jascha Heifetz and Arturo Toscanini, who championed his music. LB Mayer gave him a job at MGM, where he apparently worked on many films. However, as far as I can tell, he rarely received screen credit. Does anyone know why his contributions weren't fully recognized at the time?

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 24, 2020 - 9:28 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

I can't answer you question, Erik, but since this thread was ressurected, I just wanted to mention the Castelnuovo-Tedesco biopic THE MAESTRO which was released in 2018. It's not a good film by any standard, but might be of interest to some.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 24, 2020 - 1:44 PM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

LB Mayer gave him a job at MGM, where he apparently worked on many films. However, as far as I can tell, he rarely received screen credit. Does anyone know why his contributions weren't fully recognized at the time?

Like Eugene Zador, MCT preferred to work in anonymity once he realized that the studios were more interested in productivity than quality. His facility actually allowed him to compose and orchestrate his own work (in ink) -- an exception to the norm that the studio allowed as a money saver. He saved his best ideas for original works. He left M-G-M in 1944, escaping a contract that somehow granted the studio control of even his existing concert music. There were a few film compositions that "came close to pleasing him": And Then There Were None (1945) and The Loves of Carmen (1948). You will find a few pages about him in Dorothy Crawford's A Windfall of Musicians: Hitler's Emigres and Exiles in Southern California.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 24, 2020 - 4:46 PM   
 By:   Alex Klein   (Member)

Miklós Rósza was a big admirer of Castelnuovo, and let us not forget that the italian composer was also Jerry Goldsmith's main composition teacher.

As far as his music goes, Castelnuovo's voice is a cross between french impressionism and italian lyricism. Very adventurous harmonically, and very melodic, whenever he felt like it.

Finally, I believe Castelnuovo's work in Hollywood was quite extensive, but alas he never cared to receive recognition, so a lot of digging must be done to find his contributions for film.

There are many treasures of his to discover, for sure.

Alex

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 24, 2020 - 8:36 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

I think these are all available in better performances than Naxos.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 24, 2020 - 8:53 PM   
 By:   MMM   (Member)

A lot of Mario's music (written for films like RETURN OF THE VAMPIRE, CRIME DOCTOR'S COURAGE, MARK OF THE WHISTLER, NIGHT EDITOR, PRISON SHIP, I LOVE A MYSTERY, TWO-MAN SUBMARINE) became an important part of Columbia's music library, and was reused in pictures like CANNIBAL ATTACK, CAPTIVE GIRL, THE WEREWOLF, MY NAME IS JULIA ROSS, EARTH VS. THE FLYING SAUCERS, TRAPPED BY BOSTON BLACKIE, 20 MILLION MILES TO EARTH, PIRATES OF TRIPOLI, THE MILLERSON CASE, CRY OF THE VAMPIRE, and many more.

 
 Posted:   Oct 25, 2020 - 2:27 AM   
 By:   Yavar Moradi   (Member)

I think these are all available in better performances than Naxos.

I only have the two Naxos volumes but I enjoy them quite a bit. But I’m intrigued: which other performances do you prefer over them, and why?

Yavar

 
 Posted:   Oct 25, 2020 - 5:09 AM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)

I have only the following works by this composer ... and had not known of his involvement in Hollywood/film music:

-Guitar Concerto #1, Op.99 - 1985 - Pepe Romero/Neville Marriner/Academy of St Martin in the Fields
-Shakespeare Songs, Op.24/17#2:Arise! "Sea Murmurs" - 1972 - Jascha Heifetz/Brooks Smith [live concert]
-Shakespeare Songs, Op.24/17#2:Arise! "Sea Murmurs" - 1963 - Erick Fiedman/Brooks Smith

As the guitar concerto dates from 1939 perhaps that pre-dates his cinematic influences; the other piece is earlier (although I don't know when Heifetz transcibed it for violin and piano).

All very nice, even if he is not my go-to composer for guitar works.

Looking at his list of work (Wiki) ... it appears I have a lot to discover!
Mitch

 
 Posted:   Oct 25, 2020 - 8:45 AM   
 By:   Yavar Moradi   (Member)

This disc with Leonard Slatkin conducting his three guitar concertos is pretty excellent:
https://www.discogs.com/Castelnuovo-Tedesco-Kazuhito-Yamashita-Naoko-Yamashita-The-London-Philharmonic-Orchestra-Leonard-Sla/release/7191665

If you want the concert piece that sounds most like film music though (more like a Rozsa biblical epic than anything he wrote for film, honestly...) you have to get his 2nd violin concerto, “The Prophets”. It’s awesome.

Yavar

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 25, 2020 - 10:08 AM   
 By:   eriknelson   (Member)

Thanks everyone for all the information. Tedesco is someone I definitely need to explore!

 
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