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 Posted:   Aug 2, 2020 - 8:09 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

I have to admit I got a bit emotional when they safely splashed down in the gulf. Very relieved it was a successful mission.

 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2020 - 8:58 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Apparently Space X had some party crasher's. They're trying to play it down and promise to do better next time but its pretty inexcusable not to have security for the entire duration of the recovery.


"The SpaceX Crew Dragon Endeavour splashed down off the coast of Pensacola, Florida Sunday (Aug. 2), returning astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley to Earth after their historic Demo-2 test flight. But shortly after that splashdown, private boats swarmed the space capsule, apparently hoping for a closer look.

"That was not what we were anticipating," NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine said in a post-splashdown briefing. "After they landed, the boats just came in. We need to do a better job next time for sure.""

https://www.space.com/boaters-crash-spacex-crew-dragon-splashdown.html

 
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2020 - 12:01 AM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

This must surely be the closesest 'splashdown' to home territory ever? All the home fleet coming out to meet the Endeavour may be reason enough to aim a little further away from the coastline in future? No harm intended. The latitude and longitude figures of the splashdown area was shown on the screen, so all the boatowners with GPS would have known where to head. I haven't yet worked out the coordinates to work out a perpendicular course to the nearest headland. No wonder the information has been kept guarded. I myself, never thought of the possible consequences of landing so close to shore.

Post splashown briefing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qUiwYJ6WSio

Artemis: imagine a day when launching manned spacecraft regularly, with an assortment of misson objective hardware around the Solar System becomes so reliably commonplace and standardised that no Earth citizen could keep track of it all? Jim Bridenstine is right, I think. The pipeline of action needs to be maintained without breakage from now on. Pause, like after Apollo, induces sheer wastage and lost impetus taking decades to wrest back.

Edit: by the way, does anyone hear the John Williams touch in the symphonic music closing out the NASA/SpaceX newscasts?

 
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2020 - 5:48 AM   
 By:   Last Child   (Member)

Proud moment for Mr. Musk. Congratulations on the perfection of a working manned space transportation system.

I wouldn't put my life in the hands of someone who thinks aliens built the pyramids, and taking precautions during an epidemic is an infringement of "personal liberty" (ie his company was shut down).

 
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2020 - 6:26 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

The commercialism aspect is over rated and a fools errand. Modern capitalism bases its foundations on making money at all cost. No matter the cost. Cut backs, layoffs, cutting corners and safety measures. Must make a profit. Launching into space is very hard (and very dangerous.) It should never be considered routine or complacent will set in which will lead to bad things. Frankly I think humanity will tumble and fall before we get much further into space.

 
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2020 - 6:28 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Proud moment for Mr. Musk. Congratulations on the perfection of a working manned space transportation system.

I wouldn't put my life in the hands of someone who thinks aliens built the pyramids, and taking precautions during an epidemic is an infringement of "personal liberty" (ie his company was shut down).


He's just another entitled POS billionaire.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2020 - 7:04 AM   
 By:   chriscoyle   (Member)

A lot of this is true. Musk didn’t invent Tesla he bought it. But would a business have stuck with the space shuttle as a launch vehicle for so long? NASA did even though it cost way more than it was suppose to cost. So far Space X is using tried and true launch systems just upgraded. The major challenge is the Moon base and Mars. That is where it gets dangerous. All astronauts know their lives are on the line maybe they just do think an accident will happen to them. Most accidents are human lapses or errors of judgment.

 
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2020 - 7:23 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

A lot of this is true. Musk didn’t invent Tesla he bought it. But would a business have stuck with the space shuttle as a launch vehicle for so long? NASA did even though it cost way more than it was suppose to cost. So far Space X is using tried and true launch systems just upgraded. The major challenge is the Moon base and Mars. That is where it gets dangerous. All astronauts know their lives are on the line maybe they just do think an accident will happen to them. Most accidents are human lapses or errors of judgment.

The idea was to privatize the LEO business, make it routine and lower costs so NASA could focus on other missions. Going to the Moon and Mars. Send robots to the outer planets and moons. Loft more sophisticated telescopes into space. All good in theory.

But government and the big business sector wants to privatize everything which leads to exploitation of people, land and resources. I'm very concerned about polluting the skies, and other moons and planets. Going into space is very expensive. Where do you get the money? From tax payers anyway. The US tax payer is flipping the bill for Space X.

 
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2020 - 2:26 PM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

With GDP down due to the pandemic, wouldn't there be repercussions for everyone down the line when the kinks start to appear in the chain?

All I know is what I can see, Sol et al. Elon Musk has kick-started the US space business from a becalmed state and admittedly, in tandem with NASA in the hands of Jim Bridenstine, has significantly helped to keep the ball rolling. Now, would the average American feel that given parts of the world that were deep underground in the not too recent past are out of their cave - are they content to sit back and let that part of the country which has always been a world leader in the space business fall back to second or third place under the rumblings of the tax-paying sector?

 
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2020 - 2:47 PM   
 By:   Last Child   (Member)

Proud moment for Mr. Musk. Congratulations on the perfection of a working manned space transportation system.

I wouldn't put my life in the hands of someone who thinks aliens built the pyramids, and taking precautions during an epidemic is an infringement of "personal liberty" (ie his company was shut down).


He's just another entitled POS billionaire.


Another one? Maybe it's a pandemic among the 1%.
Zefram Cochrane had his faults (if you accept his Next Gen profile), but Musk is just a prick. The only thing he had going was a weird name, which you need if you're gonna be a space pioneer.

 
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2020 - 3:34 PM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

NASA is the juggler. The oranges and apples going round are the contractor companies that need to be kept in constant motion and in perfect synch. Whatever you may think or say, that has to be a class act.

 
 Posted:   Aug 4, 2020 - 11:53 AM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken will be talking about their Crew Dragon experience aboard Endeavour in just under a couple of hours, for anyone interested:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R_mO5uu853I

Personally, I'd be interested in what the inertial feelings of going up and coming down were like, especially how crushing 4-5 g feels after having experienced micro gravity/weightlessness.

Another aspect would be the sense of sitting inside the spacecraft using a touch-screen display with very little peripheral vision through the four windows on each side/front of the capsule. I noticed during the flight they chose to have the windows at more or less shoulder height periodically covered, and I have wondered if they did that partially to avoid sideways distraction from having to look directly at the screen when concentrating on handling the ship in real time, because what they were doing so very much resembled outright a game simulation. Like, what is the difference between doing it for real as opposed to doing essentially the same thing on the ground in the sim? The guys spent such an intensive period of mission time focused on the 2D flat panels directly in front of them. This is a significant difference to, say, landing an aircraft with the requirement to see not only the instrument displays, but also the outside world for split second cues.

Edit: Thank you, gentlemen. A most interesting and enlightening talk-through.

 
 Posted:   Aug 4, 2020 - 6:22 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

'It sounds like an animal': NASA astronauts describe the Crew Dragon re-entry experience

The Demo-2 mission went very smoothly, but coming back to Earth is always a bumpy ride.

SpaceX's Crew Dragon spacecraft practically came alive during its dramatic dive through Earth's atmosphere on Sunday (Aug. 2), its NASA crew reported.

NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley said they felt shimmies, tremors and rolls as the capsule, named Endeavour, returned to Earth Sunday to wrap up the nearly picture-perfect Demo-2, SpaceX's first-ever crewed mission.

"The atmosphere makes noise; you can start to hear that rumble outside the vehicle," Behnken said during a news conference today (Aug. 4). "It sounds like an animal, going through the atmosphere, with all the puffs and the atmospheric noise. It continues to gain magnitude as you descend through the atmosphere."

Tempting as it might have been to look out the window as Endeavour neared its splashdown off the coast of Pensacola, Florida, the astronauts elected not to do so. The only available views in the spacecraft are near the astronauts' feet, and the spaceflyers said they felt it was best to monitor their displays rather than crane their heads.

"It didn't seem like the smartest thing to do, as the vehicle was starting maneuvering. At that point, we were trying to make sure we were good and strapped in," Behnken said.

The sounds and sensations were normal, expected and not unfamiliar to Behnken and Hurley. Coming into the two-month-long Demo-2, the duo already had four spaceflights between them, all of which employed NASA's now-retired space shuttle.

SpaceX also gave the astronauts audio recordings and other information about Crew Dragon's first trip to the space station, on the uncrewed Demo-1 mission in 2019, to learn about conditions in the spacecraft, Behnken and Hurley said today.

But Demo-2's return to Earth was still a wild ride. Separation of the crew service "trunk" prior to re-entry felt like being "hit in the back of a chair with a baseball bat, a crack," Behnken said. Parachute deployment produced "a significant jolt," he added, and the crew felt the splash of the ocean before water flowed over the windows.

"You can see from just an overall view of the capsule that re-entry is a pretty demanding environment, with the scorches on the vehicle, and the windows were not spared any of that," Hurley said.

Source:
https://www.space.com/nasa-astronauts-demo-2-crew-dragon-experience.html

 
 Posted:   Aug 4, 2020 - 6:31 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Sounds like a crazy, scary ride with more than a few bumps. These are some brave souls but they were clearly nervous since they elected not to look out the windows. Not that they would get a good view.

Ive been concerned about reverting back to splashdowns. Its gotta be extremely stressful on the back and I wonder about back injuries. This is why I still support a space plane system over this method for reentry. It can be done safely and will lead to less stress on the body and faster recovery of astronauts.

I do have one nitpick with SpaceX calling these men "Space Dads". Can you imagine the uproar if two female astronauts were refereed to as "Space Moms"? Like holy sh*t!

 
 Posted:   Aug 4, 2020 - 6:56 PM   
 By:   Last Child   (Member)

I do have one nitpick with SpaceX calling these men "Space Dads". Can you imagine the uproar if two female astronauts were refereed to as "Space Moms"? Like holy sh*t!

That is nitpicking. They're trying to humanize them, but something like "weekend warriors" doesn't have the right connotation. And while "Dad" and "Mom" are equivalent parental titles, society views "Mom" as a subordinate stereotype. Moms cook and are baby machines, while Dads are gourmet chefs who sire children.

 
 Posted:   Aug 4, 2020 - 7:23 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

I do have one nitpick with SpaceX calling these men "Space Dads". Can you imagine the uproar if two female astronauts were refereed to as "Space Moms"? Like holy sh*t!

That is nitpicking. They're trying to humanize them, but something like "weekend warriors" doesn't have the right connotation. And while "Dad" and "Mom" are equivalent parental titles, society views "Mom" as a subordinate stereotype. Moms cook and are baby machines, while Dads are gourmet chefs who sire children.


Oh, brother! They're not human anyway. NASA is secretly working with an alien reptile race known as SpaceX.

 
 Posted:   Aug 4, 2020 - 7:54 PM   
 By:   Last Child   (Member)

I do have one nitpick with SpaceX calling these men "Space Dads". Can you imagine the uproar if two female astronauts were refereed to as "Space Moms"? Like holy sh*t!

That is nitpicking. They're trying to humanize them, but something like "weekend warriors" doesn't have the right connotation. And while "Dad" and "Mom" are equivalent parental titles, society views "Mom" as a subordinate stereotype. Moms cook and are baby machines, while Dads are gourmet chefs who sire children.


Oh, brother! They're not human anyway. NASA is secretly working with an alien reptile race known as SpaceX.


Wrong. That's just Thetan rumors. NASA is using L. Ron Hubbard's sacred texts describing Xenu's spacecraft technology. What he used to bring his galactic slaves here 75 million years ago so he could destroy them with hydrogen bombs. Don't take my word for it, it's all here:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xenu

 
 Posted:   Aug 5, 2020 - 6:56 AM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

I wonder if they replace those 3 flat touch-screens in-between missions?



 
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