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 Posted:   Apr 24, 2024 - 3:19 PM   
 By:   jenkwombat   (Member)

Executive Decision (1996)
6.5/10

I'd never seen this film before, mostly because I can't stand Steven Seagal. I finally gave it a watch, and it wasn't nearly as bad as I thought it would be, mainly because Seagal's character leaves the film fairly early. smile

An entertaining enough actioner, with another good score by Jerry Goldsmtih. And Kurt Russell is always welcome.

 
 Posted:   Apr 24, 2024 - 3:43 PM   
 By:   Advise & Consent   (Member)

I finally gave it a watch, and it wasn't nearly as bad as I thought it would be, mainly because Seagal's character leaves the film fairly early. smile

If I had a nickel every time someone told me that or a variation thereof. big grin



 
 Posted:   Apr 24, 2024 - 6:28 PM   
 By:   Solium   (Member)

Executive Decision (1996)
6.5/10

I'd never seen this film before, mostly because I can't stand Steven Seagal. I finally gave it a watch, and it wasn't nearly as bad as I thought it would be, mainly because Seagal's character leaves the film fairly early. smile

An entertaining enough actioner, with another good score by Jerry Goldsmtih. And Kurt Russell is always welcome.


It’s a fun popcorn film. Seagals early demise was a surprise back then. That’s how you subvert expectations. Also another actor known for dying in every film he’s in dies as well.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 25, 2024 - 10:42 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

THE MINISTRY OF UNGENTLEMANLY WARFARE (2024) – 8/10

It’s been 35 years since one of Alistair MacLean’s adventure novels has been adapted to the big screen. So, producer Jerry Bruckheimer and director Guy Ritchie have endeavored to fill the gap for that type of film with THE MINISTRY OF UNGENTLEMANLY WARFARE, a film that can slide in right next to WHERE EAGLES DARE and THE GUNS OF NAVARONE when it comes to World War II action tales.

The main thing that the current film is missing is star power. In that department, we must content ourselves with the likes of Henry Cavill, Cary Elwes, and Henry Golding—a far cry from Burton, Eastwood, Peck, and Niven. But it doesn’t much matter that we have no stars, since the film doesn’t spend enough time with them for us to get to know them any more than their brief introductions to us.

The five-man team that takes on the mission of destroying the ship that supplies Hitler’s U-boats is made up of men of varying skills—a demolitions guy (natch), an archer (for taking out those sentries silently), a weapons expert, a navigational genius, etc. They must travel to the West African coast, to the Spanish-controlled island Fernando Po. There, a local club owner (Babs Olusanmokun) and his female confederate (Eiza González) must figure out a way to keep the local German garrison, led by an SS Commander (Til Schweiger), occupied during the raid.

In place of stars, there is plenty of combat action, some good pyrotechnics, and, despite a few hiccups, the sense that the mission comes off just a bit too easily. Perhaps that’s due to a short running time of 2 hours. It’s rare for me to complain that a film is too short, but at times, MINISTRY seems rushed. Interestingly, it is exactly 38 minutes shorter than both WHERE EAGLES DARE and the GUNS OF NAVARONE, both of which seem to have more substance, and suspense, to them. But, we are assured, MINISTRY is based on a true story—one that led a member of the British Naval Intelligence Division that organized the mission, Ian Fleming (played by Freddie Fox), to create the character of James Bond. So there’s that. Still, as these “stiff upper lip” British war films go, this is probably as good as we are going to see these days.

The film has a score with some real themes, and the infectious main title—a guitar and whistling-based theme—would fit right in to any Italian western. The score is by Christopher Benstead, who also does the guitar playing and whistling. So far, I haven’t found any score release, digital or otherwise.

The film came in at a reasonable $60 million (no stars to pay). But unless you are Quentin Tarantino, a World War II-based film is not likely to be big box office, and MINISTRY had an opening week of just $11 million in the U.S. But it hasn’t opened in Britain yet, or elsewhere internationally, so maybe things will pick up. But that title is doing the film no favors.

 
 Posted:   Apr 26, 2024 - 6:11 AM   
 By:   TominAtl   (Member)

THE MINISTRY OF UNGENTLEMANLY WARFARE (2024) – 8/10

It’s been 35 years since one of Alistair MacLean’s adventure novels has been adapted to the big screen. So, producer Jerry Bruckheimer and director Guy Ritchie have endeavored to fill the gap for that type of film with THE MINISTRY OF UNGENTLEMANLY WARFARE, a film that can slide in right next to WHERE EAGLES DARE and THE GUNS OF NAVARONE when it comes to World War II action tales.

The main thing that the current film is missing is star power. In that department, we must content ourselves with the likes of Henry Cavill, Cary Elwes, and Henry Golding—a far cry from Burton, Eastwood, Peck, and Niven. But it doesn’t much matter that we have no stars, since the film doesn’t spend enough time with them for us to get to know them any more than their brief introductions to us.

The five-man team that takes on the mission of destroying the ship that supplies Hitler’s U-boats is made up of men of varying skills—a demolitions guy (natch), an archer (for taking out those sentries silently), a weapons expert, a navigational genius, etc. They must travel to the West African coast, to the Spanish-controlled island Fernando Po. There, a local club owner (Babs Olusanmokun) and his female confederate (Eiza González) must figure out a way to keep the local German garrison, led by an SS Commander (Til Schweiger), occupied during the raid.

In place of stars, there is plenty of combat action, some good pyrotechnics, and, despite a few hiccups, the sense that the mission comes off just a bit too easily. Perhaps that’s due to a short running time of 2 hours. It’s rare for me to complain that a film is too short, but at times, MINISTRY seems rushed. Interestingly, it is exactly 38 minutes shorter than both WHERE EAGLES DARE and the GUNS OF NAVARONE, both of which seem to have more substance, and suspense, to them. But, we are assured, MINISTRY is based on a true story—one that led a member of the British Naval Intelligence Division that organized the mission, Ian Fleming (played by Freddie Fox), to create the character of James Bond. So there’s that. Still, as these “stiff upper lip” British war films go, this is probably as good as we are going to see these days.

The film has a score with some real themes, and the infectious main title—a guitar and whistling-based theme—would fit right in to any Italian western. The score is by Christopher Benstead, who also does the guitar playing and whistling. So far, I haven’t found any score release, digital or otherwise.

The film came in at a reasonable $60 million. But unless you are Quentin Tarantino, a World War II-based film is not likely to be big box office, and MINISTRY had an opening week of just $11 million in the U.S. But it hasn’t opened in Britain yet, or elsewhere internationally, so maybe things will pick up. But that title is doing the film no favors.



Spot on review, totally agree with everything. And I also looked for a score release, which to me is the best I've heard as in film this year. Cool, thematic at times, rhythmic and infectious.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 26, 2024 - 6:51 AM   
 By:   Kentishsax   (Member)

My son the other day wanted to rewatch (for the nth time) Daddy Day Care. It's a really funny, touching and entertaining film. I haven't watched Eddie Murphy-less sequel, Daddy Day Camp but my son tells me it's bad and not in a good way.

 
 Posted:   Apr 26, 2024 - 11:17 PM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)

Murphy's Law (1986) ... 4-/10

I was surprised: I hadn't seen this, despite watching most of Charles Bronson's films (even the dreadful Death Wish X sequels). It isn't very good but provides some entertainment with a story twist (Murphy antagonises a Mafia don when he mistakenly blames him for his present troubles) but this isn't taken very far and merely provides Murphy with a few more villains to kill.

Bronson is watchable and there is decent support from Kathleen Wilhoite though her constant foul-mouthed dialogue becomes tedious ... very quickly.

Story implausibilities (e.g. how does the villain get Arabella from place of capture to place of finale?) mar the film but given this is a Golan - Globus production we can't expect a great script.

Music score is best ignored if possible: Marc Donahue (who provided - with Jerry - pieces for Roy Budd scores frown) is not for me. I do not know the name of his fellow composer, Valentine McCallum.

 
 Posted:   May 1, 2024 - 2:01 AM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)

The Bedford Incident (1965) ... 8/10

A film from my youth ... the ending has stayed with me for 50+ years. A superb performance by lead Richard Widmark as the dedicated but flawed patriotic captain of a modern-day US destroyer makes the film watchable throughout its full running time despite little happening until the tense finale.

Great support from Sidney Poitier, Martin Balsam and Eric Portman and it's amusing to see well-known actors in early roles: Ed (U.F.O.) Bishop, Donald Sutherland and, of course, James (Hawaii Five-O) MacArthur - as the ill-fated Ensign - though I missed spotting Shane Rimmer.

Some of the ship sailing between ice flows scenes looked a little too fake but since this could be a stage production - it's basically a story of a man with too much authority who has lost sight of the responsibilities such authority brings - these location setting scenes are almost superfluous.

A low-key score by Gerard Schurmann does its job but doesn't add much to the viewer's involvement - there appears to be suite from the score available on a GS compilation album.

 
 
 Posted:   May 1, 2024 - 3:12 AM   
 By:   Kentishsax   (Member)

Something Wicked This Way Comes. 10/10.

I don't 'do' horror but the film is more a fantasy on childhood adventure, about growing up in one's hometown (a Bradbury staple) and a son's love for his father and a father for his son. Love winning and good conquering evil. And a great James Horner score (I have the original Intrada CD of it and also the Delerue one but I prefer James' score).

Initially, I only watched it years ago, taped on VHS from a TV broadcast, to hear James' score back in the day and watched it quite a lot but then had a huge gap. I found it on Youtube last year but that better print has gone, now there's a poor quality stretched print. So I decided to buy a copy via Ebay last week and arrived Monday, a region 1 Disney DVD, used but as new. It cost £19.99 (seller in the UK, where I am) but that's better than the Anchor Bay (admittedly the Anchor Bay has the better cover art) prices on the secondary market and the only other edition on Ebay and Amazon is a Spanish one.

I know of the film's troubled production history but I feel it captured the Ray Bradbury emotion and his voice, perfectly, despite the rewrites. It was a great inspiration to get Arthur Hill to do the opening voiceover narration of Bradbury's prose!

 
 
 Posted:   May 1, 2024 - 7:48 AM   
 By:   Hurdy Gurdy   (Member)

I bought the Spanish DVD of SWTWC a while back for around £7.
It has English dialogue and sub-titles, so it's fine in that department.
I did hope to sit down and watch it with the two G-ids, but they got bored after about 15 minutes and asked for the CAPTAIN UNDERPANTS Movie instead. Traaa Laaa Laaaa!!!

 
 
 Posted:   May 1, 2024 - 7:55 AM   
 By:   Kentishsax   (Member)

I bought the Spanish DVD of SWTWC a while back for around £7.
It has English dialogue and sub-titles, so it's fine in that department.
I did hope to sit down and watch it with the two G-ids, but they got bored after about 15 minutes and asked for the CAPTAIN UNDERPANTS Movie instead. Traaa Laaa Laaaa!!!


Captain Underpants is really good!

 
 
 Posted:   May 1, 2024 - 8:13 AM   
 By:   Hurdy Gurdy   (Member)

Yes, it is.
And I have to laugh every time our two boys leap up and do their own versions of I Love Saturday's when that song/bit comes on.

 
 Posted:   May 1, 2024 - 8:48 AM   
 By:   First Breath   (Member)

DEADLY PASSION (1985)

3/10

 
 Posted:   May 1, 2024 - 9:53 AM   
 By:   Solium   (Member)

DEADLY PASSION (1985)

3/10


I'd take a 3 out of 10 80's movie any day over a 3 out of 10 2024 movie.

 
 Posted:   May 1, 2024 - 3:35 PM   
 By:   First Breath   (Member)

That's true...

Jay Ferguson's first film score...

 
 
 Posted:   May 3, 2024 - 2:19 PM   
 By:   Prince Damian   (Member)

Vampire Over London(1952)2/10

With Bela Lugosi, Arthur Lucan, Dora Bryan, Richard Watiss, Lawrence Naismith, Alexander Gauge and Graham Moffatt.

Bela plays the 'vampire' who's kidnapping women to use their blood foe something naughty, not sure what. Through address labels being swapped he comes in contact with mother Riley. Much hilarity (not) and shenanigans ensue.
Billed as a comedy without being really fun. From what I remember I wasn't a fan of Arthur Lucan's mother Riley and after this I'm still not. Two points for a decent cast before they were more well known. I like Bela but he walked through this like an IKEA flat pack. The 'Robbie ' the robot like character stood more chance of a nom.

 
 Posted:   May 3, 2024 - 11:20 PM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)

The Post (2017) ... 5-/10

I enjoyed this drama, mainly due to leads Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks, but can't say I followed the story ... I knew very few of the names of the participants and the script grants the viewer no time to learn who's who and what their roles are. As an example of this: Kay Graham owns/runs the newspaper following the death of her husband but I never got to grips with the importance of her late son-in-law, other than this allowing Meryl Streep to have an emotional scene with her character's daughter.

The opening war scenes were completely out-of-place: we didn't know in those scenes who Daniel Ellsberg/Matthew Rhys was and it felt as if there had been heavy cutting. At the finale, there are heart-searching discussions as to whether publication should go ahead given the risk of legal action and yet those legal ramifications are given scant screen time ... perhaps more pruning? Similarly the threat to the newspaper re: its public-listing is completely ignored: it's unlikely the Supreme Court decision was announced over night so did the banks underwriting the issue hold firm or walk away?

John Williams' score is very low key for most of the film with only the emotional family scenes towards the end and the newspaper print run action theme being stand-outs.

I doubt I'd bother to watch it again.

 
 Posted:   May 6, 2024 - 1:30 AM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)

Enemy of the State (1998) ... 5/10

Re-visit a pop-corn action thriller which provides lots of fun, some great dialogue, engaging performances from all the cast ... but is mindless and almost instantly forgettable. Also, the middle section where Robert/Will Smith is chased through the hotel and then down the driveway tunnel is boring and far too much.

The score by Harry Gregson-Williams and Trevor Rabin leaves no impression ... I can't recall any of it.

 
 
 Posted:   May 6, 2024 - 2:11 AM   
 By:   Rameau   (Member)

Vampire Over London(1952)2/10

With Bela Lugosi, Arthur Lucan, Dora Bryan, Richard Watiss, Lawrence Naismith, Alexander Gauge and Graham Moffatt.

Bela plays the 'vampire' who's kidnapping women to use their blood foe something naughty, not sure what. Through address labels being swapped he comes in contact with mother Riley. Much hilarity (not) and shenanigans ensue.
Billed as a comedy without being really fun. From what I remember I wasn't a fan of Arthur Lucan's mother Riley and after this I'm still not. Two points for a decent cast before they were more well known. I like Bela but he walked through this like an IKEA flat pack. The 'Robbie ' the robot like character stood more chance of a nom.


That's, Mother Riley Meets The Vampire, the last time I saw that was on TV in the fifties. I think the reason I remember it is that it has a vampire & robot (I was mad on all the stuff then...& still am) Bela Lugosi must have been on skid row by then. There was lots of Old Mother Riley comedy films, going back to the thirties, & showing up on TV back in the fifties. Mother Riley; soon to be totally forgotten. The director John Gilling went on to do some good films, quite a few for Hammer (& seven Department S episodes). I'll look out for Vampire Over London (probably on Talking Pictures*) & watch it for old times sake.

* Ah, I see it's on this Thursday smile - & the film on after it looks like it's worth a watch; Midnight At Madame Tussaud's (1936).

 
 
 Posted:   May 6, 2024 - 3:22 AM   
 By:   Prince Damian   (Member)

It had a few titles I think.

 
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