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 Posted:   Jun 24, 2019 - 8:22 AM   
 By:   Nightingale   (Member)

One episode I always had a soft spot for was Dragon's Domain. As a kid (around 14 on first broadcast) that would be because it had a rare (for season 1) monster. On subsequent viewings it was the storytelling style of the episode with Barbara Bain's narration and the use of Adagio in G minor that helped sell the piece, the latter of course a most obvious example of those 2001 influences with a semi-classical piece on the soundtrack. Anyway it was nicely put together.

I have to laugh at old Barbara though. She had the most ice cold sounding voice, and when she's introduced in the opening titles of each episode, instead of just looking serious like her husband, she's spun around like she's on a turntable! Always looked comical to me especially suspecting SHE probably thought it made her look cool (maybe to go with that cold voice).


Barbara Bain's voice always sounds like a forced whisper.

 
 Posted:   Jun 24, 2019 - 11:34 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

I'm awarding this " The Nerdiest Thread of the Decade" Award.

Not even close!

 
 Posted:   Jun 24, 2019 - 11:35 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

One episode I always had a soft spot for was Dragon's Domain. As a kid (around 14 on first broadcast) that would be because it had a rare (for season 1) monster. On subsequent viewings it was the storytelling style of the episode with Barbara Bain's narration and the use of Adagio in G minor that helped sell the piece, the latter of course a most obvious example of those 2001 influences with a semi-classical piece on the soundtrack. Anyway it was nicely put together.

I have to laugh at old Barbara though. She had the most ice cold sounding voice, and when she's introduced in the opening titles of each episode, instead of just looking serious like her husband, she's spun around like she's on a turntable! Always looked comical to me especially suspecting SHE probably thought it made her look cool (maybe to go with that cold voice).


Barbara Bain's voice always sounds like a forced whisper.


Yeah, that opening meant to look dramatic is really very silly looking today. But it was cool at the time.

 
 Posted:   Jun 24, 2019 - 1:34 PM   
 By:   Spinmeister   (Member)

that opening meant to look dramatic is really very silly looking today. But it was cool at the time.

Why silly? Those hero poses are part and parcel of the whole theatrical presentation. It was cool back then and it's still cool today.

Show me an opening title sequence from the past 10 years that comes close to selling an action-adventure program with such unapologetic bravado (as if that were a bad thing).

This fear of going BIG explains all the visually dour, musically banal openers HBO and those who imitate it invariably fall back upon.

 
 Posted:   Jun 24, 2019 - 1:40 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

that opening meant to look dramatic is really very silly looking today. But it was cool at the time.

Why silly? Those hero poses are part and parcel of the whole theatrical presentation. It was cool back then and it's still cool today.

Show me an opening title sequence from the past 10 years that comes close to selling an action-adventure program with such unapologetic bravado (as if that were a bad thing).

This fear of going BIG explains all the visually dour, musically banal openers HBO and those who imitate it invariably fall back upon.


Next you're going to tell me bell bottoms and afros aren't silly. wink

 
 Posted:   Jun 24, 2019 - 2:03 PM   
 By:   Scott McOldsmith   (Member)

Well, Afros are case by case, but the bell bottoms are a little wonky. I agree, though, the opening title sequences are still pretty great for this fan.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 24, 2019 - 3:37 PM   
 By:   Nightingale   (Member)

Well, Afros are case by case, but the bell bottoms are a little wonky. I agree, though, the opening title sequences are still pretty great for this fan.

Yes, the opening sequence was a real adrenaline booster as a kid craving sci-fi adventure. Very exciting. The rest of Barry Gray's music was a tad too down beat I thought (his music for Space:1999 I mean).

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 25, 2019 - 9:09 PM   
 By:   Paul MacLean   (Member)

Next you're going to tell me bell bottoms and afros aren't silly. wink

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 25, 2019 - 9:10 PM   
 By:   Paul MacLean   (Member)

Double Post.

 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2019 - 8:12 AM   
 By:   Scott McOldsmith   (Member)

Well, Afros are case by case, but the bell bottoms are a little wonky. I agree, though, the opening title sequences are still pretty great for this fan.

Yes, the opening sequence was a real adrenaline booster as a kid craving sci-fi adventure. Very exciting. The rest of Barry Gray's music was a tad too down beat I thought (his music for Space:1999 I mean).


I think his music works like Gangbusters married to the episodes, but on album it's a little less entertaining. Derek Wadsworth, though, works extremely well for me on album but is far and away very over the top in some episodes.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2019 - 8:24 AM   
 By:   paulhickling   (Member)

Just to clarify.. The only bit I find silly in that title sequence is the 'Barbara Bain on a turntable' moment. It looks like someone (possibly her given the Landaus reputation from what the late, great, Sylvia Anderson says) thought it was a good idea, and it just looks like there must be a guy out of shot turning her around. Slightly bizarre. Hubby Martin looks fine in his shot.

From the drum roll to Gray's final flourish the sequence is a typically exciting Gerry Anderson title sequence, along with Stingray, Thunderbirds and UFO where action is king! Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons went for spooky instead, but still another great sequence. I love the true Anderson era output, which for me is from Supercar to Space 1999 Season 1.

I'm quite a fan of Gray's music. An Anderson series without it is like a Hitchcock without Herrmann (despite other great Hitch composers) or a Sergio Leone without Morricone. It's just not quite the same.

 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2019 - 9:21 AM   
 By:   Scott McOldsmith   (Member)

As much as I do enjoy the work of the other composers, shows like The Protectors, Space Precinct and 1999 Year 2 feel less like Anderson productions mainly because of style and the music. I agree, Barry Gray was as much a part of the success of Anderson's fomula's as Derek Meddings and Nick Allder.

 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2019 - 9:46 AM   
 By:   Spinmeister   (Member)

Bain's lazy Susan into the camera doesn't come out of nowhere. It's in direct response to Landau's head swivel. It's all about building momentum to a visual and audio crescendo.

Imagine the sequence instead with a static forward shot of Landau, then a static forward shot of Bain, and then the static title card with the music being the only element leading the call to action and adventure.

It would be dull as can be.

 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2019 - 10:04 AM   
 By:   Scott McOldsmith   (Member)

Yeah, Landau looks from slightly off screen to Bain. She looks from him out toward us. The difference is, he moves his head while she swivels her body.

 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2019 - 10:42 AM   
 By:   'Lenny Bruce' Marshall   (Member)

" Fascinating"
- M. Spock

 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2019 - 10:43 AM   
 By:   Spinmeister   (Member)

But it's the unabashed theatricality of their introductions in tandem with the unabashed theatricality of Grey's music which makes it memorable.

So, OK, take two: instead of swivelling toward the audience, Bain mirrors Landau and simply turns her head toward him.

What pops into your skull?

Me? The Brady Bunch.



To add … Bain's star turn pales in flamboyance compared to the aerial zoom and whip-around Jack Lord executes in Hawaii Five-O:



But it's memorable and viewers still love it. And props to Morton Stevens, of course.

 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2019 - 11:15 AM   
 By:   Scott McOldsmith   (Member)

Also connected: Derek Wadsworth apparently was asked to create a theme with the same sort of drive as Hawaii Five-O. And he did it while the music said "Spaaaaace nineteen ninety-NINE!"

 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2019 - 1:41 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

The Brady Bunch was a comedy and the opening was appropriately cute. There's really no comparison with the 1999 opening. H5O like 1999 were cool openings in their days but some techniques don't age well over time. From a nostalgia stand point its still cool. And gawd don't almost every film today basically mimic all the wild editing techniques from H5O nowadays? The sped up motion, slow downs, pauses, fast zoom ins and zoom outs. It was cool for an opening to a show but entire films are edited that way nowadays. Its nauseating.

 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2019 - 2:02 PM   
 By:   'Lenny Bruce' Marshall   (Member)

I never want to see the word "swivel" again!

Lol.

 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2019 - 2:04 PM   
 By:   Scott McOldsmith   (Member)

The Brady Bunch was a comedy and the opening was appropriately cute. There's really no comparison with the 1999 opening. H5O like 1999 were cool openings in their days but some techniques don't age well over time. From a nostalgia stand point its still cool. And gawd don't almost every film today basically mimic all the wild editing techniques from H5O nowadays? The sped up motion, slow downs, pauses, fast zoom ins and zoom outs. It was cool for an opening to a show but entire films are edited that way nowadays. Its nauseating.

We're lucky to get opening titles at all now. Composers don't have that chance to shine, at least not on Network TV.

Streaming services still have them, at least. And whatever premium cable shows I've seen.

 
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