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 Posted:   Jan 25, 2020 - 3:47 AM   
 By:   Damian   (Member)

BBC reporter Nicola Ford could use a plate of pie and mash, the poor scrawny thing.

So pie and mash is just a London thing? Small country, vast differences, it would seem.


Sausage , mash and onion gravey.With some left over to dip a butty in.

 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2020 - 3:58 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Sausage , mash and onion gravey.With some left over to dip a butty in.

I've been significantly cutting down on my beef and pork consumption these days, but that sure sounds good! Is that the variation in your part of the UK? I wonder how many variations on pie and mash there are.

 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2020 - 6:38 AM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

Most pie n mash places in london and essex offer parsley "liquor" OR gravy, whichever you prefer.

 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2020 - 6:46 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Most pie n mash places in london and essex offer parsley "liquor" OR gravy, whichever you prefer.

Thanks for the tip, Bill. I'll have to try the liquor because I may never pass that way again...you have my permission to scurry like a rat prior to my arrival in November.

 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2020 - 6:50 AM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

I may be away. But if i did london, it wouldve been a possibility! Unfortunately i dont do london anymore. Its a shithole. Sodom n gomorrah. Id only venture in with 50 ex icf hoolis as security. Lol. smile

 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2020 - 6:56 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Hopefully the museums (V&A, Tate, etc.) will still be there when I arrive...or at least not a "no go" zone.

...and of course the pie, the mash, and the sausage roll. wink

I think I've gained weight just by reading this thread!

 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2020 - 6:58 AM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

Wait to see how this coronavirus pans out first. Might not be any travel by November!!

 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2020 - 7:04 AM   
 By:   Damian   (Member)

Sausage , mash and onion gravey.With some left over to dip a butty in.

I've been significantly cutting down on my beef and pork consumption these days, but that sure sounds good! Is that the variation in your part of the UK? I wonder how many variations on pie and mash there are.


It's a variation in our house,at least.Sometimes dipping the butty is better than the meal itself.
And to be a bit more exotic put some turmeric or Cajun spice in the mash.

 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2020 - 7:08 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

It's a variation in our house,at least.Sometimes dipping the butty is better than the meal itself.
And to be a bit more exotic put some turmeric or Cajun spice in the mash.


I watched some London guide video and the gravy on the pie looked delicious. The liquor, not so much, but it is unique, so it must be tried.

Don't get me started on spicy food--I absolutely love it! I've long wanted to start a spicy food-hot sauce thread.

Tonight is Chicken Vindaloo night.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2020 - 7:37 AM   
 By:   paulhickling   (Member)

Yes I too would try liquor on my pie and mash if I was somewhere where it was served traditionally. It seems an odd thing to have with pie and mashed potatoes, because I was brought up with parsley sauce as something to put on steamed or baked cod fish and served with new potatoes and garden peas. But I'm happy to try the delicacy of our cockney cousins.

And I'm fairly certain, Jim, that pie and mash as a dish is a London classic not so common anywhere else. Here in the north, we tend to have pie and peas, mushy of course, with mint sauce and usually a bit of gravy. Essential as part of the bonfire night celebrations on November 5th. Fish and chips is pretty much a national UK, as opposed to merely English, dish, though mushy peas was I think a northern thing for the most part at least to start with. Another essential in northern chippies. They were the ONLY accompaniment up to the 1960s when a chip shop could serve no more variety than fish, chips, fishcakes and mushy peas to make a living. Curry sauce appeared eventually as well as all manner of things.

Didn't even have parsley sauce with fish cakes, something else I came to later in life so it too seemed odd. They have breadcrumbs on so to me they need to be crispy and served with chips, and either garden or mushy peas. Of course salt and vinegar are a must as with fish and chips, and perhaps a little ketchup. When I was a kid ketchup went on a lot of things. But I didn't stop there. Lots of sauces were tried. Often if we ran out of vinegar at home I'd put any vinegar based sauce on my chips including brown sauce (eg. HP), Branston Pickle and even mango chutney!

 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2020 - 7:41 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

The half-baked reason I wondered aloud if Brits dislike mustard (to say nothing of their "established" hatred of garlic), is because so many not-so-fancy restaurants have red and brown sauce on every table, but never to my knowldge, mustard. I remember an episode of STILL GAME--yes, a hard-hitting reality program--in which Victor and Jack buy bulk mustard for their food-cart scheme. Winaton asks why they have mustard, and Victor replies "hot dogs." This, along with the red and brown sauce setup, made naive me think that you Brits dislike mustard.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2020 - 7:51 AM   
 By:   paulhickling   (Member)

Oh Jim. There is no such thing as an England without mustard.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colman%27s

https://www.colmans.co.uk/products/mustards.html

The above product is in fact English mustard and is very hot indeed. NOT intended especially for hot dogs. They tend to be served with the weak American mustard along with ketchup, which I like. But Coleman's is the thing for a ham sandwich. But only a smattering unless you want to make your eyes water! A very traditional English favourite.

So get rid of those thoughts of a no-mustard UK!

 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2020 - 7:56 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Then why isn't mustard included with the red and brown sauces on restaurant tables? Huh? Huh?

Funny how "Yellow mustard" is derided for how mild it is yet red sauce and brown sauce don't suffer that same discrimination. Our wonderful, classic yellow mustard is but one of a limitless number of mustards available here. I adore a spicy mustard spiked with horseradish or any other hot-inclined seasoning. The Brits are known for their love of curry, so at least spicy food isn't treated like some homely mustard relative. wink

 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2020 - 8:09 AM   
 By:   Damian   (Member)

It's a variation in our house,at least.Sometimes dipping the butty is better than the meal itself.
And to be a bit more exotic put some turmeric or Cajun spice in the mash.


I watched some London guide video and the gravy on the pie looked delicious. The liquor, not so much, but it is unique, so it must be tried.

Don't get me started on spicy food--I absolutely love it! I've long wanted to start a spicy food-hot sauce thread.

Tonight is Chicken Vindaloo night.


Turmeric makes.your mash look a lovely yellow,rather than same ol' white and it's cheaper than saffron

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2020 - 8:58 AM   
 By:   Xebec   (Member)

The half-baked reason I wondered aloud if Brits dislike mustard (to say nothing of their "established" hatred of garlic), is because so many not-so-fancy restaurants have red and brown sauce on every table, but never to my knowldge, mustard. I remember an episode of STILL GAME--yes, a hard-hitting reality program--in which Victor and Jack buy bulk mustard for their food-cart scheme. Winaton asks why they have mustard, and Victor replies "hot dogs." This, along with the red and brown sauce setup, made naive me think that you Brits dislike mustard.

"Established hatred of garlic"? Are you mad, man?

Hot English mustard has fairly limited applications, i suppose. So it's not essential to greasy spoons and other non-posh places. You have to have it with roast beef, and ham and cheese sandwiches, black pudding. I mix it into beans with some vinegar, too.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2020 - 9:11 AM   
 By:   KeV McG   (Member)

I Hate Mustard. Always Have. Always Will.
Just like Mayonnaise and Salad Cream. Destroys everything it comes into contact with.
But...
Garlic...Yum! (especially on bread) wink

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2020 - 9:20 AM   
 By:   Xebec   (Member)

I Hate Mustard. Always Have. Always Will.
Just like Mayonnaise and Salad Cream. Destroys everything it comes into contact with.


Just like Liverpool.

 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2020 - 10:28 AM   
 By:   Damian   (Member)

Apparently,when I was a baby, I used to like mustard on my dummy.Hate it now,wonder why!

 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2020 - 11:20 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Pork Pies look like SPAM inside a pies crust.

 
 Posted:   Jan 26, 2020 - 6:19 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I do love me a puff pastry atop a creamy chicken-and-mushroom pot pie this time of year.

Was craving one and ate one in August in Florida one year; I wouldn't recommend doing that unless one likes dining while sitting in one's sweat.

 
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