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 Posted:   Sep 24, 2018 - 6:12 PM   
 By:   The Wanderer   (Member)

John Workman lettering is immense. I'm just reading Arthur Suydam's Cholly and Flytrap and it really suits that. His work suited a lot of styles too. I lived his lettering in Gotham By Gaslight. It's an art in itself is lettering.

 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2018 - 8:15 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Yeah, buying that one! I love Back Issue. TwoMorrows produces loads of fantastic content if you love the Silver and Bronze Ages.

I've purchased the full-color PDFs of BACK ISSUE...back issues...when the print versions were all b&w. I believe the more recent issues are in all color. I also recommend their Batman in the Bronze Age, Batman sidekicks, and Superman in the Bronze Age issues. I'd like to get the Superman 40th anniversary issue in its print form.

Fun! I was just this past weekend enjoying the new issue of TwoMorrow's latest rag, Retro Fan. I only buy once in a while, but this one is a must get. It took me months to go see the movie (I think it was Spring Break 1979) because Superman?! Boy was I surprised when it turned out I loved it, bought up all the publications at the time, still have 'em....

You're quite a bit older than I am, Sean, but your college era Supes enthusiasm is commendable. wink

I was 8 in 1979, and while Batman was always my favorite, I was also a big Superman fan. I recently found some old snapshots of me wearing my "Ben Cooper" brand Superman Halloween costume--it had short sleeves, for cryin' out loud. I also had the Topps trading cards as well as the Mego action figure that were made years before the film's release. I never did own the Williams score LP.

Superman dominated pop culture in 1979 in a way he hasn't since. It was a fun time to be a kid.

 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2018 - 2:42 PM   
 By:   Sean Nethery   (Member)

Hey, Jim, I'm only 9 years older dude - that's not quite a bit any more! wink Funny how that range, which was a lot at our respective ages in 1979, seems pretty trivial now.

That was my senior year in high school, and I had started buying comics more seriously in the past year - but almost exclusively Marvel (especially X-Men, the Avengers, Iron Man, Machine Man, Captain Marvel and the Hulk color magazine). DC just seemed corny and old-hat, but the movie sure didn't. I remember buying a couple of then-current Superman comics and they still seemed disappointingly old-fashioned compared to Marvel, and to the movie.

Yet here I am decades later enjoying the Justice League/Justice Society crossovers, and the 70's All-Star Justice Society revamp. So maybe I was just too young to appreciate DC then. smile

 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2018 - 2:53 PM   
 By:   drop_forge   (Member)

John Workman lettering is immense. I'm just reading Arthur Suydam's Cholly and Flytrap and it really suits that. His work suited a lot of styles too. I lived his lettering in Gotham By Gaslight. It's an art in itself is lettering.

I LOVE the saga of Cholly & Flytrap. I love just about everything Art Suydam's done. He's right there with Wrightson and Corben as being somebody whose work is very unique and not easily emulated, but he doesn't draw the same accolades.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2018 - 3:41 PM   
 By:   The Wanderer   (Member)

John Workman lettering is immense. I'm just reading Arthur Suydam's Cholly and Flytrap and it really suits that. His work suited a lot of styles too. I lived his lettering in Gotham By Gaslight. It's an art in itself is lettering.

I LOVE the saga of Cholly & Flytrap. I love just about everything Art Suydam's done. He's right there with Wrightson and Corben as being somebody whose work is very unique and not easily emulated, but he doesn't draw the same accolades.


I like the craziness of it. The writing and the art has a very loose feel. Some really nice line work. Lots of interesting visuals. I'd remembered reading it in about '90 or so and recently found a collection and bought it.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2018 - 3:44 PM   
 By:   The Wanderer   (Member)

Also reading some Joe Kubert Tarzan. His figure work is stunning. He's just a great artist in general. I always lived his Sgt Rock stuff. The stories are a bit mad but each panel is just tremendous and keeps the story flowing. Wish I knew how he did it.

 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2018 - 6:47 PM   
 By:   drop_forge   (Member)

Joe's exactly the kind of artist whose work I prefer to look at. He's not afraid of lines. He's not afraid of texture. He never worried about keeping it so clean as to expect the colorist to "finish" the art for him. The colors complemented his linework, and that was that. The real beauty lay in what came form his pen or brush.

 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2018 - 5:10 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

John Byrne was asked the following the on his message board:

"I would therefore really like to hear your opinion on what you consider to be the best work of these other great artists (in no particular order)":

For Joe Kubert, Byrne wrote:

"Every line he ever drew."

http://www.byrnerobotics.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=52493&PN=1&totPosts=9

For me, Jim "Everyman" Phelps, I love Kubert's Sgt. Rock work, and have for nearly 40 years. When I was nine, I remember my then-horror at seeing how Kubert rendered the cover of Batman #327 when I first saw it on one of those "Hey Kids! Comics!" spinner racks at a local 7-11 store. I had been anxiously awaiting that issue, as it was the second of a Len Wein two-part story. Later the nxt year, when I first found Kubert's Sgt. Rock stuff, I immediately recalled that memorable Batman cover.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2018 - 6:46 AM   
 By:   The Wanderer   (Member)

I was always miffed if a comic had a Kubert cover but not his stuff inside! What a swizz!

Oh phelps that unknown soldier page that's in your link is just fantastic.

 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2018 - 7:58 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I'm pretty sure Kubert always inked his own work.

One of the posters on that Byrne thread said that it took him a long time until he appreciated Kubert. That's a sentiment I think a lot of comic fans had because Kubert was known primarily for his war comics, not super heroes. As a kid, I read DC's "Battle Books" in great abundance. Among the comic aficionados I knew in childhood, no one read war comics and none of them ever even mentioned Joe Kubert. My best friend and I were in awe of the great man's work.

Kubert's Hawkman is magnificent, too.

 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2018 - 8:17 AM   
 By:   Michael Scorefan   (Member)

Joe Kubert is definitely a master. His two sons, Adam and Andy are both excellent artists as well. Hawkman is the first character I immediately think of when I hear Joe Kubert.

Admittedly, I haven't read any of his war comics. Aside from Marvel's G.I. Joe, war comics just didn't appeal to me. I should check out some of his work just to appreciate his art if nothing else.

 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2018 - 8:17 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Hey, Jim, I'm only 9 years older dude - that's not quite a bit any more! wink Funny how that range, which was a lot at our respective ages in 1979, seems pretty trivial now.

That's because life has wizened us both. Meaning me. wink

That was my senior year in high school, and I had started buying comics more seriously in the past year - but almost exclusively Marvel (especially X-Men, the Avengers, Iron Man, Machine Man, Captain Marvel and the Hulk color magazine). DC just seemed corny and old-hat, but the movie sure didn't. I remember buying a couple of then-current Superman comics and they still seemed disappointingly old-fashioned compared to Marvel, and to the movie.

Of course, being 9 at the time, I found DC's old fashioned approach to be what appealed to me. They had Superman AND Batman, the two greatest super-heroes of all time in my view. I adored DC's house ads, which worked like a charm in getting me to look for those books. I also loved the Daily Planet page, "Ask the Answer Man!" column, and of course Hembeck's comic strip.

Sure, I liked Spidey and the Hulk, but I remember being turned off by Marvel's "in-your-face" house ads. Howard the Duck, Stan "Bounty Towel" Lee plugging Pizzazz, and that cheeky X-Men ad by Dave Cockrum in which Iceman looks like a snowman. Marvel tried too hard to be cool, though I didn't see at that way at the time, it just rubbed me the wrong way. I was a weird kid.

Yet here I am decades later enjoying the Justice League/Justice Society crossovers, and the 70's All-Star Justice Society revamp. So maybe I was just too young to appreciate DC then. smile

Great stuff! Also check out the All-Star Squadron, written by Roy Thomas.

 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2018 - 9:29 AM   
 By:   Sean Nethery   (Member)

Yep, no argument about Supes and Bats being the greatest heroes - and when I was 9 they were my faves as well (Neal Adams' Man Bat scared the hell out of me - I can't believe I randomly got his first appearance back when I only got a few comics a year as a little kid).

And yep, I've got Roy Thomas' All-Star Squadron phone book, though kind of prefer his Marvel's 70's Invaders foray. See, I always gotta drag it back to Marvel.

 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2018 - 10:36 AM   
 By:   drop_forge   (Member)

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2018 - 11:00 AM   
 By:   The Wanderer   (Member)

Fantastic. He never lost his ability!

 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2018 - 2:17 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Fantastic. He never lost his ability!

Kubert had a tremendous work ethic. Spending time at his eponymous art school and staying active "in the biz."

 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2018 - 5:13 PM   
 By:   drop_forge   (Member)

Norm Breyfogle just died. He was 58. RIP.

 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2018 - 5:25 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Norm Breyfogle just died. He was 58. RIP.

Given his recent health issues, I can't say I'm surprised, but still...

https://comicbook.com/dc/2018/09/26/norm-breyfogle-batman-artist-died/

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2018 - 6:18 PM   
 By:   The Wanderer   (Member)

Jesus, I'm gutted. He was great. I was worried after he had the stroke, which I'm sure was a major contributing cause. He was just very talented and his work was a great influence on me when I was a kid. Thanks for the memories, Norm.

 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2018 - 11:50 PM   
 By:   Michael Scorefan   (Member)

Rest in Peace. Breyfogle is one of my favorite Batman artists, and was easily my favorite artist who was pencilling Batman while I was collecting the title.



Perhaps my favorite work of his was for Batman: Holy Terror, which was a great Elseworlds book.

 
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