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 Posted:   Apr 3, 2024 - 1:31 PM   
 By:   henry   (Member)

There’s more to a film than the way it looks, TSFS is full of heart and passion.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 3, 2024 - 3:33 PM   
 By:   henry   (Member)

On a side note, does anyone remember the set of TSFS drinking glasses from Taco Bell in 1984? I used to have the entire set of, I think, four but have lost them over the years.

 
 Posted:   Apr 3, 2024 - 7:38 PM   
 By:   Octoberman   (Member)

There’s more to a film than the way it looks...


I couldn't agree more.
Besides, there is nothing wrong with the FX in TSFS that wasn't also wrong with the FX of every other sci-fi film from that era.
I will take old-fashioned mattes and model work over excessive CG wankery any day.
And if that's just me, I'm fine with it. big grin

 
 Posted:   Apr 4, 2024 - 1:44 AM   
 By:   Solium   (Member)

On a side note, does anyone remember the set of TSFS drinking glasses from Taco Bell in 1984? I used to have the entire set of, I think, four but have lost them over the years.

I wish I kept my original set of 1977 Star Wars Slurpee cups. Man I loved those things.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 4, 2024 - 6:15 AM   
 By:   Ado   (Member)

The model effects, all the ships and the space station, are excellent in TSFS.
That was all excellent ILM work. All in all, it is amazing how good it looks for how little they spent

 
 Posted:   Apr 4, 2024 - 6:22 AM   
 By:   Solium   (Member)

The model effects, all the ships and the space station, are excellent in TSFS.
That was all excellent ILM work. All in all, it is amazing how good it looks for how little they spent


I agree the space station sequences were amazing and still look excellent. But the Genesis sequences look like something out of Star Trek 5. Maybe they blew their effects budget early on or there was a time crunch.

 
 Posted:   Apr 4, 2024 - 6:44 AM   
 By:   Advise & Consent   (Member)

There’s more to a film than the way it looks, TSFS is full of heart and passion.

Words of wisdom.

 
 Posted:   Apr 4, 2024 - 7:40 AM   
 By:   Octoberman   (Member)

I agree the space station sequences were amazing and still look excellent. But the Genesis sequences look like something out of Star Trek 5. Maybe they blew their effects budget early on or there was a time crunch.


It is puzzling, no question.
I was trying to think of any other film that had to portray a similar scenario--a raging inferno with people stuck in the middle of it.
And I couldn't think of any.
To be fair, I guess the safety risks inherent in the filming would practically demand that the scenes be shot on a soundstage, where the risks could be tightly controlled and minimized.

I just thought of one other amazing shot... the incineration and explosion of the primary hull.
Of course, when you go frame-by-frame, one can clearly see how it was done.
But run the shot in real time and, whew, it's still a devastating gut punch.
SO well done.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 4, 2024 - 8:02 AM   
 By:   Ado   (Member)

I agree the space station sequences were amazing and still look excellent. But the Genesis sequences look like something out of Star Trek 5. Maybe they blew their effects budget early on or there was a time crunch.


It is puzzling, no question.
I was trying to think of any other film that had to portray a similar scenario--a raging inferno with people stuck in the middle of it.
And I couldn't think of any.
To be fair, I guess the safety risks inherent in the filming would practically demand that the scenes be shot on a soundstage, where the risks could be tightly controlled and minimized.

I just thought of one other amazing shot... the incineration and explosion of the primary hull.
Of course, when you go frame-by-frame, one can clearly see how it was done.
But run the shot in real time and, whew, it's still a devastating gut punch.
SO well done.


yeah, all the ILM work was superb here, and it rivals pretty much any CGI work done now, at many many times the cost.
And the care, the emotion conveyed in the visual effects here is just something not done anymore. That explosion and the descent in the planet is some very effective stuff, dramatically. And the Bird of Prey into Vulcan, moving though the canyons and landing, it is some effective stuff.

 
 Posted:   Apr 4, 2024 - 9:09 AM   
 By:   Solium   (Member)

And the Bird of Prey into Vulcan, moving though the canyons and landing, it is some effective stuff.

The music really helped to sell that scene too. wink

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 4, 2024 - 12:18 PM   
 By:   Ado   (Member)

And the Bird of Prey into Vulcan, moving though the canyons and landing, it is some effective stuff.

The music really helped to sell that scene too. wink

agreed, some of the best stuff from Horner,

 
 Posted:   Apr 4, 2024 - 12:22 PM   
 By:   Solium   (Member)

I agree the space station sequences were amazing and still look excellent. But the Genesis sequences look like something out of Star Trek 5. Maybe they blew their effects budget early on or there was a time crunch.


It is puzzling, no question.
I was trying to think of any other film that had to portray a similar scenario--a raging inferno with people stuck in the middle of it.
And I couldn't think of any.
To be fair, I guess the safety risks inherent in the filming would practically demand that the scenes be shot on a soundstage, where the risks could be tightly controlled and minimized.

I just thought of one other amazing shot... the incineration and explosion of the primary hull.
Of course, when you go frame-by-frame, one can clearly see how it was done.
But run the shot in real time and, whew, it's still a devastating gut punch.
SO well done.


The Enterprise blowing up was certainly a wow moment when I saw it in the theater. It was ingenious to have an effect where it crumbled apart before the big explosion which made it all the more dramatic.

That said it made no sense. The warp core is supposed to overload causing a massive explosion.
Instead in TSFS they had a few tons of TNT under the captains chair.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 4, 2024 - 12:45 PM   
 By:   TheAvenger   (Member)

There’s more to a film than the way it looks, TSFS is full of heart and passion.

It also has Walter Koenig wearing a silly costume which always makes me laugh (even more so than Koenig’s acting).

 
 Posted:   Apr 4, 2024 - 12:50 PM   
 By:   Advise & Consent   (Member)

There’s more to a film than the way it looks, TSFS is full of heart and passion.

It also has Walter Koenig wearing a silly costume which always makes me laugh (even more so than Koenig’s acting).


Agreed. Beyond Scotty, the supporting characters are essentially ballast. None of them really advance the plot and their absence wouldn't have been noticed. Still an enjoyable film, though.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 4, 2024 - 12:50 PM   
 By:   TheAvenger   (Member)

THREE MEN AND A BABY was the highest grossing film of 1987 which is an impressive accomplishment.

To this day i’m staggered it beat movies like The Untouchables, Lethal Weapon, Predator and…. Ishtar!

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 4, 2024 - 12:55 PM   
 By:   TheAvenger   (Member)



The Enterprise blowing up was certainly a wow moment when I saw it in the theater. It was ingenious to have an effect where it crumbled apart before the big explosion which made it all the more dramatic.

That said it made no sense. The warp core is supposed to overload causing a massive explosion.
Instead in TSFS they had a few tons of TNT under the captains chair.


It wasn’t just the execution, the whole idea of blowing the Enterprise up was dumb. It’s literally like Kirk just goes “hmmmmm…..this is a pickle…. I know - Self destruct!”. Hey I’m no strategist but off the top of my head I can think of at least 10 alternative solutions, none of which require blowing the ship up.

 
 Posted:   Apr 4, 2024 - 1:01 PM   
 By:   Octoberman   (Member)

The Enterprise blowing up was certainly a wow moment when I saw it in the theater. It was ingenious to have an effect where it crumbled apart before the big explosion which made it all the more dramatic.
That said it made no sense. The warp core is supposed to overload causing a massive explosion.
Instead in TSFS they had a few tons of TNT under the captains chair.



If I'm recalling correctly*, there were/are/will be explosive charges planted in strategic areas all over the ship for exactly this eventuality.
(* In all the tech manuals, anyway! smile)

 
 Posted:   Apr 4, 2024 - 1:53 PM   
 By:   Trekfan   (Member)

It also has Walter Koenig wearing a silly costume which always makes me laugh (even more so than Koenig’s acting).

"The Inglorious Treksperts" did a "Star Trek 3" podcast episode in honor of its 30th anniversary this year, including Kevin Feige as a guest, and it's a solid, rousing discussion:

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/dir-4pkp8-1d7ea44c


Horner, incidentally, is praised throughout. But speaking of Chekov's outfit, it's definitely a constant pet peeve of the "Inglorious" folks over many years, calling it a "Pushkin collar" or the "Little Lord Fauntleroy outfit". What I didn't know is they mentioned in this episode that costume designer Robert Fletcher was trying to infuse some of the characters' ethnicities into the fashion choices - we see Sulu in a Komono-influenced shirt and jacket, for instance. I think a color and style misstep for Chekhov, though.

 
 Posted:   Apr 4, 2024 - 2:03 PM   
 By:   Advise & Consent   (Member)

What I didn't know is they mentioned in this episode that costume designer Robert Fletcher was trying to infuse some of the characters' ethnicities into the fashion choices - we see Sulu in a Komono-influenced shirt and jacket, for instance. I think a color and style misstep for Chekhov, though.

I would have thought that clothes in the style of that future era would have been more appropriate than the rather cliched idea of mirroring ethnicities.

 
 Posted:   Apr 4, 2024 - 2:12 PM   
 By:   Nicolai P. Zwar   (Member)

What I didn't know is they mentioned in this episode that costume designer Robert Fletcher was trying to infuse some of the characters' ethnicities into the fashion choices - we see Sulu in a Komono-influenced shirt and jacket, for instance. I think a color and style misstep for Chekhov, though.

I would have thought that clothes in the style of that future era would have been more appropriate than the rather cliched idea of mirroring ethnicities.


Or it could be the other way around, that in a future of global and unified citizenship, ethnicity is emphasized more individually in clothing etc.

 
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