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 Posted:   Jan 23, 2020 - 7:36 AM   
 By:   Damian   (Member)

Mentioned this discussion to my mother. She wanted me to say that the pork pies with eggs inside that I mentioned are called Gala Pies!

or pie with egg in big grin

 
 Posted:   Jan 23, 2020 - 7:42 AM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

However I find that good pork pies are far less common than a good sausage roll, which should be built into the equation somehow.

Hmmm. Yes. This is true.

Actually, Mrs Jehannum recently made some incredibly nice sausage rolls with Marmite & cheese pastry.


Marmite?! Are you slowly 'turning English', dude? Next you'll be relaying your love of Milk Chocolate Hobb-Nobbs. (You wouldn't have any extra of those laying about, would you?)


Er.....davey boy.... smile Do u realise by typing in bold there are about 10 of us who have hypertension coz we think a certain dreaded poster has returned. big grin

As for mcGann poser....sausage rolls. But i like the small ones. Giant ones are too much of a savoury Overdose.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 23, 2020 - 8:00 AM   
 By:   Xebec   (Member)


I always have Heinz beans on standy--the Brit kind in the blue-green can--you never know when an impromptu fry up is about to happen. The American baked beans of which you speak always need doctoring, and are best as a side with a BBQ meal which IIRC the English don't eat (add that to the list along with garlic, mustard, and iced tea)


Jim, are you saying the English don't eat garlic or mustard? That ain't so!

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 23, 2020 - 8:01 AM   
 By:   Xebec   (Member)

Three sausage rolls, baked beans, a big splodge of tomato sauce & a couple of slices of bread & butter, now that's a meal!


Swap the Tommy K for HP and yer reet.

 
 Posted:   Jan 23, 2020 - 8:04 AM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

Im getting back into heinz baked beans again lately.
Theyre good for chlorestrol but bcoz of salt not great for high blood pressure.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 23, 2020 - 8:32 AM   
 By:   Montana Dave   (Member)


Marmite?! Are you slowly 'turning English', dude? Next you'll be relaying your love of Milk Chocolate Hobb-Nobbs. (You wouldn't have any extra of those laying about, would you?)


As far as I'm aware, I am and always have been English. smile Then again I dislike tea, so maybe I'm not English after all. I certainly don't have the sweet tooth for Hob Nobs: chocolate or otherwise.

Now, back to pork pies. As Tall Guy mentioned, a good one is very difficult to come by. In my mind I can imagine the most delicious and beautiful pork pie. The reality usually falls far short of the ideal. Does anyone have any brand recommendations that don't involving scouring obscure Norfolk farmers' markets?

Criteria:

Crust - thick but not too thick; dry rather than soggy
Jelly - copious amounts are fine
Meat - certainly not the artificially pink, homogenised cylinder of mechanically recovered pig off-cuts you get in the cheapo versions


Oops. Sorry 'bout that, I mistakenly thought you, Jehannum were Christian Kuhn. I honestly don't know why. Christian was from Germany and moved to Canada, I think. For some reason, I associated you with him. Blame the Alzheimers. Everyone knows Canada banned Marmite years ago...

 
 Posted:   Jan 23, 2020 - 9:13 AM   
 By:   Last Child   (Member)

People used to show confidence in an opinion by stating they would "eat their hat" (something unappetizing) if it wasn't true. Since a hat was named after pork pies (ie the pork pie hat), this would indicate it had that negative association, making sausage rolls the favored choice.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 23, 2020 - 3:04 PM   
 By:   Graham Watt   (Member)

People used to show confidence in an opinion by stating they would "eat their hat" (something unappetizing) if it wasn't true. Since a hat was named after pork pies (ie the pork pie hat), this would indicate it had that negative association, making sausage rolls the favored choice.

I see that copies of Viz get through to the Ununited States. Good British humour (sp?) Last Child, well done. Terry Jones (may he let rip in peace) would be proud.

Yes, I've been thinking about this topic - Pork pies are more difficult to get "right", but when they're right - with jellied eels between the pig's penis and the crusty (rather than doughy) outer sarcophogus - they're sublime. And yes, as a previous poster posted (shurely poser posed?), they do tend to "fill one up"; "hit the spot", whatnot, eh old boy? After only having nibbled at it! That's the beauty of them! They're so filling and sickening you won't dare try a complete one, never mind a mini half one, with Branston's picklers in! They're great! I love them!

Sausage rolls, on the other hand, as it were - not necessarily a literal hand extremity of the arm region - can be eaten, whatever their quality, by smothering them in good ol' aforementioned Houses of Parliament brown sauce. I much prefer this to the red "communist" variety. Whatever, any old sausage in a roll with a bit of sauce splurge is still inferior to a beautiful pork pie, no Branston, no nowt.

Having said that, right now, at this very moment in time, I couldn't 'alf go a normal-quality sausage roll with gallons of HP brown sauce. Cor! You can stuff your poncey (sp?) pork pies. And some people do! It's unsightly!

A round of sausage rolls please with the applause.

 
 Posted:   Jan 23, 2020 - 3:16 PM   
 By:   Last Child   (Member)

People used to show confidence in an opinion by stating they would "eat their hat" (something unappetizing) if it wasn't true. Since a hat was named after pork pies (ie the pork pie hat), this would indicate it had that negative association, making sausage rolls the favored choice.

I see that copies of Viz get through to the Ununited States. Good British humour (sp?) Last Child, well done. Terry Jones (may he let rip in peace) would be proud.

Yes, I've been thinking about this topic - Pork pies are more difficult to get "right", but when they're right - with jellied eels between the pig's penis and the crusty (rather than doughy) outer sarcophogus - they're sublime....


Never heard of Viz, I was just making a "logical" joke, but thanks for the compliment. Your description makes haggis sound appetizing. I visited Spain briefly, and after viewing a bull fight and possibly getting sun stroke, and going to some hole-in-the-wall eatery and seeing "bull's balls" on the menu, I was sick to my stomach. Might have been a cumulative effect.

 
 Posted:   Jan 23, 2020 - 4:56 PM   
 By:   Jehannum   (Member)


Oops. Sorry 'bout that, I mistakenly thought you, Jehannum were Christian Kuhn.


Easy mistake to make. Even I'm not sure sometimes.

 
 Posted:   Jan 23, 2020 - 4:58 PM   
 By:   Jehannum   (Member)


Never heard of Viz, I was just making a "logical" joke, but thanks for the compliment.


I can confirm that your joke sounded exactly like it came from the Viz letters page.

 
 Posted:   Jan 23, 2020 - 5:32 PM   
 By:   Last Child   (Member)

I don't know what "Viz" is - the first thing that comes up in google is an anime website. Any similarity to whatever I wrote and it is coincidence.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 23, 2020 - 6:31 PM   
 By:   Xebec   (Member)

I don't know what "Viz" is - the first thing that comes up in google is an anime website. Any similarity to whatever I wrote and it is coincidence.

A long-running British comic:

http://viz.co.uk/2014/09/25/ich-bin-ein-naughty-boy/

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 24, 2020 - 7:30 AM   
 By:   paulhickling   (Member)

Three sausage rolls, baked beans, a big splodge of tomato sauce & a couple of slices of bread & butter, now that's a meal!

Rameau, you and paulhickling are the best at writing food posts.

I always have Heinz beans on standy--the Brit kind in the blue-green can--you never know when an impromptu fry up is about to happen. The American baked beans of which you speak always need doctoring, and are best as a side with a BBQ meal which IIRC the English don't eat (add that to the list along with garlic, mustard, and iced tea)

As for The McGann Mann's question: my answer is sausage rolls. Just personal preference.


Why Jim, thank you kindly. I love both of these food items, and when you get really good ones they are both wonderful to eat. There is no OR in my book! It's AND every time. The best of both is when we get a local butcher that does their own and I can point you all in the direction of one of the finest in the land of merry olde England.

I am partial to a Greggs sausage roll , and many others of their products on occasion, as they are fresh and this is when again the two things are at their best.

However, a mile or two away from me there is the South Yorkshire village of Jump. Funny name. Especially when you see a road sign saying "Jump 2 miles".... But my dad's side of the family came from there, and my mother's side from the neighboring village of Hemingfield.

There is a butcher in Jump called Turner's. And they produce the best pork pie in existence. The joke is that they're at their best when still just warm, and the jelly only just set and runs down your chin. I will say that the next day they are simply pork pies, and comparable to many others. But on the day of baking, and as fresh as above, eating one is as close to heaven as it's possible to get.

Now this butcher is a really small village butcher, from a time when there was one on almost ever few street corners. Consequently, more than the inhabitants of little Jump want these pies. And as you can see from the link, there are often long queues outside when the pies are ready.

They also do their own sausage rolls, which are very nice too. But the pies are absolutely legendary. I will be sampling both, as they are readily available at my local pubs. All three of the ones I frequent every afternoon. And certainly my last port of call, The Market in Elsecar has them fresh and warm as described above. So, lovely pies and sausage rolls washed down with lovely locally produced real ale. What a way to spend my time.

https://turnersbutchers.business.site/?fbclid=IwAR2RTMA62TjMeBEh7SLy6wcRq5-AuE9toExzNJnQrgpRBUd1HHOL7HpwvZU

https://www.facebook.com/PercyTurners/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b3WwN7b6DSo

 
 Posted:   Jan 24, 2020 - 8:02 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Good reading, paulhickling. Thanks for keeping things interesting.

I'll have to try pie and mash (elsewhere) in London when I get over there later this year:

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 24, 2020 - 9:27 AM   
 By:   Mark   (Member)

Good reading, paulhickling. Thanks for keeping things interesting.

I'll have to try pie and mash (elsewhere) in London when I get over there later this year:




I recommend F. Cooke in broadway market. They have been going for over a hundred years.

 
 Posted:   Jan 24, 2020 - 11:35 AM   
 By:   Damian   (Member)

Good reading, paulhickling. Thanks for keeping things interesting.

I'll have to try pie and mash (elsewhere) in London when I get over there later this year:




I recommend F. Cooke in broadway market. They have been going for over a hundred years.


With fresh stock, I.hope.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 24, 2020 - 11:45 AM   
 By:   paulhickling   (Member)

Now, some US folks might not be able to believe this given how small our country is, but.... I have never actually tasted pie and mash. I would love to give it a go, because we in the north have pie and peas. Now it's always been a case of almost any pie, but usually mince and onion. And of course the peas here are that great northern English classic MUSHY peas.

If we do have any potato with this it's always going to be chips. The great British stand by.

So, I would really like to get to know our cockney cousins' treat exactly as it should be. However I have reason to believe that the pies - traditionally - have little more than a smattering of meat in them, perhaps almost as meager as say potted meat. And is it not served with something called liquor? Is this not simply very weak parsley sauce?

Please stand me corrected. I'd still like to try the traditional thing, because all our regions have these 'poor' dishes, which have of course become great favourites for the simple reason that our forbears worked blooming hard to make stuff taste nice, and therefore become great because we all ended up liking them anyway!

 
 Posted:   Jan 24, 2020 - 12:17 PM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

Nathans pie n mash is the one to try in the barking road, right by the old hammers ground.
I dont mind pie n mash with parsley liquor but i prefer mine with normal garden peas and carrots.

 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2020 - 3:41 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

BBC reporter Nicola Ford could use a plate of pie and mash, the poor scrawny thing.

So pie and mash is just a London thing? Small country, vast differences, it would seem.

 
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