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 Posted:   Jun 18, 2019 - 7:55 AM   
 By:   Scott M (Oldsmith)   (Member)

Was I talking to you? Mind your own business.

You're in a forum, so yeah, it is my business. It's everyone's business. Don't be a dick.


Nope, so don't be a dick yourself.


Oy, dude, Seriously. Relax.

 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2019 - 8:01 AM   
 By:   Adam B.   (Member)

My favorite first season episode is The Last Enemy.

Dione's motorcycle costume (complete with helmet) was a hoot. Brian Johnson's effects work on this episode was spectacular. The gunship models and explosions are great. You can even see Dione's dental work when she screams "NOooooooo!" at episode's end.

 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2019 - 8:05 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Somebody needs a time out.

 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2019 - 8:14 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

I was intrigued by the pilot episode. I remembered the basics. Earth used the Moon as a nuclear waste dump, there was an explosion and on the way they went! But I had no recollection regarding the sick Alpha personal and the mystery of their illness, or the politics of the story.

I love the model work even if its not totally convincing today. And it wasn't short of effects shots. Lots of cool scenes like an Eagle being transported on rack in the "garage" as the actors are talking in the foreground. The underground tram is totally conniving. I thought it was a real thing. The miniature explosion was fantastic.

The practical effect that really blew me away was when the Alpha pilot broke the glass window with his helmet. How did they create that stunt so it perfectly cracked the window but not immediately shatter it?

I did giggle a bit at the over the counter invisible man and women model kits displayed in the doctors office.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2019 - 9:10 AM   
 By:   Nightingale   (Member)



I love the model work even if its not totally convincing today. And it wasn't short of effects shots. Lots of cool scenes like an Eagle being transported on rack in the "garage" as the actors are talking in the foreground.


Even today I wonder how they did that effect, since (to the best of my knowledge) they did not use blue screen on the show and it looks too clear (not grainy or blurry) for that OR rear projection.

 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2019 - 9:39 AM   
 By:   ZapBrannigan   (Member)

Even today I wonder how they did that effect, since (to the best of my knowledge) they did not use blue screen on the show and it looks too clear (not grainy or blurry) for that OR rear projection.

Is it on youtube for a quick look? Maybe it was all done in camera, with a miniature set really there right behind the actors' set.

 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2019 - 10:14 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Even today I wonder how they did that effect, since (to the best of my knowledge) they did not use blue screen on the show and it looks too clear (not grainy or blurry) for that OR rear projection.

Is it on youtube for a quick look? Maybe it was all done in camera, with a miniature set really there right behind the actors' set.


I don't know how they did that shot. Rear projection would be my guess. Though I did learn how they created the background shot with the rows and rows of Eagles rather recently. It's not a matte painting. They photographed one of their Eagle models then printed them out on paper and made paper cutouts.

 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2019 - 10:18 AM   
 By:   Scott M (Oldsmith)   (Member)



I love the model work even if its not totally convincing today. And it wasn't short of effects shots. Lots of cool scenes like an Eagle being transported on rack in the "garage" as the actors are talking in the foreground.


Even today I wonder how they did that effect, since (to the best of my knowledge) they did not use blue screen on the show and it looks too clear (not grainy or blurry) for that OR rear projection.


I would assume rear projection. Probably the least expensive way to do it and about as advanced as they had gotten by the early 70's. They had those monitors that were synced with the camera to do view screens and commlocks, but they weren't in color.

 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2019 - 10:37 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

They had those monitors that were synced with the camera to do view screens and commlocks, but they weren't in color.

Those effects really impressed me too.

 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2019 - 10:47 AM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

Front projection was in use in the 70s

 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2019 - 1:24 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

The best special effects in the show were Gabriel Drake's cleavage.

 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2019 - 1:33 PM   
 By:   Scott M (Oldsmith)   (Member)

They had those monitors that were synced with the camera to do view screens and commlocks, but they weren't in color.

Those effects really impressed me too.


Space:1999 immediately made US televised SF look like crap. And the 70's were not kind to American network science fiction. Logan's Run looked like cardboard and tin foil were the main materials used to create the sets and hovercraft. It wasn't until Universal spent the megabucks on Battlestar Galactica that the US caught up. Even then, they immediately had to use stock footage and standing sets. But 1999 cut corners, too. They had to. However you felt about the stories and performances, 1999 looked insanely good for the most part.

 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2019 - 6:28 PM   
 By:   johnjohnson   (Member)

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2019 - 6:58 PM   
 By:   Disco Stu   (Member)

If for nothing else, it gave us the Eagle, a stunning design that is still capable of holding its own against anything sci-fi. Only Buck Rogers' Starfighter surpasses that design as far as space ships are concerned. No wait, they share the first place.

D.S.

 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2019 - 9:18 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

The best special effects in the show were Gabriel Drake's cleavage.

Wrong British sci fi series buddy boy!

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2019 - 10:15 PM   
 By:   Paul MacLean   (Member)

The practical effect that really blew me away was when the Alpha pilot broke the glass window with his helmet. How did they create that stunt so it perfectly cracked the window but not immediately shatter it?


My guess is that the window consisted of a thin layer of glass affixed to a more durable material like plexiglass.


Another thing which made Space: 1999 very memorable, was of course Barry Gray's music. Gray added incalculable artistry and atmosphere to the series, for which he composed some of his best work.

His cues for more "mystical" episodes like "Black Sun" and "Another Time, Another Place" suffused the overall series with a mystical feel, owing to the extensive re-use of those cues in later episodes.

I can't say I am as impressed with Vic Elms' contribution to the series however. His pop/rock 1970s electric guitar riffs ruined what was otherwise an awesome main title (my understanding is that Elms was imposed on Gray, because Elms was Gerry Anderson's son-in-law).

 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2019 - 10:25 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

The best special effects in the show were Gabriel Drake's cleavage.

Wrong British sci fi series buddy boy!


Just testing you.
You passed the. Audition!

 
 Posted:   Jun 19, 2019 - 8:04 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

The best special effects in the show were Gabriel Drake's cleavage.

Wrong British sci fi series buddy boy!


Just testing you.
You passed the. Audition!


If only the ladies wore the same fishnet tops the dudes wore.

 
 Posted:   Jun 19, 2019 - 8:05 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

The practical effect that really blew me away was when the Alpha pilot broke the glass window with his helmet. How did they create that stunt so it perfectly cracked the window but not immediately shatter it?


My guess is that the window consisted of a thin layer of glass affixed to a more durable material like plexiglass.


That's a very interesting suggestion. One I wouldn't have thought of.

 
 Posted:   Jun 19, 2019 - 8:44 AM   
 By:   Scott M (Oldsmith)   (Member)


Another thing which made Space: 1999 very memorable, was of course Barry Gray's music. Gray added incalculable artistry and atmosphere to the series, for which he composed some of his best work.

His cues for more "mystical" episodes like "Black Sun" and "Another Time, Another Place" suffused the overall series with a mystical feel, owing to the extensive re-use of those cues in later episodes.

I can't say I am as impressed with Vic Elms' contribution to the series however. His pop/rock 1970s electric guitar riffs ruined what was otherwise an awesome main title (my understanding is that Elms was imposed on Gray, because Elms was Gerry Anderson's son-in-law).


I enjoyed Gray's music a LOT in the series. It was amazing how much class he brought to the series. It was also amazing how much library music was used as well. Both from other Anderson shows as well as the Chappell music library.

I really enjoyed Vic Elms' "Ring Around the Moon" score.

I know a lot of people don't like it as much, but I am also a huge fan of Derek Wadsworth's year two scores. While the later cues were wildly over the top on screen, on CD they are fantastic to listen to.

 
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