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 Posted:   Jun 30, 2020 - 7:08 AM   
 By:   Last Child   (Member)

Just to pipe in, got my copy with copious padding so it made a soft landing. As usual, the release as a whole is a stunning work of art.
I say this every time, but schools and libraries should be required to get their releases for the sake of preserving cultural history (and the sales wouldn't hurt either).


Yes, as always, La-La-Land pack their work like they really care about it. Evident when you unfurl the bubble-wrap is that they also produce it like they care about it. I got my CD centered football yesterday.


I was thinking the double-stuffed yellow bubble mailer resembled the Flying Sub. wink

 
 Posted:   Jun 30, 2020 - 9:54 AM   
 By:   Jeff Bond   (Member)

I'm not sure "In Flight" plays anywhere but in "Escape to Venice" but that cue does play shortly after the episode's opening titles and it is a very close adaptation of Goldsmith's unused title music. As far as I'm concerned that is Goldsmith's "Flying Sub Theme"--I wish I knew what the discussions were that led to it as it seems way too kinetic to match with Voyage's title sequence as it was in the second season...

 
 Posted:   Jun 30, 2020 - 10:43 AM   
 By:   Tom Servo   (Member)

I also find it fascinating that following that instance of Goldsmith's 2nd title theme going unused, he was never invited back for any subsequent Irwin Allen production, until "The Swarm" in 1978!. Allen must have oddly felt soured on Goldsmith's contributions overall, since almost all the other composers worked on all the Irwin Allen TV shows in the decade.

 
 Posted:   Jun 30, 2020 - 12:24 PM   
 By:   Scott McOldsmith   (Member)

I also find it fascinating that following that instance of Goldsmith's 2nd title theme going unused, he was never invited back for any subsequent Irwin Allen production, until "The Swarm" in 1978!. Allen must have oddly felt soured on Goldsmith's contributions overall, since almost all the other composers worked on all the Irwin Allen TV shows in the decade.

Or perhaps he was simply too busy to accept. The TV stuff Irwin would up relying on Richard LeSalle for anyway. He got John Williams for his 70's disaster films until The Swarm.

 
 Posted:   Jun 30, 2020 - 12:52 PM   
 By:   Tom Servo   (Member)

I also find it fascinating that following that instance of Goldsmith's 2nd title theme going unused, he was never invited back for any subsequent Irwin Allen production, until "The Swarm" in 1978!. Allen must have oddly felt soured on Goldsmith's contributions overall, since almost all the other composers worked on all the Irwin Allen TV shows in the decade.

Or perhaps he was simply too busy to accept. The TV stuff Irwin would up relying on Richard LeSalle for anyway. He got John Williams for his 70's disaster films until The Swarm.


It's entirely possible that Goldsmith was too busy to work on LIS, Time Tunnel and Land/Giants, but I just find it interesting that Williams, Leith Stevens. A. Courage, Mullendore, Nelson Riddle, Herman Stein and Drasnin all contributed scores to most or all of these series. I mean, I know that Lionel Newman was in charge of music at Fox at this time and managed this, but it could be that Irwin Allen made it known he didn't want Jerry invited back. Plus, Jerry was a workahoholic - if he was asked, he would've found a way to make time! smile

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 30, 2020 - 12:58 PM   
 By:   riotengine   (Member)

I also find it fascinating that following that instance of Goldsmith's 2nd title theme going unused, he was never invited back for any subsequent Irwin Allen production, until "The Swarm" in 1978!. Allen must have oddly felt soured on Goldsmith's contributions overall, since almost all the other composers worked on all the Irwin Allen TV shows in the decade.

Especially since so much of it was repurposed in subsequent episodes.

Greg Espinoza

 
 Posted:   Jun 30, 2020 - 1:22 PM   
 By:   Scott McOldsmith   (Member)



It's entirely possible that Goldsmith was too busy to work on LIS, Time Tunnel and Land/Giants, but I just find it interesting that Williams, Leith Stevens. A. Courage, Mullendore, Nelson Riddle, Herman Stein and Drasnin all contributed scores to most or all of these series. I mean, I know that Lionel Newman was in charge of music at Fox at this time and managed this, but it could be that Irwin Allen made it known he didn't want Jerry invited back. Plus, Jerry was a workahoholic - if he was asked, he would've found a way to make time! smile


I dunno, seems like he had a lot on his plate during the run of Voyage.

The Satan Bug (1965)
The Loner (TV series theme and 2 episode scores, 1965)
Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (TV series: 1 episode, 1965)
In Harm's Way (1965)
Von Ryan's Express (1965)
Morituri (1965)
The Agony and the Ecstasy (co-composer, 1965)
A Patch of Blue (1965)
Our Man Flint (1966)
The Trouble with Angels (1966)
Stagecoach (1966)
The Blue Max (1966)
Seconds (1966)
The Sand Pebbles (1966)
Warning Shot (1967)
In Like Flint (1967)
The Flim-Flam Man (1967)
Hour of the Gun (1967)
Sebastian (1968)
Planet of the Apes (1968)
The Detective (1968)
Bandolero! (1968)

Williams, while also busy, was kind of a lucky charm for Irwin and even he didn't contribute music beyond pilots after Lost in Space. None of those other composers you listed had the workload Goldsmith had. And if you had a choice between doing a feature or dashing off another score for a TV show, what would you choose?

If anything, I'd say GOLDSMITH was annoyed his theme was dropped and turned down offers. If Irwin didn't like his music, you'd never have heard it in so many other episodes of the series.

 
 Posted:   Jun 30, 2020 - 3:19 PM   
 By:   historicalproductions   (Member)

Received my set yesterday and have been spending all afternoon today listening to the wonderful music within. This has certainly made my work day much more pleasant.

Thanks again to everyone who worked on this brilliant set and to LaLaLand for bringing it to us (and shipping it so fast!).

 
 Posted:   Jun 30, 2020 - 3:21 PM   
 By:   Yavar Moradi   (Member)

I dunno, seems like he had a lot on his plate during the run of Voyage.

You're quite right! Although he wasn't "co-composer" on The Agony and the Ecstasy; that was written entirely by his friend and mentor Alex North, while he scored the short documentary film (which was shown before the feature in its roadshow presentation), The Artist Who Did Not Want to Paint... which is probably my single favorite work of his!

The Satan Bug (1965)
The Loner (TV series theme and 2 episode scores, 1965)
Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (TV series: 1 episode, 1965)
In Harm's Way (1965)
Von Ryan's Express (1965)
Morituri (1965)
The Agony and the Ecstasy (co-composer, 1965)
A Patch of Blue (1965)
Our Man Flint (1966)
The Trouble with Angels (1966)
Stagecoach (1966)
The Blue Max (1966)
Seconds (1966)
The Sand Pebbles (1966)
Warning Shot (1967)
In Like Flint (1967)
The Flim-Flam Man (1967)
Hour of the Gun (1967)
Sebastian (1968)
Planet of the Apes (1968)
The Detective (1968)
Bandolero! (1968)


In addition to your excellent list, from 1965-1968, Jerry also did:
at least one episode of Ben Casey ("Eulogy in Four Flats")
one episode (+ new series theme, which actually stuck) for Jericho ("A Jug of Wine, a Loaf of Bread - and POW")
one hourlong episode of Gunsmoke ("The Whispering Tree", an absolutely fantastic and well developed score)
one episode of The Legend of Jesse James ("Things Just Don't Happen"...we are still hunting for this one on The Goldsmith Odyssey, but found confirmation that it's the episode of the series he scored)
one episode of CBS Playhouse (basically a feature length TV movie: "The People Next Door" -- which was a dry run for his Chinatown theme!)
the unsold pilot Nick Quarry (thanks for releasing that, FSM!)

Williams, while also busy, was kind of a lucky charm for Irwin and even he didn't contribute music beyond pilots after Lost in Space. None of those other composers you listed had the workload Goldsmith had. And if you had a choice between doing a feature or dashing off another score for a TV show, what would you choose?

Very good point, and also Williams wasn't producing *nearly* as much music in this period as Goldsmith was.

If anything, maybe GOLDSMITH was annoyed his theme was dropped and turned down offers.

You may be right; who knows? I'd be annoyed myself, especially if I gave the producers a second version to address their comments, and they *still* didn't go for it... maybe being offered a full on feature by the man behind the big hits The Poseidon Adventure and The Towering Inferno (he didn't have those under his belt while the TV shows were still going on) was a different matter, and (along with a feature-sized paycheck) made Jerry willing to work with Irwin Allen again?

Yavar

 
 Posted:   Jun 30, 2020 - 3:32 PM   
 By:   Tom Servo   (Member)



It's entirely possible that Goldsmith was too busy to work on LIS, Time Tunnel and Land/Giants, but I just find it interesting that Williams, Leith Stevens. A. Courage, Mullendore, Nelson Riddle, Herman Stein and Drasnin all contributed scores to most or all of these series. I mean, I know that Lionel Newman was in charge of music at Fox at this time and managed this, but it could be that Irwin Allen made it known he didn't want Jerry invited back. Plus, Jerry was a workahoholic - if he was asked, he would've found a way to make time! smile


I dunno, seems like he had a lot on his plate during the run of Voyage.

The Satan Bug (1965)
The Loner (TV series theme and 2 episode scores, 1965)
Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (TV series: 1 episode, 1965)
In Harm's Way (1965)
Von Ryan's Express (1965)
Morituri (1965)
The Agony and the Ecstasy (co-composer, 1965)
A Patch of Blue (1965)
Our Man Flint (1966)
The Trouble with Angels (1966)
Stagecoach (1966)
The Blue Max (1966)
Seconds (1966)
The Sand Pebbles (1966)
Warning Shot (1967)
In Like Flint (1967)
The Flim-Flam Man (1967)
Hour of the Gun (1967)
Sebastian (1968)
Planet of the Apes (1968)
The Detective (1968)
Bandolero! (1968)

Williams, while also busy, was kind of a lucky charm for Irwin and even he didn't contribute music beyond pilots after Lost in Space. None of those other composers you listed had the workload Goldsmith had. And if you had a choice between doing a feature or dashing off another score for a TV show, what would you choose?

If anything, I'd say GOLDSMITH was annoyed his theme was dropped and turned down offers. If Irwin didn't like his music, you'd never have heard it in so many other episodes of the series.


Hey, I agree with you on those points and Goldsmith was absolutely annoyed, according to what is reported in Jeff's liner notes. I'm just saying that based on what was also mentioned in Jeff's liner notes for this set, that upon hearing Goldsmith's new theme, Allen was heard to say something to the effect "That may be your idea of music, but it isn't mine", and this might have set Allen's mind against using Goldsmith afterwards. So, it was a mutual annoyance on both their parts! smile

And I don't think you can say that Williams didn't contribute much after LIS - he composed two main themes for Land of the Giants, plus it's pilot score, along with the main theme and pilot score for The Time Tunnel. I'd say that's a fair amount on contribution on the non-LIS series.

 
 Posted:   Jun 30, 2020 - 5:47 PM   
 By:   Scott McOldsmith   (Member)



Hey, I agree with you on those points and Goldsmith was absolutely annoyed, according to what is reported in Jeff's liner notes. I'm just saying that based on what was also mentioned in Jeff's liner notes for this set, that upon hearing Goldsmith's new theme, Allen was heard to say something to the effect "That may be your idea of music, but it isn't mine", and this might have set Allen's mind against using Goldsmith afterwards. So, it was a mutual annoyance on both their parts! smile


I'm not trying to argue and in all fairness to me, my set is taking a f'n week (so far) to travel the country, so I haven't had a chance to read the notes or hear anything other than the samples. And it's killing meeeeee... So, I'll bow to your good fortune and access to the notes. smile


And I don't think you can say that Williams didn't contribute much after LIS - he composed two main themes for Land of the Giants, plus it's pilot score, along with the main theme and pilot score for The Time Tunnel. I'd say that's a fair amount on contribution on the non-LIS series.


Well, when you consider though that he did four full scores for LIS, just the pilot for The Time Tunnel and was asked to bail Land of the Giants out of doo-doo after two other composers were attached (and man his score for The Crash elevates that from a decent pilot to a chilling nightmare of fun) and only did themes...well, compared to Leith Stevens and Paul Sawtell or Richard LaSalle, Williams really didn't contribute much music - volume wise - to the Irwin Allen SF shows after LIS. However, what he did was absolutely brilliant.

 
 Posted:   Jul 1, 2020 - 3:39 PM   
 By:   Scott McOldsmith   (Member)

And because out of the 2 dozen items I've ordered since COVID this ONE THING I've been anxiously awaiting gets delivered...elsewhere. The Post Office tracking says it reached my house but nope. No deliveries at that time. Not even on my Ring camera.

Really....this. One. Thing. Voyage never has an easy journey to me.

Let's try this dance again...

 
 Posted:   Jul 1, 2020 - 7:04 PM   
 By:   ZapBrannigan   (Member)

And because out of the 2 dozen items I've ordered since COVID this ONE THING I've been anxiously awaiting gets delivered...elsewhere. The Post Office tracking says it reached my house but nope. No deliveries at that time. Not even on my Ring camera.

Really....this. One. Thing. Voyage never has an easy journey to me.

Let's try this dance again...



Maybe a neighbor will bring it over. But you're getting this, come what may. smile

 
 Posted:   Jul 2, 2020 - 7:21 AM   
 By:   Scott McOldsmith   (Member)

That's my hope....just common courtesy and what I do when it's just down the street I'll be satisfied of they just leave it for the carrier to deliver correctly.

 
 Posted:   Jul 2, 2020 - 11:18 PM   
 By:   Ray Worley   (Member)

After getting my copy and giving it a careful listening, I was happy to note that Jerry Goldsmith kind of got the last laugh, in a way. It's mentioned in the liner notes, but stands out in the listening...most of the composers referenced Jerry's 2nd season theme much more often than Sawtell's in their underscores. I caught many references, often quite subtle.
I have no clue, but I wonder if any money came to JG when his theme was referenced this way. I doubt it since it's usually only a few notes and I'm sure the royalty system back then was designed to not pay out for anything like that. My guess is you got paid once for the original composition and that was it, but I really don't know.
Any experts here that could chime in?

Terrific release BTW. I was on the fence because I was never super invested in the show back then. I found a lot of it quite silly even for a junior high/high school kid. I'm glad I gave in, because there is a lot of excellent music.

 
 Posted:   Jul 3, 2020 - 5:52 AM   
 By:   Last Child   (Member)

 
 Posted:   Jul 3, 2020 - 10:15 AM   
 By:   Jeff Bond   (Member)

It's a good question about Goldsmith getting paid for the uses of his theme by other composers--he is credited in the cue sheets for these, and the whole point of cue sheets as far as I know is to document the use of composers' work in film scores so that they can get paid for it. So I would assume Goldsmith did get money from at least some of the uses of his Voyage theme. BTW probably my favorite use of Goldsmith's theme comes from Alexander Courage in "Sieg Heil" from "The Cyborg"--this is a lengthy cue that plays Goldsmith's theme as counterpoint to Sawtell's against a rhythm for snare drums and woodwinds. The version included on the set is actually considerably longer than what plays in the episode and I just love having it.

 
 Posted:   Jul 3, 2020 - 10:41 AM   
 By:   Tom Servo   (Member)

I've certainly been enjoying this set over the past week, especially as it's pretty much all new music for me, outside of Goldsmith's episode score for "Jonah and the Whale". The Leith Stevens scores are the most all around engaging and entertaining examples, especially his music for "The X Factor" and "Blow Up", but I also really love the jazzy rhythms in "Time Bomb" and "The Left-Handed Man".

I was never that much a fan of Paul Sawtell, even his music for the movie, but I find more to enjoy in his "Eleven Days to Zero" score here, especially in its more fluid, impressionistic moments.

Lennie Hayton's "...And Five Of Us Are Left" is also a real highlight, a charming and memorable score throughout.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 3, 2020 - 12:47 PM   
 By:   MMM   (Member)

"It's a good question about Goldsmith getting paid for the uses of his theme by other composers--he is credited in the cue sheets for these, and the whole point of cue sheets as far as I know is to document the use of composers' work in film scores so that they can get paid for it. So I would assume Goldsmith did get money from at least some of the uses of his Voyage theme."

Yes, you are correct. Cue sheets are so that composers and the publishers of the music will get paid whenever the show is aired and the airing of the program is sampled by the performing rights society (in the U.S., ASCAP and BMI). Sometimes a "Main Title" would even pay at a higher rate than the rest of the background music, but I don't think that applied to television shows back then -- primarily to movies. Cue sheets are also used when music is licensed for ancillary uses, such as when a subsequent production shows a clip from the original show on a television set or something. The cue sheets help the music licensors understand exactly whose music they are reusing.

 
 Posted:   Jul 3, 2020 - 1:49 PM   
 By:   Scott McOldsmith   (Member)

Goldsmith must have gotten a number of checks since his "Jonah" music was used to close off the episodes a LOT.

 
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