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The latest release from Intrada is a greatly expanded, two-disc edition of Trevor Jones' symphonic score for the 1983 swashbuckler NATE AND HAYES, starring Tommy Lee Jones and Michael O'Keefe.


Varese Sarabande has announced a limited edition CD of Gary Chang's score for FIREWALKER, the light-hearted 1986 action adventure from director J. Lee Thompson (The Guns of Navarone), teaming Chuck Norris and Lou Gossett Jr.; the CD features the same cues as Varese's original LP.


CDS AVAILABLE THIS WEEK

Battle of Okinawa - Masaru Sato - Cinema-Kan (import)
Desperado Outpost/Westward Desperado - Masaru Sato - Cinema-Kan (import)
Into the Badlands: Season 2 - Trevor Yulie - Varese Sarabande
James Horner: The Classics - James Horner - Sony
Nate and Hayes
- Trevor Jones - Intrada Special Collection
Teen Titans Go! To the Movies
 - Jared Faber - WaterTower


IN THEATERS TODAY

BlacKkKlansman - Terence Blanchard
The Captain - Martin Todsharow - Score CD on Milan (import)
Dog Days - Craig Wedren, Matt Novack
The Meg - Harry Gregson-Williams
The Miseducation of Cameron Post - Julian Wass
A Prayer Before Dawn - Nicolas Becker
Slender Man - Ramin Djawadi, Brandon Campbell - Score CD-R due Aug. 17 on Sony


COMING SOON

August 17
Firewalker - Gary Chang - Varese Sarabande
Mission: Impossible - Fallout - Lorne Balfe - La-La Land
The Prisoner of Zenda - Henry Mancini - La-La Land
Slender Man - Ramin Djawadi, Brandon Campbell - Sony [CD-R]
August 24
The Darkest Minds
 - Benjamin Wallfisch - Milan
Hurricane
 - Nino Rota - Varese Sarabande
Legion: Season 2
 - Jeff Russo - Lakeshore
Westworld: Season 2 - Ramin Djawadi - WaterTower
August 31
Giuda Uccide Il Venderi
 - Nico Fidenco - Kronos
Here We Go Again, Rubinot 
- Andrew Powell - Kronos
Jack Ryan - Ramin Djawadi - La-La Land
Kin - Mogwai - Rock Action (import)
Le Stagioni Del Nostro Amore/Padre di Famiglia
 - Carlo Rustichelli - Saimel

The Man Who Killed Don Quixote
 - Roque Banos - Saimel
M'esperaras?
 - Arnau Bataller - Saimel
Q - The Winged Serpent
 - Robert O. Ragland - Kronos
Saving Private Ryan - John Williams - La-La Land
Yellowstone - Brian Tyler - Sony [CD-R]
September 7
Sounder 
- Taj Mahal - Varese Sarabande
Septmeber 14
Doctor Who: The Five Doctors
 - Peter Howell - Silva
Date Unknown
Accident Man
 - Sean Murray - Dragon's Domain
Advise and Consent 
- Jerry Fielding - Kritzerland
Doctor Who: The Invasion
- Don Harper, Brian Hodgson - Silva
Not Afraid, Not Afraid
 - Gabriel Yared - Caldera
The Return of Swamp Thing
 - Chuck Cirino - Dragon's Domain


THIS WEEK IN FILM MUSIC HISTORY

August 10 - Brian Easdale born (1909)
August 10 - Mischa Bakaleinikoff died (1960)
August 10 - Ennio Morricone begins recording his score for So Fine (1981)
August 10 - Isaac Hayes died (2008)
August 11 - Ron Grainer born (1922)
August 11 - Raymond Leppard born (1927)
August 11 - Miklos Rozsa begins recording his score for The Light Touch (1951)
August 11 - Joe Jackson born (1954)
August 11 - Richard Shores begins recording his score for The Wild Wild West episode “The Night of the Eccentrics” (1966)
August 11 - Bill Conti begins recording his score for Five Days from Home (1977)
August 11 - Toby Chu born (1977)
August 11 - Don Davis begins recording his score for The Matrix Revolutions (2003)
August 12 - David Lee born (1926)
August 12 - David Munrow born (1942)
August 12 - Victor Young begins recording his score for The Accused (1948)
August 12 - Mark Knopfler born (1949)
August 12 - Pat Metheny born (1954)
August 12 - Peter Peter born (1960)
August 12 - Jerry Goldsmith begins recording his score to The Traveling Executioner (1970)
August 12 - Hugo Montenegro records his only Mission: Impossible episode score, for “The Rebel” (1970)
August 12 - Marty Paich died (1995)
August 12 - Zacarias M. de la Riva born (1972)
August 13 - John Ireland born (1879)
August 13 - Dennis Farnon born (1923)
August 13 - John Cacavas born (1930)
August 13 - Richard Shores records his score for The Wild Wild West episode “The Night of the Big Blackmail” (1968)
August 13 - Gerald Fried writes his final Mission: Impossible score, for “The Code” (1969)
August 13 - Jerry Goldsmith begins recording his score for Warlock (1988)
August 13 - Jerry Goldsmith begins recording his score to Star Trek: Nemesis (2002)
August 13 - John Ottman begins recording his score to Gothika (2003)
August 13 - Roque Banos records his score for Oldboy (2013)
August 14 - Lee Zahler born (1893)
August 14 - Edmund Meisel born (1894)
August 14 - James Horner born (1953)
August 14 - Oscar Levant died (1972)
August 14 - Michael McCormack born (1973)
August 15 - Jacques Ibert born (1890)
August 15 - Ned Washington born (1901)
August 15 - Jimmy Webb born (1946)
August 15 - Lalo Schifrin records his score for the Mission: Impossible episode “Memory” (1966)
August 15 - Henry Mancini begins recording his score for Harry and Son (1983)
August 15 - Bruce Broughton begins recording his score for George Washington II: The Forging of a Nation (1986) 
August 15 - Ronald Stein died (1988)
August 15 - Ron Jones records his pilot score for the animated Superman series (1988)
August 16 - John Williams records the third season theme for Lost in Space (1967)
August 16 - Bruno Nicolai died (1991)
August 16 - Miles Goodman died (1996)
August 16 - Tadashi Hattori died (2008)
August 16 - Alan Silvestri wins Emmys for Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey’s main title theme and its premiere episode score; David Arnold and Michael Price win for Sherlock’s “His Last Vow” (2014)

DID THEY MENTION THE MUSIC?

CELL - Marcelo Zarvos
 
"While King's novel was written before the smart-phone became quite such a ubiquitous modern addiction, screenwriter Adam Alleca (2009's 'The Last House on the Left' remake) has made no attempt to bring the narrative up to date. Cell phones are merely the device which administers the shock; despite the inference of the premise, there's no real exploration, sub-textual or otherwise, of how constant connection to our phones may be turning us into social zombies, or how the internet-enabled, globally connected hive mind can be as destructive as it is empowering. Instead, 'Cell' plays like the most straightforward of horror, complete with endless exposition as dialogue and frequent leaps of logic which demonstrate this may have been better as a mini-series. Aesthetically, too, it's just as dull and predictable, with a now-familiar washed out post-apocalyptic colour palette, over-eager music cues and shaky effects."
 
Nikki Baughan, The List
 
HAROLD AND LILLIAN: A HOLLYWOOD LOVE STORY - David Lebolt
 
"With a relationship, a family and two careers to justify, the documentary seems to cover its massive territory even though it does so by sometimes being discombobulated or flat. 'Harold and Lillian' even starts out with a lack of promise as it establishes that it will more or less be talking heads recalling previous events, but soon gains charisma with who speaks on camera (Mel Brooks, Danny Devito, Francis Ford Coppola, along with legendary storyboard artists) and the many fascinating tales Harold and Lillian offer. The documentary offers a sweet cinematic touch when it visualizes certain passages in their relationship with storyboard animation, and every now and then shows us the crafty, hilarious cards that Harold made for Lillian on various occasions. The spiritual guide for Raim’s collection of their lives proves to be Pixar’s 'Up,' given Lillian’s memory book that bookends the story, and music that echoes Michael Giacchino’s score for that film."
 
Nick Allen, RogerEbert.com

LIKE CRAZY - Carlo Virzi

"The story’s most complex piece of the puzzle (spoilers ahead) is Donatella’s relationship with her young son, who was put up for adoption. An encounter between Beatrice, acting as an embassy, and the boy’s adoptive parents is beautifully played and extremely touching and there’s an echo of this in a later scene on a sunny beach that similarly finds just the right balance between the wistfulness caused by lost opportunities and gratitude for the moments we do get. But these highlights -- together with a striking sequence on a boardwalk where the two ladies find themselves at dusk -- are strong enough to stand on their own, while Virzi feels the need to prop them up with garishly desaturated flashbacks that fill in every blank, robbing the latter reels of some of the story’s more suggestive poetry moments while risking to turn a heartfelt subplot into something borderline maudlin (the predominance of the flute on the soundtrack doesn’t help in this regard)."
 
Boyd van Hoeij, Hollywood Reporter
 
LOWRIDERS - Bryan Senti
 
"Director de Montreuil can be a little too eager to whip his handheld cameras fore and aft with Greengrassian urgency, giving otherwise calm scenes a needless jumpiness and filling the foregrounds with too much visual noise, but the performances he elicits are rock-solid across the board, and his location choices couldn’t be better. The care that has been lavished on all the candy-colored Impalas is obvious, and the score from Bryan Senti ties together the film’s soundtrack of hip-hop and golden oldies with unobtrusive ease."
 
Andrew Barker, Variety

SACRED - Edward Bilous
 
"While 'Sacred' clearly is designed more to celebrate than to critique, it’s perhaps a shame that the film is not a little more hard-hitting, especially as the more ambivalent segments are often the most memorable. A lengthy section in Angola prison in Louisiana highlights how even those inmates whose conversion seems sincere are also desirous of earthly rewards -- such as early release -- for their newfound piety. Later, an African mango seller talks of having lost her faith when her family died. The only atheist in a film full of believers, she all but rolls her eyes at the mosque and the church behind her before posing a Big Question: 'Why would God let poor people die?' The film lets the query dangle. Then, under the soothing violin arpeggios of Edward Bilous’ fine score, it simply moves on, like a stone skimming prettily over deep and treacherous waters, to observe some new act of devotion half a world away."
 
Jessica Kiang, Variety

WHISKY GALORE! - Patrick Doyle

"This fresh take on 'Whisky Galore!' makes good use of an ideal location in Portsoy, Aberdeenshire and is crisply shot by Nigel Willoughby, with a jaunty Patrick Doyle score. But the real star is McDougall’s script -- wry and acerbic without ever resorting to crude caricatures. A newly added subplot, alluding to a missing box of official secrets detailing royal connections to Nazism, is skillfully integrated, although providing a satisfying resolution to the multiple plotlines proves to be MacKinnon’s undoing in a rather low-key finale."
 
Eddie Harrison, The List
 
"Cue the expected hijinks -- or, more accurately, mediumjinks, since MacKinnon (working in a blander register than in such earlier outings as 'Hideous Kinky' and 'Pure') conducts the farce at a pretty relaxed pace, with proceedings further mollified by the syrupy flute-and-fiddle lilt of Patrick Doyle’s score. (Landing just shy of 100 minutes, the film is far from a chore, but feels palpably less buzzed than the 82-minute original.) Izzard, riffing as much on British sitcom archetypes from the likes of 'Dad’s Army' as on Basil Radford’s original characterization, makes for a gently amusing stooge, though his antic comic repertoire is hardly stretched. Most winning among the villagers is Guthrie, recently a standout in Terence Davies’ 'Sunset Song,' his sweet sad-sack demeanor gaining a little fire once the alcohol is found; if only the rest of 'Whisky Galore!' followed suit."
 
Guy Lodge, Variety

THE NEXT TEN DAYS IN L.A.

Screenings of older films, at the following L.A. movie theaters: AMPASAmerican Cinematheque: AeroAmerican Cinematheque: EgyptianArclightLACMALaemmleNew BeverlyNuart and UCLA.

August 10
GHOST IN THE SHELL (Kenji Kawai) [Nuart]
HOUSE OF WAX (David Buttolph), THE MAD MAGICIAN (Emil Newman, Arthur Lange) [Cinematheque: Aero]
THE ROOM (Mladen Milicevic) [Cinematheque: Egyptian]
SWEET CHARITY (Cy Coleman, Joseph Gershenson) [UCLA]
WANDA (Dave Mullaney) [Cinematheque: Egyptian]

August 11
BLACK PANTHER (Ludwig Goransson) [Cinematheque: Aero]
HEAVEN CAN WAIT (Alfred Newman), DESIGN FOR LIVING [UCLA]
MAN IN THE DARK (Ross DiMaggio), INFERNO (Paul Sawtell) [Cinemathque: Aero]
WANDA (Dave Mullaney) [Cinematheque: Egyptian]

August 12
CABARET (John Kander, Ralph Burns) [UCLA]
CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON [Cinematheque: Aero]
DIAL M FOR MURDER (Dimitri Tiomkin) [Cinematheque: Aero]
INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS (Carmen Dragon), THE THING FROM ANOTHER WORLD (Dimitri Tiomkin) [Cinematheque: Egyptian]
OLD YELLER (Oliver Wallace) [UCLA]
WANDA (Dave Mullaney) [Cinematheque: Egyptian]

August 13
BULLITT (Lalo Schifrin) [Arclight Culver City]
GREASE (Warren Casey, Jim Jacobs, Louis St. Louis) [AMPAS]
TOP GUN (Harold Faltermeyer) [Arclight Sherman Oaks]

August 14
THE CIRCUS OF LIFE [LACMA]
THE IRON GIANT (Michael Kamen) [Arclight Santa Monica]
JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR (Andrew Lloyd Webber, Andre Previn) [Arclight Sherman Oaks]
THE LORD OF THE RINGS: THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING (Howard Shore) [Arclight Hollywood]
MR. BLANDINGS BUILDS HIS DREAM HOUSE (Leigh Harline), CHARADE (Henry Mancini) [Laemmle NoHo]
MR. BLANDINGS BUILDS HIS DREAM HOUSE (Leigh Harline), CHARADE (Henry Mancini) [Laemmle Royal]

August 16
THE LAST MOVIE [Cinematheque: Egyptian]
THE SPY WHO LOVED ME (Marvin Hamlisch) [Laemmle NoHo]
THE STUNT MAN (Dominic Frontiere) [Cinematheque: Aero]

August 17
APOCALYPSE NOW (Carmine Coppola, Francis Coppola) [Cinematheque: Egyptian]
STAR 80 (Ralph Burns), LENNY (Ralph Burns) [UCLA]
SUPER TROOPERS (38 Special) [Nuart]
THX 1138 (Lalo Schifrin), DUEL (Billy Goldenberg) [Cinematheque: Aero]

August 18
BLUE VELVET (Angelo Badalamenti), RIVER'S EDGE (Jurgen Kneiper) [Cinemathque: Egyptian]
THE PAJAMA GAME (Richard Adler, Jerry Ross, Nelson Riddle, Buddy Bregman), DAMN YANKEES (Richard Adler, Jerry Ross, Ray Heindorf) [UCLA]
PLAYTIME (Francis Lemarque) [Cinematheque: Aero]
SHE DONE HIM WRONG [Cinematheque: Egyptian]

August 19
THE DEER HUNTER (Stanley Myers) [Cinematheque: Aero]
NIGHT TIDE (David Raksin), EASY RIDER [Cinematheque: Egyptian]


THINGS I'VE HEARD, READ, SEEN OR WATCHED LATELY

Every year, the Los Angeles Conservancy holds a screening series called "Last Remaining Seats," where they present classic films in 35mm screenings at the surviving picture palaces in the Los Angeles area. My favorite of these theaters is the Los Angeles, which frequently pops up as a filming location (including in such recent films as Hail, Caesar!, Lords of Salem and The Neon Demon). It's not as pristinely restored as the United Artists theater at the Ace Hotel, but it's still a remarkable building, with its massive auditorium, towering Versailles-styled lobby, and assortment of underground rooms that originally included a restaurant, a ballroom and children's playroom.

The last two years, I saw Some Like It Hot and Easter Parade there, and this year's Last Remaining Seats screening was an excellent 35mm print of The Birds (that afternoon they screened Who Framed Roger Rabbit, with Joanna Cassidy and others from the film in person). It was probably the first Hitchcock film I ever saw -- on TV, during my childhood, and one of the reasons it especially caught my attention was its Bodega Bay setting, a few hours up the coast from my Marin County home. As you might expect, I found it pretty scary as a child, and the scene where Jessica Tandy finds the neighboring farmer's corpse, complete with bloody, eyeless sockets, was arguably the most startlingly gruesome moment in mainstream cinema of the time.

Coming after a trio of classics - Vertigo, North by Northwest and Psycho -- The Birds' flaws make it seem like something a step down for the director, but though it may lack the "masterpiece" status of those other three features, seeing it in the wake of 2001's re-release I feel like it is nearly as experimental and groundbreaking a movie.

The strangeness starts with the opening credits. As with the rest of the film, there is no music over the main title, just the electronic soundscape (synthetically re-creating the cries of birds), created by Remi Gassman and Oskar Sala under the supervision of Bernard Herrmann (I believe the only music heard in the film are brief source pieces -- some music on the radio, Hedren playing the piano, and the children singing in the schoolhouse). When the film begins proper, in San Francisco's Union Square (the central location for Coppola's The Conversation, 11 years later), it seems to be a romantic comedy, with feckless heiress 'Tippi' Hedren in a pet store, playing a prank on a handsome lawyer (the perennially underrated Rod Taylor) which quickly backfires.

After meeting Taylor's friendly neighbor (comedy stalwart Richard Deacon, "Mel Cooley" of The Dick Van Dyke Show), Hedren drives up the coast under the gloomily gorgeous matte-painted skies of Albert Whitlock, and soon we don't seem to be in a comedy at all, as the birds slowly begin to attack -- first just Hedren, then Taylor's family, and finally the entire town.

[A side note on matte painting and Albert Whitlock -- Whitlock is one of the all-time great visual effects artists, and people who (unlike me) actually know a lot about matte painting claim that one of his special talents was his ability to paint in an impressionistic way that would ultimately look more photorealistic on film than a more traditionally detailed painting would. (Similarly, I learned recently that Blade Runner matte painter Matthew Yuricich had a particular instinct for knowing how the different generations of film processing would change the colors of his paintings, and would counteract that effect in his color choice). Torn Curtain is one of Hitchcock's weakest films, but it does feature a remarkable demonstratoin of Whitlock's art -- when Paul Newman is followed through a museum, all the wide shots of the rooms are mostly Whitlock's paintings, with Newman filmed only on partial sets. It was especially nice to see The Birds on film again since, the last time I saw it in the theater, it was from a digital source, and the extra level of visual detail made that amazing Whitlock shot overlooking the town as the gas station burns actually look like a painting for the first time.]

A more traditional thriller from the '50s and '60s would explain why the birds are attacking, would feature scenes of government and/or military plotting their defense strategy, but The Birds has none of that. For the rest of the film, we follow these romantic-comedy characters as they try to survive an inexplicable, living nightmare, to a climactic resolution that is no resolution at all (there are no end credits, not even "The End," just a final fade out).

There's one random moment that's become my favorite in the film [spoiler alert]. After the attack on the children and on the center of town, Taylor and Hedren return to Suzanne Pleshette's house only to find her bird-pecked corpse in the front yard. Taylor's grief-stricken reaction to seeing his old friend's dead body is remarkably real and moving, the kind of genuinely emotional moment one doesn't necessarily associate with Hitchcock's movies.

I couldn't say that The Birds changed cinema the way 2001 did, but it's a remarkable achievement for its time (and, I think, it was actually a major box-office hit -- Wikipedia lists it as the 8th highest grossing film of 1963, between Son of Flubber and Dr. No. Now there's a time capsule for you).

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Comments (9):Log in or register to post your own comments
Totally agree with you on The Birds--very underrated movie and the lack of the conventional elements you mention is what makes it great for me. And in terms of its "emotional realism," I would add the performance of the young Veronica Cartwright. Even as a kid I remember being chilled to the bone by her tearful description of what happened to Pleshette's character ("...and they covered her!"). Cartwright, even as an adult in Alien, performed emotional breakdowns more convincingly than just about any other actor I can think of.

I would add the performance of the young Veronica Cartwright. Even as a kid I remember being chilled to the bone by her tearful description of what happened to Pleshette's character ("...and they covered her!"). Cartwright, even as an adult in Alien, performed emotional breakdowns more convincingly than just about any other actor I can think of.

The Birds, Alien, Invasion Of The Body Snatchers, The Witches Of Eastwick...Cartwright is always getting terrorized in movies, and she depicts the hysteria of genuine terror better than any actress I can think of.

Cartwright does do hysteria superbly, especially in Alien (she could have played the Shelley Duvall role in The Shining). When I see The Birds these days, it sounds like all of her lines were re-looped (maybe for production reasons), but as far as I can tell she did her own looping.

She was the special guest at the Birds screening I went to, but it was kind of an awkward interview, with a poor sound system and a less than great moderator.

Back in the 1980's, filmmaker Walton Dornisch made a short documentary, "Albert Whitlock: Master of Illusion," which demonstrates that impressionistic technique you mention, but which unfortunately does not seem to be available for home video. Perhaps some appropriate Criterion Collection disc in the future will include it as supplemental material.

It's ironically coincidental to read your comment on the human emotion in Hitchcock characters, as I was just reading an old interview with screenwriter John Michael Hayes (REAR WINDOW, THE TROUBLE WITH HARRY, etc.) in which he expresses some fascinating opinions about what he perceived to be Hitchcock's coldness and misanthropy and how it was reflected in his treatment of his characters.

Just a quick aside about that image of the farmer's corpse face in THE BIRDS: part of its shock impact derives from it being presented not in a single close-up but in a sequence of three quick close-ups, each one boring in closer than the one before -- a technique first (I believe) used by James Whale to introduce Karloff's monstrous face in FRANKENSTEIN.

I would add the performance of the young Veronica Cartwright. Even as a kid I remember being chilled to the bone by her tearful description of what happened to Pleshette's character ("...and they covered her!"). Cartwright, even as an adult in Alien, performed emotional breakdowns more convincingly than just about any other actor I can think of.

The Birds, Alien, Invasion Of The Body Snatchers, The Witches Of Eastwick...Cartwright is always getting terrorized in movies, and she depicts the hysteria of genuine terror better than any actress I can think of.


and x-files as well. quite a genre-iffic resume.

There is a great blog exploration of Albert Whitlock's talents here:

http://nzpetesmatteshot.blogspot.com/2010/09/albert-whitlock-scrapbook-of-memorable.html

Back in the 1980's, filmmaker Walton Dornisch made a short documentary, "Albert Whitlock: Master of Illusion," which demonstrates that impressionistic technique you mention, but which unfortunately does not seem to be available for home video. Perhaps some appropriate Criterion Collection disc in the future will include it as supplemental material.

It's ironically coincidental to read your comment on the human emotion in Hitchcock characters, as I was just reading an old interview with screenwriter John Michael Hayes (REAR WINDOW, THE TROUBLE WITH HARRY, etc.) in which he expresses some fascinating opinions about what he perceived to be Hitchcock's coldness and misanthropy and how it was reflected in his treatment of his characters.

Just a quick aside about that image of the farmer's corpse face in THE BIRDS: part of its shock impact derives from it being presented not in a single close-up but in a sequence of three quick close-ups, each one boring in closer than the one before -- a technique first (I believe) used by James Whale to introduce Karloff's monstrous face in FRANKENSTEIN.


I remember seeing a documentary years ago that pointed out that the farmer's empty eye sockets were not make-up, but rather a Whitlock glass painting between the camera and the actor.

I would add the performance of the young Veronica Cartwright. Even as a kid I remember being chilled to the bone by her tearful description of what happened to Pleshette's character ("...and they covered her!"). Cartwright, even as an adult in Alien, performed emotional breakdowns more convincingly than just about any other actor I can think of.

The Birds, Alien, Invasion Of The Body Snatchers, The Witches Of Eastwick...Cartwright is always getting terrorized in movies, and she depicts the hysteria of genuine terror better than any actress I can think of.


She is excellent and should be in more movies.

Bird attack on Brenner's house was scary as hell the screeching bird noises had everyone on tenterhooks, me included, just before the invasion Cathy did ask about the lovebirds safety the response was wicked but understandable.

When I 1st saw this movie & Cathy being attacked 3 times, I was sure she was done for in one of those scenes. Cartwright's performance was very mature for her age - special.

Ditto Alien splendid actress.

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October 20
Adolph Deutsch born (1897)
Frank Churchill born (1901)
Lucien Moraweck died (1973)
Ron Jones records his score for the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode "Booby Trap" (1989)
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