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Next week, La-La Land will release a two-disc set of music from the 1988 TV revival of MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE, featuring music from episodes scored by Lalo Schifrin and Ron Jones. The label plans to release Lorne Balfe's score for the just-released sixth feature in the movie franchise, MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE - FALLOUT, on August 14th.


CDS AVAILABLE THIS WEEK

Dagora the Space Monster
 - Akira Ifukube - Toho (import)
The Equalizer 2 - Harry Gregson-Williams - Sony [CD-R]
Flowers II - Arthur Sharpe - Silva (import)
The Imperial Navy
 - Katsuhisa Hattori - Cinema-Kan (import)
The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers: Complete Recording [re-release]
 - Howard Shore - Rhino
Mosaic - David Holmes - Touch Sensitive (import)
Puzzle - Dustin O'Halloran - Sony 
Varan the Unbelievable
 - Akira Ifukube - Toho (import)


IN THEATERS TODAY

Dark Money - Miriam Cutler
Far from the Tree - Yo La Tengo, Nico Muhly
Hot Summer Nights - Will Bates
Mission: Impossible - Fallout - Lorne Balfe - Score CD due Aug. 14 on La-La Land
Puzzle - Dustin O'Halloran - Score CD on Sony
The Row - Jared Beckerman
Scotty and the Secret History of Hollywood - Jane Antonia Cornish
Teen Titans Go! To The Movies - Jared Faber - Score CD due Aug. 10 on WaterTower


COMING SOON

August 3
Mission: Impossible 1988 - Lalo Schifrin, Ron Jones - La-La Land
Skyscraper - Steve Jablonsky - Milan
August 10
Desperado Outpost/Westward Desperado
 - Masaru Sato - Cinema-Kan (import)
Into the Badlands: Season 2 - Trevor Yulie - Varese Sarabande
James Horner: The Classics - James Horner - Sony
Teen Titans Go! To the Movies - Jared Faber - WaterTower
August 17
Mission: Impossible - Fallout - Lorne Balfe - La-La Land
Slender Man - Ramin Djawadi - Sony
August 24
The Darkest Minds - Benjamin Wallfisch - Milan
Hurricane
- Nino Rota - Varese Sarabande
Legion: Season 2 - Jeff Russo - Lakeshore
Westworld: Season 2 - Ramin Djawadi - WaterTower
August 31
Kin - Mogwai - Rock Action (import)
Date Unknown
Advise and Consent 
- Jerry Fielding - Kritzerland
Not Afraid, Not Afraid
- Gabriel Yared - Caldera
The Prisoner of Zenda - Henry Mancini - La-La Land


THIS WEEK IN FILM MUSIC HISTORY

July 27 - Marc Wilkinson born (1929)
July 27 - Bernard Herrmann records the Piano Concerto for the Hangover Square score (1944)
July 27 - Michael Linn born (1952)
July 27 - Stefan Nilsson born (1955)
July 27 - Alex North begins recording his score to The Outrage (1964)
July 27 - Max Steiner begins recording his score for Those Calloways (1964)
July 27 - Harry Lubin died (1977)
July 27 - Georges Delerue records his score for Exposed (1982)
July 27 - Jerome Moross died (1983)
July 27 - Miklos Rozsa died (1995)
July 28 - Carmen Dragon born (1914)
July 28 - Ray Ellis born (1923)
July 28 - Brian May born (1934)
July 28 - Recording sessions begin for Frederick Hollander’s score for Disputed Passage (1939)
July 28 - Richard Hartley born (1944)
July 28 - On the Waterfront opens in New York (1954)
July 28 - Richard Shores records his score for The Wild Wild West episode “The Night of the Firebrand” (1967)
July 28 - Robert Drasnin records his score for the Mission: Impossible episode “Butterfly” (1970)
July 28 - Leonard Rosenman begins recording his adaptation score for Bound for Glory (1976)
July 28 - Basil Poledouris records his score for The House of God (1980)
July 28 - Laurence Rosenthal records his score for Proud Men (1987)
July 29 - Mikis Theodorakis born (1925)
July 29 - Gian Piero Reverberi born (1939)
July 29 - Michael Holm born (1943)
July 29 - Bronislau Kaper begins recording his score for Quentin Durward (1955)
July 29 - Lalo Schifrin begins recording his score for The Venetian Affair (1967)
July 29 - Lee Holdridge records his score for The Explorers: a Century of Discovery (1988)
July 29 - Doug Timm died (1989)
July 29 - Giorgio Gaslini died (2014)
July 30 - Guenther Kauer born (1921)
July 30 - Antoine Duhamel born (1925)
July 30 - David Sanborn born (1945)
July 30 - Alexina Louie born (1949)
July 30 - Recording sessions begin for Frederick Hollander’s score for Remember the Night (1949)
July 30 - Peter Knight died (1985)
July 30 - Richard Band begins recording his score for Zone Troopers (1985)
July 31 - Barry De Vorzon born (1934)
July 31 - Michael Wolff born (1952)
July 31 - Lionel Newman begins recording his score for The Last Wagon (1956)
July 31 - John 5 born as John Lowery (1971)
July 31 - Richard Band records his score for The Alchemist (1981)
July 31 - Lennie Niehaus records his score for the Amazing Stories episode “Vanessa in the Garden” (1985)
August 1 - Walter Scharf born (1910)
August 1 - Jerome Moross born (1913)
August 1 - Lionel Bart born (1930)
August 1 - Paddy Moloney born (1938)
August 1 - Michael Penn born (1958)
August 1 - Dean Wareham born (1963)
August 1 - Antony Partos born (1968)
August 1 - Dhani Harrison born (1978)
August 1 - Paul Sawtell died (1971)
August 1 - Arthur B. Rubinstein records his score for the Amazing Stories episode "Remote Control Man" (1985)
August 2 - Carlo Savina born (1919)
August 2 - Joe Harnell born (1924)
August 2 - Phillip Lambro born (1935)
August 2 - Arthur Kempel born (1945)
August 2 - Dimitri Tiomkin begins recording his score for Gunfight at the OK Corral (1956)
August 2 - Recording sessions begin on Leigh Harline’s score for No Down Payment (1957)
August 2 - Robert Drasnin records his score for The Wild Wild West episode “The Night of the Man-Eating House” (1966)
August 2 - Lalo Schifrin records his score for the Mission: Impossible episode “The Miracle” (1971)
August 2 - Muir Mathieson died (1975)
August 2 - Irwin Bazelon died (1995)

DID THEY MENTION THE MUSIC?

BUSTER'S MAL HEART - Mister Squinter
 
"A burbling electro score by Mister Squinter subtly amplifies the characters' impending-apocalypse talk, but Smith doesn't lean too hard in the direction of sci-fi, preferring instead to suggest that a single man's mind contains more than enough worlds to explore."
 
John DeFore, Hollywood Reporter

MIKE AND DAVE NEED WEDDING DATES - Jeff Cardoni
 
"Anyway, if you’ve seen the trailers, you’ve seen what happens next, and most of the jokes. Once they’re on the island, Alice and Tatiana show their true, drunken colors, wreaking far more havoc than their dudebro dates. There’s a bit involving an ATV excursion gone awry that’s excruciatingly lengthy, considering every ad has revealed the punch line (and the whole bit is lifted from 'Meet the Parents' anyway). Kumail Nanjiani is brought in for a sequence so sad, you want him to show the camera his big paycheck when it’s over. Sam Richardson, who has emerged as the comic MVP of 'Veep,' is given precisely no jokes -- though there aren’t many laughs in general, and that’s before they start with the emotional romantic stuff and big deception reveals, complete with this-is-sad-and-touching score. The only thing sadder than an unfunny comedy is an unfunny comedy reaching for phony, clumsy pathos. Apatow movies are harder than they look, huh?"
 
Jason Bailey, Flavorwire

"Composer Jeff Cardoni oversells every remotely emotional moment with a syrupy score, which becomes grating as Dave and Alice start to lower their guard around each other and share their hopes and fears. 'Mike And Dave' wants to have it both ways, being both appalling and touching, but the filmmakers don’t demonstrate an ability to do either well."
 
Tim Grierson, Screen Illustrated
 
SLEIGHT - Charles Scott IV

"Still, 'Sleight' manages to engage despite a fairly simple narrative. It never collapses under the weight of its many genre appendages, assisted by crisp, night-light-streaked cinematography from Edward Wu and a pulsing and propulsive electro guitar score by Charles Scott IV that wouldn’t sound of out place on an early M83 album."
 
Rodrigo Perez, IndieWire

"Dillard’s script is impressive not only for the way it hybridizes various genre ancestors, but for its efficiency. Rarely do characters spout exposition about their situations or feelings; instead, the filmmaker conveys much about Bo’s emotions, and the dynamics he shares with others, through canny aesthetic choices. His striking compositions impart information through framing and spatial arrangements, and Ed Wu’s sinewy camerawork and rich color palette do much to create a heightened sense of suspense -- as does Charles Scott IV’s brooding electronic score. No matter its low budget, which is also the reason for its thrifty use of special effects, 'Sleight,' progressing with a dreamy rhythm infused with danger, is never less than formally arresting."
 
Nick Schager, The Daily Beast
 
"Slight is right. Arguably the biggest letdown of the 2016 Sundance film festival, J.D. Dillard’s feature debut squanders its high concept -- an amateur street magician uses his craft to free himself from the clutches of a maniacal drug dealer -- and serves up a low-rent, Nickelodeon-lite version of that story, blowing his chance with corny acting, paint-by-numbers plotting, and a dippy score."
 
Peter Debruge, Variety

THE NEXT TEN DAYS IN L.A.

Screenings of older films, at the following L.A. movie theaters: AMPASAmerican Cinematheque: AeroAmerican Cinematheque: EgyptianArclightLACMALaemmleNew BeverlyNuart and UCLA.

July 27
THE BABADOOK (Jed Kurzel) [Nuart]
COUNSELLOR AT LAW [UCLA]
THE MALTESE FALCON (Adolph Deutsch), THE BIG SLEEP (Max Steiner) [Cinematheque: Aero]
THE RED KIMONA [Cinematheque: Egyptian]

July 28
ALL THAT JAZZ (Ralph Burns) [UCLA]
TO HAVE AND HAVE NOT (Franz Waxman), DARK PASSAGE (Franz Waxman) [Cinematheque: Aero]
WHERE ARE MY CHILDREN? [Cinematheque: Egyptian]

July 29
THE AFRICAN QUEEN (Allan Gray), BEAT THE DEVIL (Franco Mannino) [Cinematheque: Aero]
THE COLOR OF POMEGRANATES (Tigran Mansuryan) [LACMA]
KIRIKOU AND THE SORCERESS (Youssou N'Dour) [UCLA]
THE OYSTER PRINCESS, FORBIDDEN PARADISE [UCLA]

July 31
ANASTASIA (David Newman, Stephen Flaherty) [LACMA]

August 2
AMITYVILLE 3D (Howard Blake) [Cinematheque: Egyptian]
GOLDFINGER (John Barry) [Laemmle NoHo]
ROMEO AND JULIET (Nino Rota) [Cinematheque: Aero]

August 3
AIRPLANE! (Elmer Bernstein) [Cinematheque: Aero]
DIE, MOMMIE, DIE! (Dennis McCarthy) [UCLA]
FRIDAY THE 13TH PART 3 (Harry Manfredini), FRANKENSTEIN'S BLOODY TERROR (Angel Arteaga) [Cinematheque: Egyptian]
GREASE 2 (Louis St. Louis, Michael Gibson) [Nuart]

August 4
AUNTIE MAME (Bronislau Kaper) [Laemmle Ahrya Fine Arts]
STARCHASER: THE LEGEND OF ORIN (Andrew Belling) [Cinematheque: Egyptian]
TROUBLE IN PARADISE, ANGEL [UCLA]
WANDA (Dave Mullaney) [Cinemathque: Aero]

August 5
THE BIG LEBOWSKI (Carter Burwell) [Laemmle Ahrya Fine Arts]
SPACEHUNTER: ADVENTURES IN THE FORBIDDEN ZONE (Elmer Bernstein) [Cinematheque: Egyptian]
WHO'S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF? (Alex North) [Cinematheque: Aero]


THINGS I'VE HEARD, READ, SEEN OR WATCHED LATELY

I know it's never really fair to compare the great films of the past to the current crop of movies -- it's hard to really know what will stand the test of time -- but one older film I saw again this year simply blew me away. I recently saw Brian De Palma's Carrie on the big screen for the first time in years, and it was even better than I'd remembered -- it gets my vote for the best horror film of all time. Much as I've always loved the craftsmanship of the film -- Donaggio's score, Mario Tosi's cinematography, Paul Hirsch's remarkable editing -- one thing that struck me this time is how absolutely perfect the plotting is, like a classical tragedy.

It inspired me to re-read Stephen King's original novel, which I'd read twice before but not for many years. I used to read King's novels religiously -- from The Dead Zone on, I would buy most of them in hardback when they were first published -- but over the years I found myself with much less time for pleasure reading (a day job will do that), and even less patience for King's rambling, editor-free approach (the fact that King, despite his enormous gifts as a novelist, is a truly terrible writer of screenplays and teleplays has colored my opinion of him in general). Overall, I tend to prefer King books with simple, strong premises, like Salem's Lot, The Dead Zone, or Misery, while an epic horror novel like It leaves me cold -- with such an all-powerful supernatural enemy, everything starts to seem a bit random (and don't get me started on King's reaction to criticisms of the group-sex scene from the book It -- not King's finest hour).

Reading Carrie again, I was pleased to discover that nearly everything I loved so much in the film's script came from King's novel. In the pre-prom section, nearly every scene in the film comes more or less from the book and the few additions were first rate. The script by Lawrence D. Cohen (definitely not to be confused with Larry Cohen) gives Mrs. White (the magnificent Piper Laurie) a terrific intro scene, pestering Sue's mother (Priscilla Pointer, Amy Irving's real-life mother) at her home. It does an expert job of helping set up some of the reasons for Carrie's isolation from the community, and is full of wonderful details like the way Pointer addresses Laurie as "Mrs. White" instead of as "Margaret," or the look on Laurie's face when Pointer essentially offers her money to go away.

In King's novel, Carrie agrees to go to the prom with Tommy right away, but in the film she turns him down at first, and the script adds another terrific scene, of Carrie going to the gym teacher (Betty Buckley) for advice, and the teacher giving her some grooming tips, a touching scene which makes the teacher's death during the prom even more shocking and tragic (in the book, the teacher is actually injured early in Carrie's rampage and taken to safety before the gym is burned down)

Great as Laurie is in the film (and the casting is excellent throughout), the film couldn't work without the truly extraordinary performance of Sissy Spacek. Possibly the greatest performance in the history of horror cinema, she would have made even a lesser adaptation of this book a classic. The moment during the finale, where Spacek pleads with Laurie "Just hold me, momma," is especially devastating. (It may have been done for budgetary reasons, but the scaling down of the finale from King's novel -- in which Carrie destroys nearly the entire town -- was the right choice. Having her drag her mother's corpse into the closet and pull the house down around them makes more emotional sense).

And I'd of course be remiss in not highlighting Pino Donaggio's wonderful score. Much as it would be great to imagine what Herrmann would have written for it if he'd lived (though a Herrmann Seven-Per-Cent Solution is the truly tantalizing unwritten score for me), Donaggio did an expert job. The melodies may not be quite as gorgeous overall as Don't Look Now, and the score isn't as slick as Dressed to Kill, but in one of his earliest efforts he managed to find the true musical heart of the film.

Another favorite piece of mid-70s horror for me is the TV series Kolchak: The Night Stalker, and I've been very slowly making my way through the complete run (on DVD) of the 2005 reboot Night Stalker, starring Stuart Townsend and Gabrielle Union. For fans of the original Kolchak, I definitely do not recommend this reincarnation. It's not the worst thing ever -- it's just not especially good, or remotely necessary.

Novelist/screenwriter Richard Price once told a story about how when he was writing Sea of Love, the studio kept wanting to make it more like Fatal Attraction, the latest blockbuster smash in the erotic thriller genre. After Sea of Love was released and became a deserved box-office hit, Price ran into Fatal Attraction screenwriter James Dearden, who was writing and directing a remake of Ira Levin's A Kiss Before Dying. Dearden told Price that the studio was pressuring him to make his movie more like Sea of Love.

Chris Carter has acknowledged the original Kolchak: The Night Stalker as a key inspiration for The X-Files, even casting the original Kolchak himself, Darren McGavin, as the FBI agent who originated the X-Files. Since the original X-Files is basically Kolchak done "X-Files-style," it seemed really pointless for the Kolchak re-boot to follow the X-Files template so closely -- both in storytelling and tonal approach -- losing the original show's sense of humor (and the wonderful interplay of McGavin and Simon Oakland) and its imaginative monster-of-the-week structure, instead subsituting a lot of tiresome brooding and a really uninteresting backstory/conspiracy plot, involving murdered women, mysterious scars, and zombie bikers (don't ask). Stuart Townsend is certainly handsome and he broods well, but he bears no relation to the McGavin character that made the original series such a joy even in its weakest episodes. The best thing about the reboot is Gabrielle Union, the only one of the regulars you can truly care about.

That said, there are a handful of decent episodes, and the one I just watched, "Timeless," (the penultimate episode, unaired in its original run) managed to combine elements of The Night Strangler and the original Kolchak episode "The Youth Killer" in a fairly effective story, helped by fine guest performances by Mira Furlan and Kevin Rahm, who gave the story much more emotional weight than it really deserved.

Imperfect and unven as the original Kolchak was, it holds up a lot better than another show from its time I've been rewatching, Space: 1999. I love Barry Gray's theme, the production values, and the impressive roster of guest stars, including Brian Blessed, Peter Cushing, Joan Collins, Roy Dotrice, Julian Glover, Christopher Lee, Margaret Leighton, Leo McKern, Ian McShane and Billie Whitelaw. But apart from the occasional well-plotted episode, like "Voyager's Return," it's a silly and often maddeningly dull show.

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Comments (9):Log in or register to post your own comments
I'd suggest rewatching (and re-reading) ROSEMARY'S BABY -- a perfectly plotted story brilliantly realized in an (unusually faithful) film adaptation. As close to perfect as horror stories get, though possibly too "deliberately paced" for millennials.

I'd suggest rewatching (and re-reading) ROSEMARY'S BABY -- a perfectly plotted story brilliantly realized in an (unusually faithful) film adaptation. As close to perfect as horror stories get, though possibly too "deliberately paced" for millennials.

I agree that Rosemary's Baby is excellent. Ira Levin was a master plotter, and Mia Farrow's work is up there among the great performances, horror or otherwise. (And whatever one may think of him as a human being, Polanski is and was a master director). I just find that Carrie has an emotional level that really transcends the genre.

And may I add -- thank you for reading to the end of the column!

Carrie packed an emotional wallop for me even watching it for the first time back in high school--I always saw it much more as an intimate tragedy and Spacek's performance makes you feel so much for the character--you desperately WANT a happy ending for her that you know the genre itself must deny her.

Years ago, a bunch of co-workers and I went to see Carrie at the Fairfax Theater. I'd seen the film before on TV, in an "edited for television" cut, when I was 11 or 12. The end scene when the Carrie's hand grabs Amy Irving scared the shift out of me.

It was a much better experience, of course, to see a good 35mm print at the Fairfax. The crowd loved it. Great movie (easily one of DePalma's top 2 or 3).

I saw many great revival and second run movies at the Fairfax. It was a sad day when that theater closed. Here's a cool picture of the marquee on display in the photo shop next door:

https://images1.laweekly.com/imager/u/original/6791900/photo_center_-_marvin_002.jpg

Years ago, a bunch of co-workers and I went to see Carrie at the Fairfax Theater. I'd seen the film before on TV, in an "edited for television" cut, when I was 11 or 12. The end scene when the Carrie's hand grabs Amy Irving scared the shift out of me.

It was a much better experience, of course, to see a good 35mm print at the Fairfax. The crowd loved it. Great movie (easily one of DePalma's top 2 or 3).

I saw many great revival and second run movies at the Fairfax. It was a sad day when that theater closed. Here's a cool picture of the marquee on display in the photo shop next door:

https://images1.laweekly.com/imager/u/original/6791900/photo_center_-_marvin_002.jpg


There was a period where the Fairfax (when it was a Laemmle) and Monica would have revival screenings as weekend morning matinees, so I got to see a lot of cool stuff in the theater, including The Professionals and The Wild Bunch. I eagerly await the New Beverly re-opening; I've been working on a colossal list of every movie I've ever seen (or at least that I can remember seeing), and it only makes me want to see more older films in the theater (on film).

Years ago, a bunch of co-workers and I went to see Carrie at the Fairfax Theater. I'd seen the film before on TV, in an "edited for television" cut, when I was 11 or 12. The end scene when the Carrie's hand grabs Amy Irving scared the shift out of me.

It was a much better experience, of course, to see a good 35mm print at the Fairfax. The crowd loved it. Great movie (easily one of DePalma's top 2 or 3).

I saw many great revival and second run movies at the Fairfax. It was a sad day when that theater closed. Here's a cool picture of the marquee on display in the photo shop next door:

https://images1.laweekly.com/imager/u/original/6791900/photo_center_-_marvin_002.jpg


There was a period where the Fairfax (when it was a Laemmle) and Monica would have revival screenings as weekend morning matinees, so I got to see a lot of cool stuff in the theater, including The Professionals and The Wild Bunch. I eagerly await the New Beverly re-opening; I've been working on a colossal list of every movie I've ever seen (or at least that I can remember seeing), and it only makes me want to see more older films in the theater (on film).


Yep. This may have been around the same time period. Looking forward to the New Beverly re-opening as well (even though I now live further away).

I'm a big enough nerd that I kept nearly all my tickets stubs from senior year of high school until now.

Carrie packed an emotional wallop for me even watching it for the first time back in high school--I always saw it much more as an intimate tragedy and Spacek's performance makes you feel so much for the character--you desperately WANT a happy ending for her that you know the genre itself must deny her.

Carrie is an achingly sad movie that's not really given its due because of the pulp horror elements, which are GREAT but obscure just how much of a brilliant, perceptive character study of a disaffected teen girl it is. It was John Hughes a decade early, and while everyone rightly remembers the bucket o' blood and Carrie White's subsequent, meanly cathartic revenge for a lifetime's worth of slights from her peers, it's that moment afterwards where she collapses into her mothers arms in tears, crying about how "You were right, Momma...they laughed at me..." that makes me well up with sympathy every time. De Palma has often been branded "misogynistic" for his treatment of women, but the fact that he directed Sissy Spacek and Piper Laurie to Oscar nominations for a HORROR movie speaks against this gratuitous, misinformed smear against his character. It's the rare horror movie that can make you cry as much as it can make you scream, and it's this empathy that makes that famous shock ending all the more effective...you're sitting there watching Amy Irving putting flowers on Carrie's grave (defaced with "BURN IN HELL" graffiti), thinking, with queasy guilt, about how dreadfully unfair her fate was, and when her bloody hand reaches out to grasp her arm, it's the fact that De Palma made you care for Carrie so much that totally deflects you from even expecting a shock (plus, the fact that the "shock ending" trope hadn't been beaten into the ground yet circa 1976).

The 2013 remake -- despite being generally well-acted -- stumbles because it has NONE of the haunting, bad-dream stylistic poetry of De Palma's film, playing out more like a rote superhero origin (replete with generic F/X). And Marco Beltrami's flat score is a poor substitute for Pino Donaggio's beautiful music for the original.

I'm a big enough nerd that I kept nearly all my tickets stubs from senior year of high school until now.

No shit. You too?

Scott, as someone who adored/misses your 'Worst Films of the Year'/'Favorite Scores' columns, I'm really digging these end of Film Score Friday musings of yours.

Carrie & RB are master works in horror the scripts are so dam good the casts stand out a mile from most competitors, always had a softer spot for Carrie the motherly bond was sheer craziness really off key the bullying pupils were so unjust you just wanted to weep an care for her on both ends, my best music parts Bucket of Blood, what a destructive scene Donaggio's prom pieces give you an unforgettable intensity, cue Retribution, School in Flames still gives me the jitters today when listening to it.

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Today in Film Score History:
August 21
Alex Wurman wins the Emmy for his Temple Grandin score; Sean Callery wins his third Emmy, for the 24 episode score “Day 8: 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.; Wendy Melvoin and Lisa Coleman win for Nurse Jackie’s main title theme (2010),
Angelo Francesco Lavagnino died (1987)
Basil Poledouris born (1945)
Constant Lambert died (1951)
Gerald Fried records his score for the Mission: Impossible episode “The Widow” (1967)
Joe Strummer born (1952)
Recording sessions begin for Hugo Friedhofer’s score for Two Flags West (1950)
Richard Band begins recording his score for Robo Warriors (1996)
Walter Schumann died (1958)
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