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Hawkins on Murder/Winter Kill/Babe (1973/1974/1975)
Music by Jerry Goldsmith
Hawkins on Murder/Winter Kill/Babe Hawkins on Murder/Winter Kill/Babe
Click to enlarge images.
Price: $19.95
Limited #: 3000
View CD Page at SAE Store
Line: Silver Age
CD Release: July 2003
Catalog #: Vol. 6, No. 13
# of Discs: 1

Jerry Goldsmith is one of the greatest feature film composers of all time, but he has often returned to his roots in television for memorable themes and scores, from The Man From U.N.C.L.E. to Star Trek Voyager. The early 1970s were an especially prolific time for Goldsmith in television, and this CD features three of his projects for M-G-M Television, two of them produced by U.N.C.L.E.'s Norman Felton.

Hawkins on Murder (1973) was the 90-minute pilot film for a short-lived series starring Jimmy Stewart as Billy Jim Hawkins, a canny West Virginia defense attorney. Goldsmith wrote an energetic theme featuring twangy Minimoog synthesizer, emphasizing Hawkins' country roots and the authority of the law. The balance of the 17-minute score features sympathetic strains for an innocent heiress played by Bonnie Bedelia, with acoustic guitar performances by Laurindo Almeida.

Winter Kill (1974) was a two-hour intended pilot movie starring Andy Griffith as a small-town sheriff confronted with a vicious string of murders. Goldsmith wrote an exciting theme for ARP synthesizer, strumming guitars and orchestra, foreshadowing his popular score to Breakheart Pass (1976), along with moody, ambient suspense and action cues including low-end piano and tabla percussion. (Certain atmospheric cues are relegated to the bonus section of the CD.)

Babe (1975) was a stellar TV movie about Babe Didrikson Zaharias, the greatest woman athlete of the 20th century. The production was one of the first biopics for television and one of the finest, with Emmy-winning efforts by actress Susan Clark and Goldsmith. The score is a sensitive gem of melody and Americana, with a heartfelt main theme often played by acoustic guitar, and lively accompaniment for Babe's athletic achievements.

This CD features Goldsmith's complete scores to Hawkins on Murder, Winter Kill and Babe, remixed and mastered from the original 1/2" stereo tapes. Liner notes are by TV music authority Jon Burlingame.

Jerry Goldsmith Scores on FSM
About the Composer

What to say about Jerry Goldsmith (1929-2004), the reason so many of us are soundtrack collectors in the first place? The Los Angeles native knew early on he wanted to write music for the movies, had an extensive training in television in the 1950s (starting at CBS), and went on to an unparalleled career in the movies—capable of brilliance in every genre, and beloved by his peers and fans. FSM has released as many of his scores as we could get our hands on, from classic TV work like The Man From U.N.C.L.E. to famous features (Patton) and obscure gems like The Illustrated Man and 100 Rifles...heck, make that all of them. Jerry, we love you and miss you! IMDB

Comments (52):Log in or register to post your own comments
Hawkins On Murder/Winter Kill/Babe-- This is my favorite FSM CD release!

The scores represents everything that Jerry had on the ball back in the early Seventies: the sensitive acoustic guitar (shades of Take a Hard Ride), synth sounds (Logan's Run) and string writing reminiscent of Papillon. Jerry's telling quote about TV music of the time really drove home how much TV music has lost in the ensuing years, but thankfully we have this release containing some of Goldsmith's best TV music. I'm especially enjoying Winter Kill, a film I'd love to see. There's a lot to like about this score: Suspenseful and atmospheric suspense cues, The Main Title is similar to Take a Hard Ride and the menacing piano in "Late Arrival/What's in a Name/I'm Worried/A New Killer" reminds me of The Sand Pebbles cue "Coolies Jump Ship."

...and I love that ARP synthesizer!

I should play the whole of this CD again; the main titles are great, and Hawkins has some nice moments, but I much prefer the third you did not mention: Babe.
It's an utterly different score from the other two, very melodic, with an extremely beautiful, melancholy main theme.
Even a new listen does not make the first two scores more appealing to me (beyond intellectual appreciation), their main titles and Babe make it worth having this CD.

Hawkins On Murder/Winter Kill/Babe-- This is my favorite FSM CD release!

The scores represents everything that Jerry had on the ball back in the early Seventies: the sensitive acoustic guitar (shades of Take a Hard Ride), synth sounds (Logan's Run) and string writing reminiscent of Papillon. Jerry's telling quote about TV music of the time really drove home how much TV music has lost in the ensuing years, but thankfully we have this release containing some of Goldsmith's best TV music. I'm especially enjoying Winter Kill, a film I'd love to see. There's a lot to like about this score: Suspenseful and atmospheric suspense cues, The Main Title is similar to Take a Hard Ride and the menacing piano in "Late Arrival/What's in a Name/I'm Worried/A New Killer" reminds me of The Sand Pebbles cue "Coolies Jump Ship."

...and I love that ARP synthesizer!


I remember seeing WINTER KILLS on TV back in the 70's and being totally freaked out by it. Now I realize it was because of Jerry's tabla and synth writing during the murder sequences. Such a bizarre approach that you would never hear in a tv or feature film these days...the directors wouldn't allow it!

Wish this TV film was available on some format just to relive those chills...

...oh, and yes, BABE has one of Goldsmith's most beautifully sad melodies....right up there with his theme from THE OTHER around the same time.

Damn, I gotta bust this CD out.
Hawkins is funky.

Babe is a particularly lovely score, very reminiscent of Georges Delerue's work. All three scores make for a varied and fascinating dissection of Goldsmith's many talents, and the stereo sound is remarkable for mid-70's television.

The following thread contains more raves (from the dedicated few) who love this release. (my remarks from there are repeated here):

http://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=14960&forumID=1&archive=1

According to the FSM homepage, Jerry Goldsmith recorded his HAWKINS score on this very day in 1973.

http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/resources/calendar.cfm

I got this through the post the other day - I'd ordered it in the first week of the current sale. Just a few comments -

HAWKINS ON MURDER is hands-down great! Really spunky Main Theme (can I say that although I'm British?), and some of Goldsmith's most tender underscoring, from the time he was leaning on that kind of "Neo-Bach" (hope you know what I mean) stuff. Very plaintive, and extremely similar to the "Renaissance" (as Lukas K and Jeff B call it in the liner notes) material in the superb THE ILLUSTRATED MAN (which I coincidentally received in the same shipping).

WINTER KILL takes a bit of getting used to. There is such a polar extreme between the bright Main Titles, which sounds as if it could be for BANANA SPLITS, and the extremely dark, experimental noodlings of much of the rest of the score. Amazing to think that this was for a fairly run-of-the-mill (?) TV Movie. By the way, I wonder if Lukas and the gang deliberately decided to break from their usual "C and C" presentation here, putting some of the weirder tracks as "Bonus Material", knowing that it would have been too much as a chronological listening experience... I think Thor sold it anyway!

BABE is very nice. On first listen I thought it was very "samey", but it's one of those things which shows its nuances on repeated listens. It's perhaps the first indication of "Goldsmith-Lite" in his career, about 20 years before he really started going that way - much of it puts me in mind of the very tranquil first track of BAD GIRLS ("The John").

Anyway, I'm giving this a thumbs up, and if you want it now, you're gonna have to pay 20 dollars. Think about it before you spend the money on beer!

I'm sorry, but I don't share your enthusiasm for this, Graham. However, it was not so much the presentation, but in this case the actual music itself that turned me off. Here's what I wrote in the previously listed thread back in 2006:

"When the FSM print issue ran out a year ago or so, I got to pick two CD's as compensation. I took a chance on this because I liked the sound clips of all the MAIN THEMES. However, when the CD arrived, I was VERY disappointed. The rest of the score was meandering, directionless plunking. I love experimental/dissonant/textural music in general, but this just left me completely cold and was in fact a bit annoying at times. I think I'll trade it away if I ever get the chance."

And sell it I did.

I got this through the post the other day - I'd ordered it in the first week of the current sale. Just a few comments -

HAWKINS ON MURDER is hands-down great! Really spunky Main Theme (can I say that although I'm British?), and some of Goldsmith's most tender underscoring, from the time he was leaning on that kind of "Neo-Bach" (hope you know what I mean) stuff. Very plaintive, and extremely similar to the "Renaissance" (as Lukas K and Jeff B call it in the liner notes) material in the superb THE ILLUSTRATED MAN (which I coincidentally received in the same shipping).

WINTER KILL takes a bit of getting used to. There is such a polar extreme between the bright Main Titles, which sounds as if it could be for BANANA SPLITS, and the extremely dark, experimental noodlings of much of the rest of the score. Amazing to think that this was for a fairly run-of-the-mill (?) TV Movie. By the way, I wonder if Lukas and the gang deliberately decided to break from their usual "C and C" presentation here, putting some of the weirder tracks as "Bonus Material", knowing that it would have been too much as a chronological listening experience... I think Thor sold it anyway!

BABE is very nice. On first listen I thought it was very "samey", but it's one of those things which shows its nuances on repeated listens. It's perhaps the first indication of "Goldsmith-Lite" in his career, about 20 years before he really started going that way - much of it puts me in mind of the very tranquil first track of BAD GIRLS ("The John").

Anyway, I'm giving this a thumbs up, and if you want it now, you're gonna have to pay 20 dollars. Think about it before you spend the money on beer![/endquote]

I agree, Graham, I'm glad you like it. It's a super FSM release!

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Track List
Instruments/Musicians
Click on each musician name for more credits
For more specific musician lists for the scores on this album, go here:
Babe (TV Movie)
Hawkins on Murder: Death and the Maiden (Pilot)
Winter Kill (TV Movie)

Leader (Conductor):
Jerry (Jerrald) Goldsmith

Violin:
Arnold Belnick, Harry Bluestone, Glenn Dicterow, Bonnie J. Douglas (Shure), James Getzoff, Debbie Sue Grossman, Jacob Krachmalnick, Joy Lyle (Sharp), Irma W. Neumann, Stanley Plummer, Nathan Ross, Sheldon Sanov, Ralph Schaeffer, Haim Shtrum, Paul C. Shure, Marshall Sosson, Robert "Bob" Sushel, Dorothy M. Wade (Sushel), Tibor Zelig

Viola:
Myer Bello, Samuel Boghossian, Phillip Goldberg, Pamela Goldsmith, Jan Hlinka, Myra Kestenbaum, Louis Kievman, Alex Neiman, Robert Ostrowsky, Sven Reher, Barbara A. Simons (Transue), Milton Thomas

Cello:
Selene Depuy-Hurford, Joseph DiTullio, Justin DiTullio, Marie Fera, Armand Kaproff, Jerome Kessler, Jacqueline Lustgarten, Kurt Reher, Nino Rosso, Eleanor Slatkin, Mary Louise Zeyen

Bass:
Arni Egilsson, Milton Kestenbaum, Peter A. Mercurio, Ray Siegel

Flute:
Louise M. DiTullio (Dissman), Sheridon W. Stokes

Oboe:
John F. Ellis

Clarinet:
Dominick Fera, John Neufeld

Bassoon:
Norman H. Herzberg

Woodwinds:
Ronald Langinger (aka Ronny Lang), Ted Nash, C. E. "Bud" Shank

French Horn:
David A. Duke, Sinclair Lott, Arthur Maebe, Jr., George F. Price

Trumpet:
Uan Rasey, Manny Stevens, George Werth, Graham Young

Trombone:
Edward Kusby, Richard "Dick" Nash, Richard Noel, Phillip A. Teele

Tuba:
Ray Siegel

Piano:
Artie Kane, Pearl Kaufman (Goldman), Lincoln Mayorga

Guitar:
Laurindo Almeida, Alton R. "Al" Hendrickson, Orville Rhodes, Thomas "Tommy" Tedesco

Harp:
Dorothy S. Remsen

Drums:
Larry Bunker, Kenneth E. Watson

Percussion:
Larry Bunker, Milton Holland, Joe Porcaro, Kenneth E. Watson, Jerry D. Williams

Orchestrator:
Alexander Courage, Jerry (Jerrald) Goldsmith, Arthur Morton

Orchestra Manager:
Harry W. Lojewski

Supervising Copyist:
Harry W. Lojewski

Copyist:
Gene Bren, Jack Dulong, Willard W. Jones, Ray Mace, Dale R. McMickle, Donald J. Midgley, David Rhodes, Fred Sternberg, Harry Taylor

© 2014 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved.