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 Posted:   Nov 5, 2013 - 4:35 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)



On February 15, 2013 GSPO will celebrate ten years at the Warner Grand Theatre with a tribute to one of the most influential film composers, Elmer Bernstein. Join Maestro Fox, Peter Bernstein, Elmer’s son, and other industry professionals and composers as they present multiple World Premieres and iconic favorites such as Magnificent Seven, Far From Heaven, Ten Commandments, Three Amigos and To Kill a Mockingbird. Peter has confirmed that he will conduct a World Premiere while also working with Victor Pesavento, GSPO Music Director, to create a new suite of Elmer’s iconic comedic scores


February 15, 2013 • 8:00 pm

Great Composer Tribute:
Elmer Bernstein

Golden State Pops Orchestra,
conducted by Maestro Steven Allen Fox


Tickets on sale now

SPECIAL GUESTS:
Peter Bernstein
John Landis
Bear McCreary
Richard Kraft
Patrick Russ

INCLUDING MUSIC FROM:

THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN
THE TEN COMMANDMENTS
TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD
WALK ON THE WILD SIDE
HOLLYWOOD AND THE STARS
FAR FROM HEAVEN
FROM THE TERRACE

SUITE INCLUDING:

AIRPLANE
3 AMIGOS
GHOSTBUSTERS
STRIPES
SPIES LIKE US
TRADING PLACES
ANIMAL HOUSE



http://www.gspo.com/

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 6, 2013 - 9:21 AM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

I wonder if the GSPO could get together with Richard Kraft who has sheet music from all these songs and create a medley?
Some of these, like BABY THE RAIN MUST FALL and WALK ON THE WILD SIDE got pretty high on the charts:

BABY THE RAIN MUST FALL lyrics by Ernie Shelton
BIRD MAN OF ALCATRAZ (The Bird Man) lyrics by Mack David
THE BUCCANEER (Lover’s Gold- Love Theme From) lyrics by Mack David
THE CARPETBAGGERS (Monica-Love Theme from) lyrics by Earl Shuman
CAST A GIANT SHADOW (Love Me True- Love Theme From) lyrics by Ernie Shelton
DOCTORS’ WIVES (The Costume Ball) lyrics by Marilyn and Alan Bergman
FROM NOON TIL THREE (Hello and Goodbye) lyrics by Marilyn and Alan Bergman
A GIRL NAMED TAMIKO lyrics by Mack David
THE GREAT ESCAPE (March) lyrics by Al Stillman
HALLELUJAH TRAIL lyrics by Ernie Shelton
HAWAII lyrics by Mack David
HAWAII (The Wishing Doll) lyrics by Mack David
HOW NOW DOW JONES lyrics Carolyn Leigh
HOW NOW DOW JONES (Step to the Rear) lyrics by Carolyn Leigh
HOW NOW DOW JONES (Where You Are) lyrics by Carolyn Leigh
HUD lyrics by Mack David
I LOVE YOU ALICE B. TOKLAS lyrics by Paul Mazursky, and Larry Tucker
KINGS GO FORTH (Monique- Song From) lyrics by Sammy Cahn
LOVE WITH A PROPER STRANGER lyrics by Johnny Mercer
THE MAN WITH THE GOLDEN ARM lyrics by Sammy Cahn
MAN WITH THE GOLDEN ARM (Deliah Jones- Main Title Theme) lyrics by Silvia Fine
MEATBALLS (Good Friends) lyrics by Norman Gimbal
MERLIN lyrics by Don Black
THE SILENCERS (Theme From) lyrics by Mack David
THE SILENCERS (Santiago) lyrics by Mack David
THE SONS OF KATIE ELDER lyrics by Ernie Shelton
THE TIN STAR lyrics by Jack Brooks
TRUE GRIT lyrics by Don Black
A WALK IN THE SPRING RAIN lyrics by Don Black
WALK ON THE WILD SIDE lyrics by Mack David
WALK ON THE WILD SIDE (Somewhere in the Used to Be) lyrics by Mack David

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 5, 2013 - 9:55 AM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

Oh hell it IS Elmer!!! I heard someone is writing a Bernstein bio coming out soon! Have you noticed the flurry of releases of Elmer scores recently?
I am so excited I don't know what to do!

No, I do know what to do. I am extracting a post I made years ago entitled
"ELMER BERNSTEIN The greatest film composer ever!" and plopping it right down here:

I have been bouncing around going from the AVATAR thread where Horner is extolled as the greatest story teller the cinema has ever known to the Williams discussion board where "isn't he the greatest composer ever!" pops up regularly. On the Morricone messageboard it is easy to find "Ennio changed the face of film music and left all the others behind" and there is the semi-annual sojourn here declaring "I miss Jerry Goldsmith so much, he was the greatest!" I never indulged in this stuff because I always thought it demeaned the real qualities of these master composers. But recently I thought it must FEEL really great to say something like that. So I have picked the only one of my kings who doesn't get as much gushing as the others and let fly:



Elmer Bernstein is IT! No one else has been there when everything was happening. From his baby steps in filmscoring smack in the midst of it's golden age, whose eastern European influences he could emulate expertly, to his innovative modern approach in SUDDEN FEAR (1953) (with woodwind solos and an "intimate" approach which showed he had a foot in both worlds). He had already started out as a strong young contender when a number of events honed him into a master.

In 1952 he met Charles Eames, the groundbreaking designer whose work, with wife Ray, in industrial design, furniture design, art, graphic design, film and architecture is famous the world over. Eames had made a film about the concepts that made the computer possible and Elmer scored it and throughout the next 25 years and 30 short films (all during Elmer's hollywood career) they truly would go where no man had gone before. Film score geeks probably are just familiar with "Toccata for Toy Trains" but cinema students have seen "The Powers of Ten" a film that begins with a wide shot of the known universe and ends within the subatomic particles of a man's hand. Yeah, Elmer scored that one too.

Event two was the Mccarthy era and his "gray listing". He would learn a lot of life lessons AND music ones too. He couldn't work on anything above ground so he was stuck the likes of CAT WOMEN ON THE MOON and ROBOT MONSTER but they taught him how to make due with practically nothing! The people at Capitol records (where he recorded these in 1952) were impressed with the sound you could get when you used a Novachord, a Hammond B3 organ, some electrified instruments and an extremely small orchestra. They went wild for those early electronics. So did many over the years. In retrospect if someone were to ask me what score is the best marriage of electronics and conventional instruments I would pick Bernstein's THE CARETAKERS.

The third event was meeting David Wolper. After doing "Hollywood and the Stars" Elmer did a long series of award winning documentaries that changed the face of that artform including the National Geographic series that retains his "accidental" theme to this day.

Meanwhile back in Hollywood Elmer broke the blacklist with a one-two punch that no one ever forgot. One from controversy-magnet Otto Preminger hiring him to do THE MAN WITH THE GOLDEN ARM, the first jazz score in history. Alex North may have incorporated jazz influences into his score but Elmer's was the first to incorporate jazz riffs into his, which, let's face it, is the definition of what jazz is. He opened things way up for Mancini and a ton of others. In the mean time punch number two came when, while working on dances for THE TEN COMMANDMENTS it's composer Victor Young became ill and he inherited the whole score under the auspices of Cecil B. Demille, the man who created the blacklist (on the artists side of things)! Elmer could write old Hollywood with the best of them. There has got to be a dozen leitmotifs in THE TEN COMMANDMENTS, these days I am lucky if I can hear one. And in the exodus scene he learned how to score faster than what is ostensibly on screen. Add to that he did it all again in THE BUCCANEER which Demille did not have the health to direct himself. As a dubious honor Elmer used to joke he scored more major director's swansongs than anybody else. The last films of Demille, Fred Zinnemann, William Wyler, John Ford and Michael Curtiz were all done by him.

Elmer Bernstein, along with Jerome Moross, sashayed Coplandesque American writing into the western score with THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN, which Jerry Goldsmith called the “greatest western score ever written.” Indeed if you want to make the ultimate cliché film music concert you HAVE to include PSYCHO, JAWS, GONE WITH THE WIND, the James Bond theme, THE PINK PANTHER and THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN, all for instant identification. Having been stereotyped as king of the western score he used that power to explore many angles of the western including the starkness of Serge Bourguignon’s arty THE REWARD, the western jazz of THE SCALPHUNTERS, the spare modern western score for HUD, the gentle satire of FROM NOON TO THREE and the epic comedy THE HALLELUJAH TRAIL that has enough themes for a musical, in fact, it has 4 songs. Also mainstream Hollywood could finance this experimentation since John Wayne hired him to “give me another MAGNIFICENT SEVEN” for the next 16 years (and he came damn close in THE SONS OF KATIE ELDER).

In 1957 when BRIDGE ON THE RIVER KWAI had made a hit of the Colonel Bogey March there was a clamoring for an original hummable march. Way before William’s Indiana Jones march Elmer created THE GREAT ESCAPE. It set the tone for many a score and practically the rest of Ron Goodwin’s career. Robert Zemeckis’s and Bob Gale’s academy award winning student film A FIELD OF HONOR is totally built around that march. And, again, Elmer would only follow-up with very different approaches; British ZULU DAWN, Israeli CAST A GIANT SHADOW and an extraordinary meld of march and Vienna waltz BRIDGE AT REMAGEN.

More stereotypes followed but he used every one to explore different styles of music extending jazz to the classic SWEET SMELL OF SUCCESS and STACCATO TV series. And further To Cajun jazz in WALK ON THE WILD SIDE, to the African-calypso fusion of RAMPAGE, 70s funk of LIBERATION OF L.B.JONES, Ye Old English WHERE’S JACK, the gospel folk of GOD’S LITTLE ACRE, the Polynesian HAWAII, the Vegas SILENCERS, the pschedelia of I LOVE YOU, ALICE B. TOKLAS, Rock-a-billy BABY THE RAIN MUST FALL and on and on. And speaking of BABY, Glenn Yarbrough’s chart topping rendition of that song wasn’t the only popular song Elmer wrote. Brook Benton’s WALK ON THE WILD SIDE, Johnny Cash doing THE SONS OF KATIE ELDER, Jack Jone’s LOVE WITH THE PROPER STRANGER and even Vikki Carr on THE SILENCERS all got some airplay. Elmer did lots of theater including the 2 musicals MERLIN and the Tony winning HOW NOW DOW JONES. He wrote dance music for OKLAHOMA, THE TEN COMMANDMENTS and PETER PAN. And let us not forget his ultimate challenge. Ivan Reitman getting him to score the animated epic HEAVY METAL. Rock reviewers were assigned to review this film across the country and an amazing amount of them referred to Elmer’s score as the glue that melded the disparate heavy metal songs together into a coherent whole. I’ll go further and say this was Elmer’s STAR WARS and would have been recognized as so if the subject matter wasn’t so marginal for the time.

Now John Wayne wasn’t the only loyal employer Elmer had, Frank Sinatra, in films like SOME CAME RUNNING, CAST A GIANT SHADOW and KINGS GO FORTH remembered the talented GOLDEN ARM composer and when Sinatra did his only conducting album based on the poems of Norman Sickel, there is Elmer doing “Silver”. The fact is Elmer has one of the longer lists of Director-composer relationships ever. They include Cecil B. Demille, Anthony Mann, John Sturges, George Roy Hill, Robert Mulligan, Ivan Reitman, John Landis, Martha Coolidge, Tom Laughlin and Martin Scorsese. Frankly there are few directors of that era he didn’t work with. Vincente Minneli, Stanley Donen, Francis Ford Coppola, Stephen Frears, Peter Yates, Henry Hathaway, John Schlesinger, Martin Ritt, Sydney Pollack, Don Siegel, Jim Sheridan and John Frankenheimer all had a go with the maestro. At his peak he had so much work that he passed it on and recommended the likes of Jerry Goldsmith, John Williams, Lalo Schifrin, Fred Carlin and Marvin Hamlisch for jobs.

When I starting collecting him in 1965 he already had 20 soundtrack LPs out, more than any other composer. And that status remained with him for at least ten years more. He also had the most bootlegs made of his scores which led him to become the most outspoken activists against them. But he put his money where his mouth was. When fans asked “but then how do we get this music?” he created the Elmer Bernstein Film Music Collection, re-recordings of unreleased scores (available in The Bernstein Collection Box) and Filmmusic Notebook (available through the Film Music Society) to compliment them. Everything mostly out of his own pocket. Even though this experiment failed it led to a lifelong commitment to film music preservation as well as being president of the Society for the Preservation of Film Music from 1996 to 2001. BTW other positions he held include the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (first vice president, beginning in 1963; chair of the music branch with others), Screen Composers Association (director), Composers and Lyricists Guild of America (president, 1970--), National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences (founding life member and director) and Young Musicians Foundation (president 1961-71).

But all of this is secondary to the music. Every composer is judged by his highest achievements. Elmer has them in spades. His writing can be as dense as TWILIGHT or KINGS GO FORTH or he can achieve a simplicity, as in TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD that goes to the heart of what music is there for. And the effectiveness? How much does Elmer help Shirley Maclaine’s excruciatingly tragic performance at the end of SOME CAME RUNNING earn her an Oscar nomination? At what point did Burt Lancaster’s sensitive portrayal of THE BIRDMAN OF ALCATRAZ and the imagery of the chicks he nurtures merge with Bernstein’s oh-so-gentle proddings to reach poetic heights? How much of Tennessee William’s repressed sexuality in SUMMER AND SMOKE is expressed through Geraldine’s Page’s performance and how much through Elmer’s smoldering music? How much of MY LEFT FOOT's young Christy Brown's inarticulateness IS expressed through Bernstein's "figures turning in on themselves?" Is Sinatra in MAN WITH THE GOLDEN ARM trying to get through the DTs, or the “high” of Elmer’s music? Isn’t it Elmer’s music that gets Steve McQueen over that first fence in THE GREAT ESCAPE? Charleton Heston and the special effects go a long way but it is Bernstein’s music that convince us that we are witnessing the hand of God parting the waters in THE TEN COMMANDMENTS. And if you want to see the real power of film music just turn the sound off during the exodus in that same movie. Of the myriad titles Saul Bass created (including the Herrmann/Hitchcock ones), is there a more perfect marriage of music and image than the cat stroll in WALK ON THE WILD SIDE? But possibly the most telling is the minutiae of film scoring. The only music in HUD is accompanying rides over the lonely expanse, isolating these small town lives more than anything I could imagine. The few seconds of TRUE GRIT music that accompanies Rooster Cogburn one-handedly cocking his rifles before his final showdown in the meadow does more than any long overworked cue could. Elmer’s entire comedy career for me is encapsulated in the few seconds he vamps as Bluto comes up with the second half of his speech in ANIMAL HOUSE. He not only knows what is funny but knows how to make it funnier. This is the art of film scoring at it’s purest!

Now if you lay ALL of this out on the table you would be hard-pressed to find a career comparable, even among Golden Age composers! At the very least you have to admit there are no film composers that more deserve the designation “ARTIST”.Or you can go further, like me, and say Elmer Bernstein – the greatest film composer ever!

 
 Posted:   Dec 5, 2013 - 10:04 AM   
 By:   Lokutus   (Member)

Have you noticed the flurry of releases of Elmer scores recently?

What flurry are you exactly talking about? Except for Intrada's The Miracle and another pointless reissue from Kritzerland today, there has been hardly that many Bernstein's scores released over the past few months.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 5, 2013 - 10:23 AM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

Have you noticed the flurry of releases of Elmer scores recently?

What flurry are you exactly talking about? Except for Intrada's The Miracle and another pointless reissue from Kritzerland today, there has been hardly that many Bernstein's scores released over the past few months.


Well I think TRUE GRIT and CANADIAN BACON qualify. And with another you might call "pointless" ZULU DAWN re-issued plus us finally getting to hear his theme to ARTHUR OF THE BRITONS, I'd say (compared to what has come before) this definitely counts as a flurry.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 11, 2014 - 11:29 AM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 11, 2014 - 2:19 PM   
 By:   Eugene Iemola   (Member)

Thanks for the reminder- just got my pair. See you there.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 15, 2014 - 10:16 AM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

From Steven Allen Fox:

This concert is going to be another smash hit!




I am thrilled to announce that Peter Bernstein will be a special guest at the Golden State Pops Orchestra concert on February 15, 2014. Peter has worked on over 500 projects and began his professional career at 14 years old. Currently he is arranging a new Comedy Medley that he will conduct as a World Premiere at this concert. Here is what Peter had to say about this new work.

“For the the Golden State Pops concert “Great Composer Tribute: Music of Elmer Bernstein” I have created a new suite of music from his comedy scores of the 70's and 80's. This era begins with Animal House in 1978 and runs for about 10 years during which his career, which had previously been defined by sweeping Americana-oriented themes (The Magnificent Seven, To Kill a Mockingbird), or jazz-oriented scores (The Man With the Golden Arm, Walk on the Wild Side) was now associated with most successful youth-oriented comedies of the era.
“It was exciting for him to be in the forefront of a new kind of film-making, it was energizing to be working with an entirely new group of young producers and directors, and most of all it was a whole lot of fun. It was my privilege to be an orchestrator on most of these films and to enjoy this wonderful, unexpected time with him. Films represented in the suite include: Animal House, Ghostbusters, Trading Places, Stripes, Airplane!, 3 Amigos, and the music will include selections not usually, if ever, heard in concert.
“The suite could not have been created without the kind support of the Elmer Bernstein Estate.”
Peter Bernstein

We couldn’t be more excited to have Peter taking part in this concert. Make sure to buy your tickets now to get the best seat possible. Golden State Pops Orchestra with Maestro Steven Allen Fox presenting “Great Composer Tribute: Music of Elmer Bernstein” on February 15, 2014. Tickets range from $30 to $60 and are available at www.gspo.com.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 15, 2014 - 6:36 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

Okay, this is starting to heat-up for me. I noticed in part of their "other" facebook announcements some unusual titles are popping up:

HOLLYWOOD AND THE STARS A very lush and nostalgic piece of music which accompanied a TV series about the Golden Age of Hollywood. A favorite of mine.

WALK ON THE WILD SIDE Saul Bass, the guy who changed the face of title sequences and logos (which made way for James Bond and many other creative openings) got together with Elmer for what I think is the greatest marriages of music and image for one of these ever!


 
 
 Posted:   Jan 23, 2014 - 10:14 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

Bear McCreary has been added as a guest conductor.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 24, 2014 - 9:37 AM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

Nice artwork and Richard Kraft joins the night, no doubt with personal remembrances:

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 27, 2014 - 10:26 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

From facebook:


ANNOUNCEMENT! Composer Bear McCreary (The Walking Dead, Battlestar Galactica) will be joining the GSPO for our February 15 tribute to Elmer Bernstein, as a guest speaker and accordionist on To Kill A Mockingbird. Bear was one of Bernstein’s select protégés, and learned the tools of the trade working with and orchestrating for the maestro.

Bear is most known for his television work on shows "Battlestar Galactica," "The Walking Dead," "Da Vinci’s Demons," which won him his first Emmy Award, "Human Target," Marvel's "Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.," "Black Sails," and the upcoming series "Outlander."

Other notable projects Bear has worked on are "Europa Report," "Step Up 3D" and the video games "SOCOM4: U.S. Navy Seals," CAPCOM’s "Dark Void" and "Defiance." Lo9.com ranked McCreary one of the Ten Best Science Fiction Composers of All Time, and recently, WIRED Magazine declared him one of only five “Secret Weapons” of the television industry.

Bear guest conducted the GSPO in music from "Battlestar Galactica" in 2009 and we are thrilled to welcome him back to the stage again!

Don't delay in securing the best seats for this event, "Great Composer Tribute: Elmer Bernstein," at www.gspo.com

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 28, 2014 - 4:30 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

I just saw that there is a web discount if you put WEBgspo in the discount box when ordering.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 29, 2014 - 3:01 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

From Facebook:

Film Director JOHN LANDIS ("Three Amigos!," "Animal House," "Blues Brothers") will join the Golden State Pops on February 15 as a guest speaker at our concert honoring Elmer Bernstein.

Mr. Bernstein wrote the scores to multiple films by Mr. Landis, many with Peter Bernstein as orchestrator, who will also be a special guest at the concert.

John Landis is an American film director, screenwriter, actor and producer. He is known for his comedy films, horror films and his music videos with Michael Jackson. He is most known for "Three Amigos!," "Animal House," Michael Jackson's "Thriller," "Spies Like Us," "The Blues Brothers," "Trading Places" and "American Werewolf in London."
-----
"Great Composer Tribute: Elmer Bernstein"
Saturday, February 15, 2014 - 8:00 PM
Warner Grand Theatre at the L.A. Waterfront
Tickets at www.gspo.com

With special guests John Landis, Bear McCreary and Peter Bernstein

Including music from "Magnificent Seven," "Three Amigos!," "Walk on the Wild Side," "To Kill a Mockingbird," "From the Terrace," "Hollywood and the Stars," "Far From Heaven," "Ten Commandments" and more!

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 30, 2014 - 9:11 AM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

I have learned Bear McCreary will participate by performing on TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 31, 2014 - 10:05 AM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

The never performed SPIES LIKE US has been added to Peter Bernstein's comedy medley of
AIRPLANE
3 AMIGOS
GHOSTBUSTERS
STRIPES
TRADING PLACES
ANIMAL HOUSE

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 1, 2014 - 9:36 AM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

Another new title from his early years FROM THE TERRACE has been added. This film score, along with a couple others, inspired Todd Haynes to ask Elmer to recreate his romantic era scores in FAR FROM HEAVEN.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 4, 2014 - 10:53 AM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

From facebook:

Composer Bear McCreary...



...("The Walking Dead", "Black Sails", "Battlestar Galactica") will be joining the Golden State Pops Orchestra for our February 15 tribute to Elmer Bernstein, as a guest speaker and accordionist on To Kill A Mockingbird. Bear was one of Bernstein’s select protégés, and learned the tools of the trade working with and orchestrating for the maestro.

Bear is most known for his television work on shows "Battlestar Galactica," "The Walking Dead," "Da Vinci’s Demons," which earned him his first Emmy Award, "Human Target," Marvel's "Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.," "Black Sails," and the upcoming series "Outlander." Other notable projects Bear has worked on are "Europa Report," "Step Up 3D" and the video games "SOCOM4: U.S. Navy Seals," CAPCOM’s "Dark Void" and "Defiance." io9.com ranked McCreary one of the Ten Best Science Fiction Composers of All Time, and recently, WIRED Magazine declared him one of only five “Secret Weapons” of the television industry. Bear guest conducted the GSPO in music from "Battlestar Galactica" in 2009 and we are thrilled to welcome him back to the stage again!

Don't delay in securing the best seats for this event:


"Great Composer Tribute: Elmer Bernstein"
Saturday, February 15, 2014 - 8:00PM
Warner Grand Theatre at the LA Waterfront




Buy your tickets with a 20% discount with the code "WEBgspo".

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 4, 2014 - 11:05 AM   
 By:   Eugene Iemola   (Member)

I'd sure like to get a copy of that poster.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 4, 2014 - 5:25 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

I'd sure like to get a copy of that poster.

E-mail me.

 
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