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 Posted:   Nov 2, 2013 - 11:40 AM   
 By:   ToneRow   (Member)

Years ago, I had seen this Argo CD sit (for years) on the shelf within the classical music section of Tower Records, but I had never gotten it.



As of yet, I've never heard any of Dahl's concert works.

However, recently I noticed his name within the listings of soundtack liner notes as a performer (!) on piano on such scores as Franz Waxman's THE STORY OF RUTH and Jerry Goldsmith's SHOCK TREATMENT.

Has anybody noticed this before?

I wonder how many "serious" composers who also played instruments in Hollywood studio recording sessions?

Previously, I was only aware of percussionist William Kraft ... but apparently there's more than simply him! smile

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 2, 2013 - 11:43 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Hmmmm. He has a very Norwegian name, but I've never heard of him.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 2, 2013 - 11:49 AM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

Hmm, his Wiki entry is interesting. Sorry, I'd love to contribute more but I have to get to the supermaket before it closes.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 3, 2013 - 6:29 AM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

He's a new name to me too. I just spent the last 15 minutes listening to his "Aria Sinfonica" on YouTube (there's a lot of his stuff there), and really liked it. And if anyone's interested, do check out his biography on Wiki - the third paragraph will be of particular interest to many of us here - working on "The Twilight Zone", complaining about tinkling a few notes on SPARTACUS when nobody would ever hear it under the dialogue and sound effects and other musical instruments (!)

Anyway Tone, to answer your question... well, I can't answer it, because no composer springs to mind who was principally a writer of "serious" music, but also an occasional studio musician. Plenty of performers of course, but not any who were more noted as composers above all... and lots of names from the world of jazz, but that's not what you're looking for. There must be some though. My "senior moments" are more or less permanent nowadays.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 3, 2013 - 11:17 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Maybe John Williams. He continued his studio musician work into the 60s (and occasional gigs after that too) while also writing "serious" concert music.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 3, 2013 - 1:17 PM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

Yeah Thor, John Williams is about the closest I could get to what TR was asking. But I'm sure that what Mr Row would really like is something like this, which I found on an old newspaper cutting in a box of my late grandfather's favourite cigars...

" Béla Bartók has arrived in the States as a result of the escalating war in Europe. He intends to continue writing for the concert world, but has signed a contract with producer Hal Wallis as a studio musician, and will be at the piano on the soundtrack of a new adaptation of Kaufman and Hart's THE MAN WHO CAME TO DINNER, under the musical direction of Frederick Hollander. Bartók has said that he hopes this will be the start of a beautiful friendship." (Variety, November 1940)

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 3, 2013 - 1:55 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

The important question is -- what did you do with the cigars? Were they smokeable?

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 3, 2013 - 2:09 PM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

Dorothy Lamb Crawford devotes part of a chapter to Dahl in her interesting book, A Windfall of Musicians: Hitler's Emigres and Exiles in Southern California. Dahl is one of the many talented Europeans who never quite fit into the movie industry. A colleague and collaborator with Igor Stravinsky, he supported himself primarily by teaching at USC, where his students included Michael Tilson Thomas, Paul Glass, and many others. He did manage to complete a good number of compositions. I heard one of them played on a Copland House program last year, where Ms. Crawford was the guest speaker. A lively and pleasant piece, but I cannot remember much about it now.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 3, 2013 - 3:32 PM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

The important question is -- what did you do with the cigars? Were they smokeable?

Shmoked dem all and ma heid went all funny.

 
 Posted:   Nov 4, 2013 - 6:28 AM   
 By:   OnlyGoodMusic   (Member)

I bought that CD when it first came out. Interesting, strikingly original sometimes (especially orchestrations), a bit aloof emotionally (like Hindemith perhaps). Definitely interesting stuff.

 
 Posted:   Nov 4, 2013 - 3:53 PM   
 By:   ToneRow   (Member)

Maybe John Williams. He continued his studio musician work into the 60s (and occasional gigs after that too) while also writing "serious" concert music.

Oh yes, this is true.

But we all (or probably all) already know this.

John Williams is rather like music 101.

I'm much more fascinated by somebody such as Dahl who isn't chatted about, at least here @ FSM.
Yet, Dahl has performed on numerous film scores. Interesting uncovered territory. smile

How many times have some of us seen names like Artie Kane (piano) or Pearl Kaufman (harpsichord) within soundtrack liner notes.
It'd be fascinating to learn if someone such as Artie Kane composed a Sonata ... or if Pearl Kaufman wrote a concerto for harpsichord.

 
 Posted:   Nov 4, 2013 - 3:57 PM   
 By:   ToneRow   (Member)

Yeah Thor, John Williams is about the closest I could get to what TR was asking. But I'm sure that what Mr Row would really like is something like this, which I found on an old newspaper cutting in a box of my late grandfather's favourite cigars...

" Béla Bartók has arrived in the States as a result of the escalating war in Europe. He intends to continue writing for the concert world, but has signed a contract with producer Hal Wallis as a studio musician, and will be at the piano on the soundtrack of a new adaptation of Kaufman and Hart's THE MAN WHO CAME TO DINNER, under the musical direction of Frederick Hollander. Bartók has said that he hopes this will be the start of a beautiful friendship." (Variety, November 1940)


Yes, that's rather interesting to read, Graham.

 
 Posted:   Dec 3, 2013 - 3:33 PM   
 By:   ToneRow   (Member)

I've noticed this book on Dahl in a local library near me:



From what little of this book I looked through, there's only 2 pages which reference Ingolf Dahl's work as a studio musician.

The book mentions that Dahl was a keyboard man on North's THE SOUND AND THE FURY and SPARTACUS and CLEOPATRA (which the book claims was recorded in February and April of 1963).
Also, Dahl is quoted to have enjoyed working on a Goldsmith score at Fox in December of '63.
The book doesn't even mention the name of this score, but I'm quite certain that this could only have been SHOCK TREATMENT which was recorded in 2 days in Dec '63 (thanks to the Intrada album from earlier in 2013).

 
 Posted:   Dec 6, 2013 - 12:21 PM   
 By:   ToneRow   (Member)

(from FSM's online musician data in this site)

FSM CDs Featuring Ingolf Dahl

Instruments: Piano, Harpsichord, Novachord

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
The Green Berets
The Silver Chalice
Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea

 
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