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 Posted:   Sep 24, 2013 - 4:21 PM   
 By:   arthur grant   (Member)

Hello,
I am preparing an article for my website and would like to hear what readers think are their top film scores for what they contributed to the films they were composed for rather than for the more subjective listening experience on their own.

My main reason for asking is because I do not want to overlook anything (especially something I haven't seen) readers here might feel is important. If anyone participates I thank them in advance and feel free to make comments next to your selections.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 24, 2013 - 6:26 PM   
 By:   John B. Archibald   (Member)

Funny, I was just thinking about posting a thread similar to this.

My Favorite Top Ten Film Scores, in no particular order:
1. BEN-HUR
2. THE GHOST AND MRS. MUIR
3. LOST HORIZON (1937)
4. HAWAII
5. THE BIG COUNTRY
6. CLEOPATRA (1963)
7. THE ROBE
8. THE TIME MACHINE (1960)
9. THE OLD MILL (Animated Short-1937)
10.THE EGYPTIAN

Very difficult to avoid the subjective when making such a list. I notice most of these were first experienced during my early years, roughly from the ages of 10 to 20, which seems to be an impressionable period....

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 24, 2013 - 6:34 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

My top ten film scores:

The Best Years of Our Lives.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 24, 2013 - 7:12 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

Yes it can be hard to offer for many, a top ten list away from one own emotional feelings for the music itself.As we all know music is basically about emotions. But trying to play umpire as best as I can with the explanation, here are 10 films which I feel really was helped by the music score whether I like the music or the movie, here's mine----PSYCHO- 60- BERNARD HERRMANN-It made the film the classic it became, I once watch this film with the sound off, WHAT A DIFFERENCE-VERTIGO-54- BERNARD HERRMANN-Same story here, BERNARD was as much as the mood for this film as any other part of it.---------THE BLUE LAGOON-80- BASIL POLEDOURIS-Just think about this, the whole story is as trite as can be, the acting ,let's forget about it, How BASIL could turn a film into a great musical experience is a great job indeed. very few films had such extreme talents in it. ONE OF THE GREAT SCORES IN ONE OF THE WORST FILMS EVER THAT IS NOT SO BAD AFTER THE MUSIC ENTERS THE SCENE.Will list more shortly but my 15 minutes on this board is coming up.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 24, 2013 - 7:25 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

CARNIVAL OF SOULS-62- In the history of low budget horror, this was one of the best and GENE MOORE'S ALL ORGAN SCORE, just cemented this film to become a timeless horror classic.-----LEGEND OF THE FALLS-94- Far from the best film ever made. But a good one, however what JAMES HORNER gave to this film is pure magic.This is just so hard to breakdown, I mean ENNIO MORRICONE is one of the greats but nearly all the films he scored were moderate or maybe just good not great, but I will say what he contribute to THE GOOD THE BAD AND THE UGLY-68- was so immense in style and structure for a musical score I will throw this one in.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 24, 2013 - 7:33 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

Again I am stressing not my personal favorite music but ones I feel really did help a film in a large way.LOVE STORY- 70- I loved how FRANCIS LAI places the music for total emotional impact. It just worked so well to make this a classic tearjerker.-HER ALIBI-90= GEORGES DELERUE is THE MASTER FILM COMPOSER. while this film was ok, GEORGES MUSIC was so grand it was not of this earth.It makes you feel like you were SUPERMAN flying to unlimited heights, no offense on WILLIAMS SUPERMAN'S SCORE though.-

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 24, 2013 - 7:33 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

Only two more-KING KONG-33-STEINER-This score was a giant asset to the film-.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 24, 2013 - 7:33 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

delete

 
 Posted:   Sep 24, 2013 - 8:46 PM   
 By:   robertmro   (Member)

Land of the Pharaohs
The Charge of the Light Brigade (1936)
The Thief of Bagdad
Psycho
Captain From Castile
The Time Machine (1960)
The Magnificent Seven
Star Trek - The Motion Picture
Farewell, My Lovely (1975)
Invaders From Mars (1953)

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 24, 2013 - 9:12 PM   
 By:   barryfan   (Member)

A couple of so-so movies with scores that make them MUCH better:

Somewhere in Time

The Specialist

Legends of the Fall

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2013 - 12:59 AM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)

Since I've yet to see a film scored by John Barry for which his music did not improve the viewing experience (and I've seen most of them) I could list many more than 10 films without moving away from his library.

Avoiding the obvious choices such as Out of Africa, The Lion in Winter and Dances with Wolves where, in each case, the music score is a large component of the film's success, I would highlight:

The Ipcress File (the current BBC4 Sound of Cinema programme chose this score to start as being a perfect example of film music), The Tamarind Seed, Hanover Street, Robin and Marian, The Deep, Mercury Rising, Enigma ... and, my own favourite: The Last Valley. The list just goes on and on, and that's without mentioning JB007 smile

Away from Mr. Barry, there's a vast pool of other choices, too, and I would select: The Magnificent Seven - Elmer Bernstein - the best western score of all, IMHO; James Horner's Sneakers and Field of Dreams, both brilliant films which reach that magical level of pure entertainment so elusive to many other films.

In that each made the film more watchable, I could add several of John Williams's scores for the Star Wars and Indiana Jones series but as none of these come close to being favourite listens they would not make my "Top 10". On the other hand, I love much/most of the scores by Ennio Morricone (and I have the majority released) but, not having seen that many of the films, I can't say how effective each has been. As much as I like the Dollar scores I would opt for Il Clan dei Siciliani as being particularly effective. In a low-key way, his score to Disclosure is also very effective and a great listen.

Sorry, I'd struggle to name just 10 ... smile

Mitch

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2013 - 1:03 AM   
 By:   KonstantinosZ   (Member)

first two, by order of preference:

1. E.T. (John Williams)
2. Hook (John Williams)
-Batman Returns (Danny Elfman)
-Empire Strikes Back (John Williams)
-Schindler's List (John Williams)
-Legend (Jerry Goldsmith)
-Superman (John Williams)
-Braveheart (James Horner)
-Indiana Jones and Temple of Doom (John Williams)
-Conan the Barbarian (Basil Poledouris)

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2013 - 1:18 AM   
 By:   jenkwombat   (Member)

Ten of my favorites:

Star Wars
King Kong (1933)
Gone With The Wind
Psycho
Star Trek: The Motion Picture
On Her Majesty's Secret Service
Batman
Raiders of the Lost Ark
Superman: The Movie
Planet of the Apes

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2013 - 1:51 AM   
 By:   Dylan S   (Member)

1. Obsession (Bernard Herrmann)
2. The Ghost and Mrs. Muir (Bernard Herrmann)
3. Vertigo (Bernard Herrmann)
4. Fahrenheit 451 (Bernard Herrmann)
5. Spellbound (Miklos Rozsa)
6. Now, Voyager (Max Steiner)
7. A Patch of Blue (Jerry Goldsmith)
8. The Fury (John Williams)
9. To Kill a Mockingbird (Elmer Bernstein)
10. Pee-Wee's Big Adventure (Danny Elfman)

 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2013 - 2:22 AM   
 By:   Peter Greenhill   (Member)

Ben Hur (Rozsa)
Goldfinger (Barry)
Dirty Harry (Schifrin)
True Grit (Bernstein)
A Fistfull Of Dynamite (Morricone)
Taxi Driver (Herrmann)
Lawrence Of Arabia (Jarre)
The Umbrellas Of Cherbourg (Legrand)
How The West Was Won (A. Newman)
Alien (Goldsmith)

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2013 - 2:45 AM   
 By:   arthur grant   (Member)

Thanks to all for participating. All great selections. I've honestly thought about each and every one and can hear the music in my head for each one except for ONE!

To John: When and where? I mean come on man!....I'm stunned to see The Old Mill on any list about anything. I haven't even heard ABOUT that film since I was on that little ride on Disneyland. You know the one on the boat that goes into the whale's mouth...I think they call it the storybook ride or something! How many decades ago ...I don't know. Please tell us more or anything you can about that one. I thought it was completely lost, destroyed whatever.
Also, love your other choices. For North I was tossing up between Cleopatra and Spartacus. I keep going back and forth. But I think Cleopatra all in all is my choice as well (as far as the music's contribution)...I mean could anyone even imagine that movie without it??

To Dan: I'm right with you on The Blue Lagoon. What do we do with these films where the score is just way way so much more about what the film is about than anything else happening?



 
 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2013 - 7:00 AM   
 By:   geert custers   (Member)

1. Psycho (Herrmann)
2. Fahrenheit 451 (Herrmann)
3. Wild Strawberries (Nordgren)
4. Obsession (Herrmann)
5. Lust for Life (Rozsa)
6. A simple Plan (Elfman)
7. True Grit (Burwell)
8. To Kill a Mockingbird (Bernstein)
9. Planet of Apes (Goldsmith)
10. Papillon (Goldsmith)

This is an impossible task..... No Alfred Newman, no Rota, no Friedhofer, no Steiner, no Waxman, no Williams, no Thomas Newman, no ..........

Geert

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2013 - 7:07 AM   
 By:   geert custers   (Member)

So....another list

1. Who'afraid of Virginia Woolf (North)
2. Ghost and Mrs. Muir (Herrmann)
3. Omen (Goldsmith)
4. I Vitiloni (Rota)
5. Wrong Man (Herrmann)
6. Thief of Bagdad (Rozsa)
7. Shawshank Redemption (T. Newman)
8. The Robe (A. Newman)
9. Hangover Square (Herrmann)
10. Adventures of Don Juan (Steiner)

.........

Geert

 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2013 - 7:10 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

E.T.- Not my favorite film or favorite score, but I do believe the soundtrack was extremely important and carried the film.

Children Of a Lesser God- How on earth do you write a score for a film about a deaf person? Obviously the haunting and lonely underscore was designed to connect with the hearing person.
Masterfully done.



 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2013 - 7:16 AM   
 By:   bdm   (Member)

Good question; here is my answer (in alphabetical order):

BEN-HUR - M. Rozsa

EL CID - M. Rozsa

E.T. - J. Williams

GONE WITH THE WIND - M. Steiner

THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN - E. Bernstein

THE PLANET OF THE APES - J. Goldsmith

PSYCHO - B. Herrmann

THE SEA HAWK- E.W. Korngold

STAR WARS - J. Williams

THE TEN COMMANDMENTS - E. Bernstein

 
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