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 Posted:   Sep 23, 2013 - 7:09 AM   
 By:   KevinSmith   (Member)

Where would you rank the love theme to Wind and the Lion comparative to other Goldsmith love themes?

I remember someone here (As Khan would say, I never forget a face... but names certainly) once mentioning that he felt that the love theme was the weakest of the Wind and the Lion score. But I don't agree. The love theme in the score is one of the best love themes and it gets more touching the more times that it heard in the score (certainly by the ending, it makes an impact).

 
 Posted:   Sep 23, 2013 - 9:31 AM   
 By:   hurlburt.lazar227   (Member)

It certainly is one of his best in my book.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 23, 2013 - 10:41 AM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

I'd certainly rate it pretty highly, although I'm not the biggest fan of Goldsmith in romantic mode. He could get a bit mushy (all that heart-on-sleeve stuff such as RUDY - which isn't even a Love Theme as such - is dangerous for diabetics), and I find some of the melodies a little awkward, even from within my favourite Goldsmith period. Sort of bordering on the banal. Having said that, I do "love" the "love themes" from THE BLUE MAX, THE OMEN, LOGAN'S RUN, CHINATOWN.... plus there are beautiful little romantic themes in less well-known scores such as BREAKOUT. All of those share a kind of tender, subtle "trill" on the strings which is just gorgeous.

But I find a more profound sense of... humanity perhaps (?) in the Goldsmith scores which don't even have a Love Theme, such as THE ILLUSTRATED MAN.

Whatever, THE WIND AND THE LION is amongst my faves.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 23, 2013 - 10:43 AM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

"Love theme" is a commercialized and cliched term of limited utility. In this film, for example, the two characters move from anger to a degree of mutual respect and gratitude. But there is no question of an erotic attraction. By the way, the original "Eden Pedicaris" was a man! Credit the filmmakers at least some restraint in their re-imagining of the event.

 
 Posted:   Sep 23, 2013 - 12:25 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

..... I'm not the biggest fan of Goldsmith in romantic mode. He could get a bit mushy (all that heart-on-sleeve stuff such as RUDY - which isn't even a Love Theme as such - is dangerous for diabetics), and I find some of the melodies a little awkward, even from within my favourite Goldsmith period.

Whatever, THE WIND AND THE LION is amongst my faves.


Right .
WIND is by far the most beautiful he composed!
bruce

ps POWDER is pretty diabetic inducing also
smile

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 24, 2013 - 7:42 AM   
 By:   Vermithrax Pejorative   (Member)

There's a broken, tragic feel to his Love Theme from MAGIC, which I really dig.
WIND & THE LION is much more lush and dare I say, old-fashioned. Nowt wrong with that though, both make for great listening.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 24, 2013 - 8:43 AM   
 By:   Bob Bryden   (Member)

Saw this film in Vancouver in the Summer of '75. Literally one of the most epic, romantic periods of my life. The entire score served as it's soundtrack. The Love Theme is #1 in my Goldsmith list of such.

 
 Posted:   Sep 24, 2013 - 9:18 AM   
 By:   Basil Wrathbone   (Member)

Literally one of the most epic, romantic periods of my life.


One of them? How many epic periods have you had?

 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2013 - 7:53 PM   
 By:   KevinSmith   (Member)

Literally one of the most epic, romantic periods of my life.


One of them? How many epic periods have you had?


Depends if a man has a girlfriend or not. razz

 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2013 - 3:30 PM   
 By:   Ron Hardcastle   (Member)

To KevinSmith re: "The love theme in the score [for THE WIND AND THE LION] is one of the best love themes and it gets more touching the more times that it heard in the score....

I beg to differ! It is certainly lesser than the lyrical melodies that Goldsmith created for many other films, such as ISLANDS IN THE STREAM, RUDY, CHINATOWN, MASADA, LIONHEART, and especially THE SAND PEBBLES -- I adore "Getting Acquainted," with the melody that became the song "And We Were Lovers" sung so memorably by Matt Monro. And let's not forget the achingly beautiful "Ilia's Theme" from "Star Trek: The Motion Picture," which is wonderful. So I don't feel that the cue you cite from "The Wind And The Lion" comes anywhere near many other far more gorgeous melodies written by the great Jerry Goldsmith.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2013 - 5:35 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

I will go with RON on this, JERRY has given us loads of beautiful love themes that while I did enjoy the one from [wind and the lion] I would not put it up there with his say, top 30 or so.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2013 - 5:36 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

However it is still a good one.But trying to list JERRY'S melodic best is a fierce competition.

 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2013 - 8:05 PM   
 By:   Ron Hardcastle   (Member)

I'm glad you wouldn't put it in the top 30!!! But it just doesn't tug at my heartstrings!!!

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 27, 2013 - 8:24 AM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

A movie about a terrorist kidnapping and the strange rapport that develops between the warlord and his hostages -- and more importantly the long-distance parallel between the warlord and President Theodore Roosevelt. The whole thing done in a "mixed" style that blends old-fashioned adventure and present-day jingoism -- possibly with tongue in cheek.

The real question should be: Is this music really a "love theme" (to use the cliche term) and if so, why is such a theme appropriate here?

 
 Posted:   Nov 12, 2013 - 6:29 AM   
 By:   KevinSmith   (Member)

A movie about a terrorist kidnapping and the strange rapport that develops between the warlord and his hostages -- and more importantly the long-distance parallel between the warlord and President Theodore Roosevelt. The whole thing done in a "mixed" style that blends old-fashioned adventure and present-day jingoism -- possibly with tongue in cheek.

The real question should be: Is this music really a "love theme" (to use the cliche term) and if so, why is such a theme appropriate here?


You mean the Stockholm syndrome?

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 12, 2013 - 9:23 AM   
 By:   zooba   (Member)

It is a Love Theme on the Grand, Epic Scale. I give it a 10 out of 10, but I'll always turn it up to 11!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4xgx4k83zzc

 
 Posted:   Nov 12, 2013 - 9:47 AM   
 By:   The REAL BJBien   (Member)

I Remember [Love Theme] from THE WIND AND THE LION is certainly one of my all time favorite cues and it is an excellent release from Intrada.

I however wouldn't rank it in the TOP 10 of Goldsmith's scores but I do think it essentially to his TOP 20.

 
 Posted:   Nov 12, 2013 - 10:48 AM   
 By:   RoryR   (Member)

I beg to differ! It is certainly lesser than the lyrical melodies that Goldsmith created for many other films, such as ISLANDS IN THE STREAM, RUDY, CHINATOWN, MASADA, LIONHEART, and especially THE SAND PEBBLES

I must beg to differ, Ron! I think you must remember what the so-called "love theme" does in THE WIND AND THE LION. It is also a theme of lose of innocence and of remembrance.

The entire score of THE WIND AND THE LION is one of Goldsmith's greatest accomplishments. How many here would even be mentioning the movie if not for Goldsmith's score.

(Hope I'm not sounding pompous and condescending.)

 
 Posted:   Nov 12, 2013 - 11:14 AM   
 By:   Basil Wrathbone   (Member)

I think Goldsmith did great, flowing ROMANTIC themes, usually infused with a feeling of a quest being undertaken, or with an undercurrent of foreboding or mystery.
But when it comes to genuine LOVE themes, he seems to me as convincing as John Wayne would be doing a tender, smooching bedroom scene – just some wooden going-through-the-motions stuff until he gets back to the action he does best.

 
 Posted:   Nov 12, 2013 - 11:42 AM   
 By:   Ron Hardcastle   (Member)

Listening to it again just now, I stand by my original assessment, that if one wants to rate Goldsmith's "love themes" on some (probably pointless) scale, it isn't even in the top 10. But I'm happy that several here seem to adore it more than those others I originally cited. Good for you. As I continue to repeat, music is probably the most subjective of the arts and NONE of us react to it precisely the same.

 
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