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 Posted:   Sep 15, 2013 - 5:36 AM   
 By:   MOVIEBUFF   (Member)

WINDJAMMER A Review
I always had a love hate relationship with the LP soundtrack of WINDJAMMER, loved the lush orchestral music, but hated the sea shanties and source music, which had pride of place on the album. The huge contrast between tracks made for a rather unpleasant listening experience.
Well now after all those years SEPIA at last brings us the full score, 72 mins, and that’s just on the first of the two CDs in this set.
Lets begin this review by taking a look at the packaging, we have a ‘flipper’ booklet, you can choose the new artwork, or the original Lp design. The excellent 16 page colour booklet has a fascinating essay on the discovery of the original music tracks, and the restoration involved.
There are also notes on the film, Cinemiracle process, the music and of course composer Morton Gould.
Sound quality is very clear, with a slight stereo spread. We have the full score including Overture, Intermission and Exit music. Morton Gould has written a wonderful evocative seascape score, with massive orchestra producing a huge sound to match the size of the giant screen.
The second disc, is best treated as ‘extras’ you would be unlikely to play it very often, but still nice to have. The WINDJAMMER song is fun, also the rehearsal track fascinating. The ‘interview’ with Jack Shaindlin (conductor) is pretty poor, sort of a non interview type interview. To round things off we have the original LP tracks.
Worth adding to your collection, it’s a definite thumbs up from me. Well done SEPIA!

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 15, 2013 - 6:39 AM   
 By:   joec   (Member)

WINDJAMMER A Review
I always had a love hate relationship with the LP soundtrack of WINDJAMMER, loved the lush orchestral music, but hated the sea shanties and source music, which had pride of place on the album. The huge contrast between tracks made for a rather unpleasant listening experience.
Well now after all those years SEPIA at last brings us the full score, 72 mins, and that’s just on the first of the two CDs in this set.
Lets begin this review by taking a look at the packaging, we have a ‘flipper’ booklet, you can choose the new artwork, or the original Lp design. The excellent 16 page colour booklet has a fascinating essay on the discovery of the original music tracks, and the restoration involved.
There are also notes on the film, Cinemiracle process, the music and of course composer Morton Gould.
Sound quality is very clear, with a slight stereo spread. We have the full score including Overture, Intermission and Exit music. Morton Gould has written a wonderful evocative seascape score, with massive orchestra producing a huge sound to match the size of the giant screen.
The second disc, is best treated as ‘extras’ you would be unlikely to play it very often, but still nice to have. The WINDJAMMER song is fun, also the rehearsal track fascinating. The ‘interview’ with Jack Shaindlin (conductor) is pretty poor, sort of a non interview type interview. To round things off we have the original LP tracks.
Worth adding to your collection, it’s a definite thumbs up from me. Well done SEPIA!



What are the sources used for the LP tracks? Are they the original Columbia (now Sony) masters? Or, is this a vinyl to CD transfer?

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 15, 2013 - 6:59 AM   
 By:   Last Child   (Member)

The second disc, is best treated as ‘extras’ you would be unlikely to play it very often

I wouldnt objectively say disc 2 is wash out. Nothing personal, Moviebuff, since I wouldn want to offend someone as buff as you look. I do think that at least the two 'talking' tracks should have been added at the end. Part-nostalgia and part-change in taste allows me to enjoy the LP much more now.

What are the sources used for the LP tracks? Are they the original Columbia (now Sony) masters? Or, is this a vinyl to CD transfer?

Maybe I missed it in the Notes, but the only mention I saw was in the CD tracklist which says "1958 Columbia Record."
The rest were from 1/4 inch recording session tapes. The notes mention the "Columbia Records recording masters now owned by Sony" but not whether they were used.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 15, 2013 - 1:12 PM   
 By:   joec   (Member)

The second disc, is best treated as ‘extras’ you would be unlikely to play it very often

speaking for yourself, of course, as you didnt like the LP songs. The two 'talking' tracks should have been added at the end.

What are the sources used for the LP tracks? Are they the original Columbia (now Sony) masters? Or, is this a vinyl to CD transfer?

Maybe I missed it in the Notes, but the only mention I saw was in the CD tracklist which says "1958 Columbia Record."
The rest were from 1/4 inch recording session tapes. The notes mention the "Columbia Records recording masters now owned by Sony" but not whether they were used.
I have a strong suspicion the Columbia Sony masters we're not used

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 15, 2013 - 6:02 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Sepia isn't known for licensing anything of this vintage. Does the CD show a copyright notice for Columbia or Sony?

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 16, 2013 - 9:45 AM   
 By:   Jim Doherty   (Member)

Nice review. I agree with almost everything you said about the contents of the two CDs.

I would like to point out though that the "slight stereo spread" appears to have been acheived through filtering and reverb (listen carefully on headphones). However, I think it sounds really nice. It also sounds like they tried isolating certain frequencies and panning them at times (such as on the WINDJAMMER INTERMISSION MUSIC track). The only true stereo track appears to be the Entr'acte on disc 2. The Columbia LP has been left in straight mono, with no reverb added.

And, Bob, there is no credit given as to having lisenced anthything from Sony. Even the original album cover they reproduce is from a foriegn pressing on Philips.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 16, 2013 - 10:25 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

The Columbia LP has been left in straight mono, with no reverb added.


According to an interesting note on the WINDJAMMER LP that someone posted on Soundtrack Collector:

"Contrary to what the label states, the full musical score recording is in TRUE stereo, as recorded for the film's 7-channel stereo soundtrack. Only the monaurally recorded source cues (such as the Casals performance) have been 're-channelled.' "

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 16, 2013 - 12:01 PM   
 By:   Jim Doherty   (Member)

Bob, I posted about this in the other WINDJAMMER thread. I used to have the stereo reissue of the Columbia LP. I got rid of it a long time ago, but I still have a couple of cuts from it on tape. In my other post I came to the conclusion that the Columbia stereo LP was not real stereo. However, I just listened to those cuts again, and now I don't know what to think. They certainly have SOME kind stereo-like sound, yet the placement of the instruments is not really clearly defined. I wish I still had that LP so I could check the rest of the cuts.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 16, 2013 - 5:48 PM   
 By:   paulw   (Member)

Listened to disk 1 last nite. Nice recording and am glad I bought it. Reading the booklet that came with it and with the eminent release of the Cinerama Holiday blu-ray wonder if there will be a restored Morton Gould CD accompanying that as well??

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 16, 2013 - 6:28 PM   
 By:   jskoda   (Member)

Bob, I posted about this in the other WINDJAMMER thread. I used to have the stereo reissue of the Columbia LP. I got rid of it a long time ago, but I still have a couple of cuts from it on tape. In my other post I came to the conclusion that the Columbia stereo LP was not real stereo. However, I just listened to those cuts again, and now I don't know what to think. They certainly have SOME kind stereo-like sound, yet the placement of the instruments is not really clearly defined. I wish I still had that LP so I could check the rest of the cuts.

My listening convinces me the orchestra tracks on the LP are true stereo. As you say, not wide, dramatic stereo, but stereo.

But I don't think the (partially) stereo LP was ever released in the UK.


 
 Posted:   Sep 18, 2013 - 9:52 AM   
 By:   MOVIEBUFF   (Member)

Yes you are right, I still have the USA Columbia release, in 'electronic stereo', and indeed the orchestral tracks are in true stereo. Which made even more jarring the two types of music on the LP.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 20, 2013 - 7:56 PM   
 By:   Jim Doherty   (Member)

Well, I just won a stereo copy of the original Columbia WINDJAMMER LP on ebay (for $1.99!!!), so I am indeed looking forward to hearing all of the true stereo cuts.

 
 Posted:   Sep 21, 2013 - 10:15 AM   
 By:   George Komar   (Member)

The Columbia LP program on Disc 2 is definitely from monaural vinyl (probably the European Philips LP the cover of which is on the flipside of the CD cover). What betrays the LP source is a loud digitally processed "click" about fifteen seconds into the LP track "Night Watch (Lullaby)," composed by Morton Gould, a defect that could have very easily been eliminated, had not Robin Cherry, who did the "restoration" for Sepia, inexcusably fallen asleep "on the night watch," so to speak.

The first three bonus tracks on side 2 (Prologue and Main Title, Entr'acte and The Windjammer Song) I suspect are from the new Windjammer Blu-Ray Smilebox release. Was The Windjammer Song composed by Terry Gilkyson? No background info is provided for this, nor are we told how any of the tracks on Disc 2 dovetail with those on the first disc.

Nevertheless, the Morton Gould score on Disc 1 is reason enough to purchase this CD set. Its source is a set of five 10-1/2-inch NAB-hub 1/4-inch tape reels that were preserved by Cinerama/Cinemiracle audio engineer Richard Pietchmann and which were presented by his sons to Dave Strohmaier, the Cinerama historian who is restoring the old Cinerama 3-strip films and who was the producer of the "Cinerama Adventure" documentary. Robert C. Weisberger, who is currently involved in the digital restoration of the "Cinerama Holiday" recording sessions (along with Widescreen Museum website curator Marty Hart), arranged to have the tapes sent to Audio Mechanics in Burbank for "baking" and digital resoration and archiving by John Polito. The Gould score is a delight to listen to and there are not many Morton Gould film score CDs out there, so Disc 1 is a true treasure. The Pietchmann tapes must have been personal safety copies preserved in mono -- very good mono, but still mono -- yet they currently remain the only surviving document of Gould's magical score.

Sepia Records will also be releasing the above-mentioned "Cinerama Holiday - The Recently Discovered Oyster Bay Sessions" along with a "digitally enhanced stereo version" of the original LP, plus "a true stereo remaster" of the "Seven Wonders Of The World" European LP. I suspect that issuing all of this material through Sepia Records is one way of circumventing proper copyright channels and allowing the music to be quickly released for the benefit of golden age film score aficionados still appreciative of these works but whose numbers are dwindling by attrition.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2013 - 10:14 AM   
 By:   Jim Doherty   (Member)

Just got my WINDJAMMER stereo Columbia LP. Yep, everyone was right, the orchestral cuts are indeed in true stereo. It doesn't sound like it was close-miked, so you don't get really obvious left or right positioning of instruments most of the time, although there ARE noticeable moments when you do. It's mostly more of a large hall ambience.Too bad Sepia couldn't have latched onto these for their CD.

 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2013 - 11:08 AM   
 By:   George Komar   (Member)

Just got my WINDJAMMER stereo Columbia LP. Yep, everyone was right, the orchestral cuts are indeed in true stereo. It doesn't sound like it was close-miked, so you don't get really obvious left or right positioning of instruments most of the time, although there ARE noticeable moments when you do. It's mostly more of a large hall ambiance. Too bad Sepia couldn't have latched onto these for their CD.

I agree, but I think this CD came out the discovery of the Richard Pietchmann personal mono tapes and was released through Sepia Records for the reasons that I gave above.

The most recent TRUE GRIT and THE WHITE DAWN CDs were sourced respectively from Bernstein's and Mancini's personal mono tape copies, so the situation with WINDJAMMER is very similar, and the CD1 mastering is very good.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2013 - 11:43 AM   
 By:   Jim Doherty   (Member)

George, I agree with you about CD 1. I too thought the mastering was fine. I have no problem with the mono tapes being used for that, if that's all there was left of the scoring sessions. I'm happy to have the full score in whatever format.

I just meant that it was too bad Sepia didn't include the Columbia stereo tracks during the LP presentation on CD 2.

 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2013 - 5:35 PM   
 By:   George Komar   (Member)

I just meant that it was too bad Sepia didn't include the Columbia stereo tracks during the LP presentation on CD 2.

Yes, I doubt that they were even aware of the Columbia stereo tracks. Sadly.

A proper soundtrack label would have done its homework.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2013 - 7:19 PM   
 By:   joec   (Member)

George, I agree with you about CD 1. I too thought the mastering was fine. I have no problem with the mono tapes being used for that, if that's all there was left of the scoring sessions. I'm happy to have the full score in whatever format.

I just meant that it was too bad Sepia didn't include the Columbia stereo tracks during the LP presentation on CD 2.


Sepia would have to license the LP tracks from SONY. I doubt very much that was considered. An LP to CD transfer under the Euro 50 year rule would be more appropriate for Sepia.

 
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