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 Posted:   Aug 30, 2013 - 12:32 PM   
 By:   Sigerson Holmes   (Member)

I was listening to "Players" again just to enjoy the fact that I ordered it when I had the chance (and had the money), and it's not only one of those Goldsmith scores that forces one to wonder, "WOW, what 'Players' movie did HE see?!" but it's also got one of his great 6/8 marches, "ST:TMP" being the most famous I guess. "It's tempting to say something like, 'No one did a 6/8 march like Goldsmith,' but that got me thinking . . . who DID? I remember a few seconds of a 6/8 march in the underscore of "In Harm's Way," which I think didn't make it onto the album. What are some other favorite 6/8 marches, Goldsmith or otherwise?

At the moment, I'm only coming up with Conti's "Falcon Crest." Are there some famous examples from the classical repertoire which may have inspired the above examples, and/or others in film/TV music?

 
 Posted:   Aug 30, 2013 - 12:55 PM   
 By:   YOR The Hunter From The Future   (Member)

Yes, YOR also loves those marchs from master...

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 30, 2013 - 2:45 PM   
 By:   Matt S.   (Member)

I was listening to "Players" again just to enjoy the fact that I ordered it when I had the chance (and had the money), and it's not only one of those Goldsmith scores that forces one to wonder, "WOW, what 'Players' movie did HE see?!" but it's also got one of his great 6/8 marches, "ST:TMP" being the most famous I guess. "It's tempting to say something like, 'No one did a 6/8 march like Goldsmith,' but that got me thinking . . . who DID? I remember a few seconds of a 6/8 march in the underscore of "In Harm's Way," which I think didn't make it onto the album. What are some other favorite 6/8 marches, Goldsmith or otherwise?

At the moment, I'm only coming up with Conti's "Falcon Crest." Are there some famous examples from the classical repertoire which may have inspired the above examples, and/or others in film/TV music?


Patton immediately comes to mind. Also JW's Midway March is written in 12/8.

There are many other examples outside of film music. Sousa's Washington Post March and the US Air Force theme, Wild Blue Yonder, are just two off the top of my head.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 30, 2013 - 4:42 PM   
 By:   TPC   (Member)

Wasn't Williams' Superman March in 12/8?

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 30, 2013 - 5:42 PM   
 By:   chromaparadise   (Member)

Don't mean to rain on anyone's parade (or get too musically technical) but the MIDWAY and SUPERMAN marches are written in 12/8 but is actually a compound (quadruple) meter. In 12/8 there are 4 beats (with 3 contained within each beat). In other words, it could be (and sometimes is) denoted as 4/4.

Count, 1-2-3 four times...thus the 12/8. I suppose it's easier to write 12/8 than annotating all of those triplet figures in 4/4.

A case in point is Goldsmith's PLANET OF THE APES cue "The Search Continues." Before the Astronauts encounter the "Scarecrows" the score is marked 12/8, but the French Horn and Alto Flute line is marked 4/4.

STAR TREK-TMP is truly Jerry's greatest march...Thanks to the faith Robert Wise had in his composer!

 
 Posted:   Aug 30, 2013 - 5:59 PM   
 By:   Sigerson Holmes   (Member)

Don't mean to rain on anyone's parade (or get too musically technical) . . .

Not at all! Musical tech-talk IS the parade in this thread.

It now occurs to me that I might not be able to identify a march's meter just by listening to it. I'd probably need to see some sheet music to understand how "Patton" and "Superman" match the meter we're discussing, for instance.

Perhaps I'm thinking more of the exciting style of orchestration where the time is kept by the French horn section, while the long-lined melody comes in in a lower register, and eventually, as if things don't sound exciting enough, he starts in with the syncopated rhythms and brings in that tambourine for a "galloping into the sunset" effect. Is there a musical/technical term for this style of march?

 
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