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 Posted:   Aug 24, 2013 - 12:05 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Can anyone tell me if this is a known scam and what exactly is the scam? The last few days I am receiving packages for items I didn't order or pay for from FedEx.

The packages are coming 2 day air. One supposedly came from HP. It was a Styles pen for a tablet.
I did not order this. The packing slip didn't mention the cost. (I did send an email to HP customer support and awaiting a reply.)

However today I got another FedEx package. This from Mega Retail Store. And this time I got an Android 4! Another sales receipt with no mention of cost.

My first concern was someone hacked into my bank account or credit card and was ordering these things. (But why send them to my address?) I checked my bank accounts and credit cards and there are no unauthorized charges or withdrawals.

Again keep in mind neither packing slip shows any charge for these items either.

At this point I noticed both packing slips look the same. Just the name of the companies were different. In other words the originating addresses were the same though I got two items from two different retailers according to the packing slips. So I Googled the address and its some distribution center in TN.

Whats going on? Or a better way of putting it. WTF?! confused

 
 Posted:   Aug 24, 2013 - 12:11 PM   
 By:   mastadge   (Member)

Maybe there's someone else with your name and a different address and some computer system has got its data crossed?

 
 Posted:   Aug 24, 2013 - 12:33 PM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

Maybe you won a competition and didn't get the e-mail notification. Maybe you somehow enlisted with a product trial survey company.


A long time a ago, a guy I knew had a friend, an accountant apparently, who sent a message to a lady he knew, to be at a certain spot in London on her birthday. He then paid several people he knew in London, total strangers to the lady, to walk past her in the street as she waited at the appointed place, and each handing her a single VEGETABLE without saying a word, then moving on.

The poor woman was mystified, and at the end of the afternoon had an armful of raw cabbages, carrots, turnips, etc., and no idea what was happening.

There was no reason to it, very Bunuel-like.

Some people are like that.

 
 Posted:   Aug 24, 2013 - 12:39 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Thanks for the responses. Thus far I called FedEx and they said to contact the retailers directly. I also talked to my bank and they said there are no "alerts" or issues with my account. Which I already confirmed by logging into my account. Perhaps I somehow won a "prize" as suggested. Though I don't remember entering into any contests. Can't think of anyone whom would give me this as a present.

 
 Posted:   Aug 24, 2013 - 1:00 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Alright this gets weirder. I searched online for the store I got the Android tablet from and I got a page that said the website is under development, and should be up in the first quarter of 2013. There is no way to contact them. (If they even exist) Also the address of the distribution center these items came from appears to be for sale.

 
 Posted:   Aug 24, 2013 - 3:27 PM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)

I remember in my Consumer Education class back in high school that any package I might receive for which I did not pay can be considered a gift. So you might not be on the hook for the cost of them.

Maybe you could hang on to them until it gets resolved to your satisfaction, rather than giving them away or using them. (Isn't that the kind of prudence what they taught you at the Starfleet Porpoise Academy? smile )

 
 Posted:   Aug 24, 2013 - 3:27 PM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)

I will say, though, this is an interesting story, Solium!

 
 Posted:   Aug 24, 2013 - 4:30 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

I will say, though, this is an interesting story, Solium!

Crazy for sure! I know according to US laws I can keep what ever is delivered to my residence. Though I won't assume I can (or should keep it). While I try to work this out the items will remain in their packages unopened.

Ive discovered the two packages I received have the wrong phone numbers on them. (for the recipient) One is local but for another residence, the other can be any of three businesses in CA.

 
 Posted:   Aug 24, 2013 - 5:42 PM   
 By:   The Projectionist   (Member)

I will say, though, this is an interesting story, Solium!

Crazy for sure! I know according to US laws I can keep what ever is delivered to my residence. Though I won't assume I can (or should keep it). While I try to work this out the items will remain in their packages unopened.

Ive discovered the two packages I received have the wrong phone numbers on them. (for the recipient) One is local but for another residence, the other can be any of three businesses in CA.



On monday you will recieve another package containing a Photo ID and Passport with a differfent name, $5000 cash, a 9mm pistol, and a plane ticket for an express flight to Dubai. You'll also notice a napkin from a certain Casino with the hand written message
"Come Alone, Tell No One. Bring the Iphone and Stylus with you. -T.K."

 
 Posted:   Aug 24, 2013 - 6:43 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

I will say, though, this is an interesting story, Solium!

Crazy for sure! I know according to US laws I can keep what ever is delivered to my residence. Though I won't assume I can (or should keep it). While I try to work this out the items will remain in their packages unopened.

Ive discovered the two packages I received have the wrong phone numbers on them. (for the recipient) One is local but for another residence, the other can be any of three businesses in CA.



On monday you will recieve another package containing a Photo ID and Passport with a differfent name, $5000 cash, a 9mm pistol, and a plane ticket for an express flight to Dubai. You'll also notice a napkin from a certain Casino with the hand written message
"Come Alone, Tell No One. Bring the Iphone and Stylus with you. -T.K."


Funny, but I almost believe that!

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 24, 2013 - 8:44 PM   
 By:   MikeP   (Member)

One of my coworkers somehow got involved in some similar sounding situation, where packages were mailed to her and she was supposed to send them to some other address...a reshipping scam ...

https://www.uspis.gov/radDocs/consumer/ReshippingScam.html

"Criminals post job announcements on Internet career sites offering work-at-home positions—sometimes advertised as “merchandising manager” or “package processing assistant.” Duties include receiving packages and mailing them to a foreign address on behalf of a client, using postage-paid mailing labels provided via email -
The real story? It’s a scam!
If you accept the job, you’ll receive packages containing one of two things:
Merchandise bought with stolen credit cards—the scammer needs your help to smuggle the goods out of the country.
Counterfeit postal money orders—the scammer wants your help to distribute them to other scammers "



I told her to just stop and report to to the USPS, but I think she ended up keeping most of the merchandise... she was a crazy bitch anyway razz

This sounds like the same thing...I'd just take the stuff to you local Postmaster...

 
 Posted:   Aug 25, 2013 - 7:06 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Well I can tell you I haven't accepted any work at home jobs. Or am I having an online relationship with anyone from some unknown country. wink No point in leaving it at the PO since it came FedEx. And I already called FedEx and they don't really care why unpaid merchandise is being shipped to me.

 
 Posted:   Aug 25, 2013 - 3:43 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

It's fraud. frown Someone got hold of my personal info and opened fake accounts. I'm not the only one. Apparently one merchant I talked too said they got a lot of fraud claims the last few days. So keep your eyes open. It appears to be wide spread.

 
 Posted:   Aug 25, 2013 - 4:27 PM   
 By:   Sirusjr   (Member)

It's fraud. frown Someone got hold of my personal info and opened fake accounts. I'm not the only one. Apparently one merchant I talked too said they got a lot of fraud claims the last few days. So keep your eyes open. It appears to be wide spread.

Yikes, identity theft? That sucks.

Seems like a strange way for a thief to do it considering you were tipped off by getting the strange shipments.

 
 Posted:   Aug 25, 2013 - 5:42 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

It's fraud. frown Someone got hold of my personal info and opened fake accounts. I'm not the only one. Apparently one merchant I talked too said they got a lot of fraud claims the last few days. So keep your eyes open. It appears to be wide spread.

Yikes, identity theft? That sucks.

Seems like a strange way for a thief to do it considering you were tipped off by getting the strange shipments.


Yeah I don't understand why they had the packages delivered to me which would obviously tip me off. But there is no question it's identity theft. They used my info to open a PayPal Bill Me Later account and started to purchase things. PayPal pays for the items up front and bills me for them.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 26, 2013 - 1:15 AM   
 By:   manderley   (Member)

It's fraud. frown Someone got hold of my personal info and opened fake accounts. I'm not the only one. Apparently one merchant I talked too said they got a lot of fraud claims the last few days. So keep your eyes open. It appears to be wide spread.


How did you go about discovering it was fraud, Solium?

What discovery processes did you follow to allow you to determine this?

Have you been able to systematically begin to clear things up with vendors
who have your name and account (fraudulently) in their files?

Have you had to cancel (and have reissued) all your credit cards?

Was there any one site that seems to have been the trigger for the
original theft of your information? Have you been able to trace that?

Have you discovered any federal agency to report these things to which can
assist you, not only in clearing up your issues, but in also giving them a dossier
for their files to investigate on behalf of others who might be in the same situation?
(As they build an ongoing report they are also building an ongoing case for prosecu-
tion.)

I'm really sorry this has happened to you---I'm sorry to ask you all these
questions. But all of us should be aware of your experiences and how
to deal with them (if we can.)

Please keep us posted as you are able and thanks for posting this in the first
place. Wishing you good luck in pursuing avenues of remedy for your problems.



 
 Posted:   Aug 26, 2013 - 6:53 AM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)


I know according to US laws I can keep what ever is delivered to my residence. Though I won't assume I can (or should keep it).

That's not entirely true. Whomever told you that, is not correct. For example, it's a Federal crime to open mail not addressed to you, even if it is delivered to your address. Or if the pckage or envelope contains something like, for example a check, and you somehow manage to cash it (I know, it seems unlikely, but it happens), that money isn't yours just because it was incorrectly delivered to you.


It's hard to keep your identificationb protected when ever month you are hearing of data breeches and personal data accidently exposed. Just last month, the I.R.S accidently exposed thousands of social security numbers online. Over 260,000 customer's data at TD Bank were exposed in 2012. Over 2.5 million people in California have had their data exposed, half of which incluides social security numbers. In 2012, over 450,000 login and passwords were hacked for Yahoo! users and put online for other people to see.

Which, by the way, reminds me of a funny story. back in February, 2012, it was reported Syrian government officials had their e-mails hacked. The hackers were using what amounted to passwords you could litterally hear as a comedy bit in "Spaceballs" -- 'cause people, some people, are so stupid, they actually use bonehead passwords. Turns out these government officials there, were using passwords like "iloveyou" and, as hard as it is to believe, "1234".

 
 Posted:   Aug 26, 2013 - 7:10 AM   
 By:   Francis   (Member)


Which, by the way, reminds me of a funny story. back in February, 2012, it was reported Syrian government officials had their e-mails hacked. The hackers were using what amounted to passwords you could litterally hear as a comedy bit in "Spaceballs" -- 'cause people, some people, are so stupid, they actually use bonehead passwords. Turns out these government officials there, were using passwords like "iloveyou" and, as hard as it is to believe, "1234".


Most people use extremely easy passwords to figure out simply for the sake of remembering them; birthdays, address, names of relatives, loved ones, favorite sports team... . Nowadays when you're asked to type a pasword the page will usually tell you how secure it is, I am often surprised when I think it's secure enough (with a variation of numbers and capital/regular letters), it still tells me it's only 'medium' safe.

 
 Posted:   Aug 26, 2013 - 7:33 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

@ Manderley

For what ever reason the person buying stuff in my name had the packages delivered right to my own address. When I received a Stylus pen that I did not order two day air via FedEx I was suspicious right away. There were immediate warning signs.

So I emailed the company that the stylus pen was ordered from. It took a little bit of sharing information and a few emails from them to find out a fake email and account was set up in my name. Further more, the big tip off was that the person paid for the items with PayPay Bill Me Later option.

So this lead me to calling PayPal. Someone indeed opened up a Bill Me Later account in my name. I won't say what info they had or used, but will say they had enough info to convince PayPal to open that account.

PayPal is the real problem here. Apparently as long as they have minimal information, where they can do a credit check, they will approve anyone for a Bill Me Later account. This person was approved and purchased things with Bill Me Later. How this works is, PayPal pays for the items up front! Then bills the Bill Me Later customer later. (Which in this case would have been me) If the packages were not sent to my address it would have been weeks before I knew this was going on. (When ever Bill Me Later sent out billing notices to me)

I feel secure that neither my computer or bank was compromised in this attack. Apparently no bank account or CC info was required to set up a Bill Me Later account. None of my online accounts have been changed and there was some information they apparently did not get.

I also was told by one vender they've been getting more than usual amount of fraud complaints from people the last few days. Which makes me think a local or national data base was hacked into and I am not alone.

So the scam appears to center around setting up a Pay Pal Bill Me Later account in other peoples names.

My advice to everyone is to call PayPal and ask if there is a Bill Me Later account opened in your name which you did not approve.

Edit: I have to file a police report with my local authorities. I am also getting paperwork from the companies involved where I have to fill out fraud claims. I got a lot of work ahead of me.

Edit 2: Just found out they opened two Bill Me Later accounts in my name. Wonderful! mad

Edit 3: I learned why the package was addressed to me. That is so the order doesn't look suspicious. Once the crook gets confirmation email the item is shipped, they try to get the package rerouted to another location. I was told companies (Like FedEx) are cracking down on rerouting once an item is shipped.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

@ Justin Boggan

The mail was addressed to me. Both the name on the package and the address. That said, I never assumed I could keep the items (or would I feel comfortable doing so since I did not pay for them.) The packages remain unopened and will be sent back to the places they came from. I would only keep the items if the authorities said I could, or if there was no way to know where they came from.

 
 Posted:   Aug 26, 2013 - 7:36 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)


Which, by the way, reminds me of a funny story. back in February, 2012, it was reported Syrian government officials had their e-mails hacked. The hackers were using what amounted to passwords you could litterally hear as a comedy bit in "Spaceballs" -- 'cause people, some people, are so stupid, they actually use bonehead passwords. Turns out these government officials there, were using passwords like "iloveyou" and, as hard as it is to believe, "1234".


Most people use extremely easy passwords to figure out simply for the sake of remembering them; birthdays, address, names of relatives, loved ones, favorite sports team... . Nowadays when you're asked to type a pasword the page will usually tell you how secure it is, I am often surprised when I think it's secure enough (with a variation of numbers and capital letters), it still tells me it's only 'medium' safe.




http://strongpasswordgenerator.com/ wink

 
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