Film Score Monthly
FSM HOME MESSAGE BOARD FSM CDs FSM ONLINE RESOURCES FUN STUFF ABOUT US  SEARCH FSM   
Search Terms: 
Search Within:   search tips 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
 Posted:   Aug 31, 2013 - 2:07 PM   
 By:   MKRUltra   (Member)

On the note of album completeness, does anyone know how close to complete Powaaqatsi and Naqoyqatsi are?

Chris.

They both contain all the movements from the scores, just edited down by a few minutes in some cases, like the opening cue from Powaqqatsi and "Massman" from Naqoyqatsi. Unfortunately some really good cello passages from the latter were trimmed from the album.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 3, 2013 - 9:51 AM   
 By:   captain_avis   (Member)

I was impatient for this release and didn't want to wait for a pressed disk to arrive, so I took the plunge on the iTunes release. I don't think too many people are going to be bothered by the missing 7 or 8 minutes of music on this one.

I am a huge fan of Koyaanisqatsi and, particularly, Naqoyqatsi. In fact I would put the latter score as one of the top 10 scores of the 2000s and so I'm sad to report that, after a couple of listens, I'm not finding much to recommend on this one. If you were to take the dullest, dreariest sections of Koya- and Naqoy- and expand those to album length, you might get something approximating Visitors.

Maybe, I'll find something in this work with a few more listens, but for right now, this one goes down as a crushing disappointment. Anyone else have any thoughts?

Chris.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 6, 2013 - 12:20 PM   
 By:   captain_avis   (Member)

I've been listening to Visitors on and off for a few days now and my opinion of it has risen. It's still a considerably more subdued piece than the Qatsi trilogy and is weaker than those scores. It suffers for the lack of a choral element and prominent instrumental soloists that characterized the earlier works. Has anyone else had a chance to hear it?

Here's an article about the forthcoming premier of visitors including the score to be played live to screen:

http://arts.nationalpost.com/2013/09/06/heart-of-glass-the-music-of-tiff-from-orchestras-to-fictional-songwriters/

Chris

 
 Posted:   Sep 6, 2013 - 3:44 PM   
 By:   MKRUltra   (Member)

Thanks for the article. Really hope I get to see the film in a cinema instead of having to wait for Blu-ray. I'll be getting the score soon enough -- I'm just getting over my indignation at having to drop $10 for a download razz

 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2013 - 4:51 PM   
 By:   MKRUltra   (Member)

Finally got the CD and listened to it last night and this morning. Sadly, like Chris said, this is sort of a disappointment. It's very solid, and "Gone" is beautiful, and the "theme" that bookends the score is very interesting, but much of what comes between is Glass at both his most intensely minimalist and, unfortunately, kind of banal. It's certainly not excellent like Powaqqatsi and Naqoyqatsi, and definitely not in the league of a masterpiece like Koyaanisqatsi. Hopefully it'll deepen on repeat listens. One of the things I think really hampers it is just how very dry the recording and performance are. :/

Still can't wait to see the film, though.

 
 Posted:   Oct 13, 2013 - 3:30 PM   
 By:   SchiffyM   (Member)

I agree with the posters above. This score is certainly not without interest, but it's a very long slog with not a whole lot of variation. All the (long) pieces are of a type, and while there is beauty in them, for me they don't really reward a close listen. What's great about the Glass scores (and symphonies) I love is that the sort of slow meditations that make up the entirety of this album are alternated with some truly audacious writing. Not here. I'm sure it's what the film needed, but as a listening experience, it's of minimal interest. (Yes, that's a pun.)

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 30, 2014 - 11:45 AM   
 By:   captain_avis   (Member)

I agree with the posters above. This score is certainly not without interest, but it's a very long slog with not a whole lot of variation. All the (long) pieces are of a type, and while there is beauty in them, for me they don't really reward a close listen. What's great about the Glass scores (and symphonies) I love is that the sort of slow meditations that make up the entirety of this album are alternated with some truly audacious writing. Not here. I'm sure it's what the film needed, but as a listening experience, it's of minimal interest. (Yes, that's a pun.)

I've just finished watching the film. I like the earlier Reggio / Glass films, but this one, like its score, is a slog. The main conceit is that the film consists of a number of slow motion shots of people looking at the camera, alternating with shots of landscapes. It's an interesting idea, but it doesn't really work at feature film length.

Chris.

 
 Posted:   Aug 30, 2014 - 2:23 PM   
 By:   MKRUltra   (Member)

I saw the film at its NYC cinema premiere, with Glass and Reggio in attendance, and the images were spellbinding onscreen. The climactic "Gone" section was very haunting. I can see how it wouldn't translate as well to smaller screens at home, though.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 30, 2014 - 4:58 PM   
 By:   nerfTractor   (Member)

I saw the film at its NYC cinema premiere, with Glass and Reggio in attendance, and the images were spellbinding onscreen. The climactic "Gone" section was very haunting. I can see how it wouldn't translate as well to smaller screens at home, though.

Same here (although I saw it in Dallas without film makers present). The film ended up winning me over, but it was touch and go. Musically, "Gone" is definitely the highlight, and has become one of my favorite Glass pieces. Don't know if I will sit patiently through the film again but it was striking and memorable and I've come to really enjoy the score.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 31, 2014 - 7:18 AM   
 By:   Smaug   (Member)

I think the film may be "slow" but it's Reggio's way of slamming the brakes on civilization. His thing has always been making the viewer see the world in a different way...seeing the faces in slow motion was intense and made me feel a tremendous empathy. Reggio said that in a normal 30 second commercial, there's something like 75 edits. His film is 87 minutes long and has 75 edits.

My only commentary is that with the pace of the film being what it is, there was no opportunity to write fast music. Consequently it's almost 90 minutes of slow or moderate tempo music.

It's not user friendly like the other three films that lend themselves to repeated viewings...I've seen Visitors twice and I think I'm good. But it was a good and interesting film.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 31, 2014 - 9:48 AM   
 By:   captain_avis   (Member)

Thanks for your responses, guys.

I watched the film on my laptop during a plane ride with headphones in. Hearing the responses here, I'm thinking that I should watch it again in a more immersive environment... maybe at home with the lights out. I'd love to have seen it on the big screen, but it never came to my smallish city.

My initial response to the film may have been colored by the fact that Naqoyqatsi is my absolute favorite Glass score, and in my top 5 scores of the 2000s. Consequently, the weaker Visitors seemed like even more of a disappointment.

Chris

 
 Posted:   Aug 31, 2014 - 8:01 PM   
 By:   MKRUltra   (Member)

I initially felt much the same as you, as you can see from my earlier posts in the thread, but I've since really warmed to the Visitors score. It's not Koyaanisqatsi or Naqoyqatsi, but there is still a lot to admire in it, and "Gone" is one of the most beautiful things Glass has ever written.

 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
© 2014 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved.