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 Posted:   Jul 15, 2013 - 10:30 AM   
 By:   LeHah   (Member)

Says the person who is always offending and mocking people whose opinions he does not agree.

Hypocrite alarm just sounded!


You're missing a couple of words to make that a proper sentence. Care to try again?

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2013 - 10:33 AM   
 By:   Kim Tong   (Member)

I am a little confused and disappointed in drivingmissdaisy. Yor's last thread was locked because the direction it had turned and drivingmissdaisy opens another thread a few hours later to fuel Yor's madness? Why can we not let the boards administrators do their job and just you just ignore Yor? I am partially on Yor's side concerning Zimmer and his recent score, but I am even getting sick of Yor's posts. drivingmissdaisy also opens a non film score discussion on the film score discussion side?

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2013 - 10:49 AM   
 By:   jkirkfsm   (Member)

Instead of continuing this as a individual personal discussion, I'll try to hijack this into a film score discussion.

This is, I think, only my second post here, after lurking since... well, when the site was formed. I always look to see what Yor is up to. I find Yor highly entertaining, sometimes laugh out loud funny, and while sometimes one-note, almost always coming from a place I can understand.

And I don't think I'm the only one: witness more than a 1000 views of this thread already. Yes, it's a little like watching a car crash, I'll admit. Really who can look away? But there's more to it than that, for most people, I hope.

A lot of what I agree with in Yor's comments comes back to the nature of the movie-bidness itself these days. There are fine actors out there. There are fine composers. There are fine films. It's just that 99% of the movie audience will never go see them and that 99% of the movie business isn't geared to those people any more. It's geared toward 13 year olds who love explosions, noise, and cartoon characters who would be just too stupid and one dimensional to grace any self-respecting graphic novel. It's an interesting inversion: today's comic books are far more demanding of the reader's intelligence than the majority of todays comic book-based movies.

It makes you want to scream. I have no idea what a Yor scream would sound like, but I bet it makes me want to make that noise.

I'm a huge admirer of Jerry Goldsmith's soundtracks. To my mind, nobody was more brilliant. I'm in awe of anyone who has the ability to hear in their own heads music that has never been heard before, but Goldsmith also heard sounds that nobody had ever heard before, found instruments or pots and pans that made those sounds, and incorportated that into his music. Goldsmith in the 60s was genius. In the 70s he was great. In the 80s, well maybe he started to lose a litle of his spark, but look at what more and more he was being given to work with. Occasionally, he was able to twist an assignment for a truly wretched movie a little, like the Inchon score which seems a little like a parody of the horribly steriotypical 1940s/50s B films, or Congo, where he almost pulls off a Curtis Mayfield Superfly subversion of the entire movie with his music, but mostly the films he scored weren't good enough or bad enough to provide any hook into character or incident or inspiration. By the 90s, there hardly anything of worth except Trek.

I see so many movies that could have been helped with a better score. Perhaps not made watchable, but helped. Think of what Goldsmith, or Herrmann or Barry, or... well, anyone with talent could have done for The Golden Compass. Desblot's score was nothing but toneless noise, which is what he seems to specialize in. Even the New Yorker or New York Times recently reviewed one of his projects as having been torpedoed by the awful score.

Any movie that is reviewed as the year's most over-wraught, incoherent piece of psycho-sexual hysteria (the most recent Batman, a Plan 9 from Outer Space with a $100,000,000 budget) is required viewing for anyone who loves movies. But why do you have to be subjected to an aural assault while trying to defend yourself from simultaneous attacks to your eyes and brain? It is fair, I think, to believe that the producers have embraced the old saying: "It's so loud I can't even hear myself think." Exactly. Because if you could hear yourself think, you'd hear: "What a piece of crap. How do I get outta here?"

So I think Yor is making a valid point in a uniquely Yor-ish way, and it's one that I appreciate. We haven't seen The End of Film As We Know It. (Yet.) But we have seen the end of thoughtful, well-crafted film with characters and a meaningful story to tell, at least in wide release. While indie films can be quietly spectacular and beautiful, they're made with $30-40 budgets. That leaves maybe six bucks for the composer. Probably not as much as a television show might get. Goldsmith might have written 6 or 8 soundtracks in a single year in his prime. Barry or Kamen or any number of others, one or two. And they would be good!

We're never going to hear people like these again, or soundracks like these again. If for no other reason than the economics of the kind of films they did their best work for just isn't there.

To prove my point: how may people on this board have actually been excited about about a new Varese release for a current film? Compare that to how many people on this board have been excited about a La La Land or FSM or Intrada release of a soundtrack from 10, 15, even 40 (ST TOS) years ago?

A decade or two ago, I'd scan the newspaper ads for new movies every week, looking for Goldsmith's name in the super tiny print, hoping for a new score.

The last decade or so, the new soundtracks mostly make me want to scream in Yor-anguish.

 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2013 - 10:49 AM   
 By:   YOR The Hunter From The Future   (Member)

You're missing a couple of words to make that a proper sentence. Care to try again?

YOR could point how hypocrite Despicable Guy Looking Ugly At His Bevereage is by using his own tribal language, but them DGLUAHB would never be able to understand it...

But, then again, when people say nasty things towards the way people expresse themselves in other languages it is the ultimate proof that what was said is right ono spot, yes?

 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2013 - 10:59 AM   
 By:   YOR The Hunter From The Future   (Member)

Instead of continuing this as a individual personal discussion, I'll try to hijack this into a film score discussion.

This is, I think, only my second post here, after lurking since... well, when the site was formed. I always look to see what Yor is up to. I find Yor highly entertaining, sometimes laugh out loud funny, and while sometimes one-note, almost always coming from a place I can understand.

And I don't think I'm the only one: witness more than a 1000 views of this thread already. Yes, it's a little like watching a car crash, I'll admit. Really who can look away? But there's more to it than that, for most people, I hope.

A lot of what I agree with in Yor's comments comes back to the nature of the movie-bidness itself these days. There are fine actors out there. There are fine composers. There are fine films. It's just that 99% of the movie audience will never go see them and that 99% of the movie business isn't geared to those people any more. It's geared toward 13 year olds who love explosions, noise, and cartoon characters who would be just too stupid and one dimensional to grace any self-respecting graphic novel. It's an interesting inversion: today's comic books are far more demanding of the reader's intelligence than the majority of todays comic book-based movies.

It makes you want to scream. I have no idea what a Yor scream would sound like, but I bet it makes me want to make that noise.

I'm a huge admirer of Jerry Goldsmith's soundtracks. To my mind, nobody was more brilliant. I'm in awe of anyone who has the ability to hear in their own heads music that has never been heard before, but Goldsmith also heard sounds that nobody had ever heard before, found instruments or pots and pans that made those sounds, and incorportated that into his music. Goldsmith in the 60s was genius. In the 70s he was great. In the 80s, well maybe he started to lose a litle of his spark, but look at what more and more he was being given to work with. Occasionally, he was able to twist an assignment for a truly wretched movie a little, like the Inchon score which seems a little like a parody of the horribly steriotypical 1940s/50s B films, or Congo, where he almost pulls off a Curtis Mayfield Superfly subversion of the entire movie with his music, but mostly the films he scored weren't good enough or bad enough to provide any hook into character or incident or inspiration. By the 90s, there hardly anything of worth except Trek.

I see so many movies that could have been helped with a better score. Perhaps not made watchable, but helped. Think of what Goldsmith, or Herrmann or Barry, or... well, anyone with talent could have done for The Golden Compass. Desblot's score was nothing but toneless noise, which is what he seems to specialize in. Even the New Yorker or New York Times recently reviewed one of his projects as having been torpedoed by the awful score.

Any movie that is reviewed as the year's most over-wraught, incoherent piece of psycho-sexual hysteria (the most recent Batman, a Plan 9 from Outer Space with a $100,000,000 budget) is required viewing for anyone who loves movies. But why do you have to be subjected to an aural assault while trying to defend yourself from simultaneous attacks to your eyes and brain? It is fair, I think, to believe that the producers have embraced the old saying: "It's so loud I can't even hear myself think." Exactly. Because if you could hear yourself think, you'd hear: "What a piece of crap. How do I get outta here?"

So I think Yor is making a valid point in a uniquely Yor-ish way, and it's one that I appreciate. We haven't seen The End of Film As We Know It. (Yet.) But we have seen the end of thoughtful, well-crafted film with characters and a meaningful story to tell, at least in wide release. While indie films can be quietly spectacular and beautiful, they're made with $30-40 budgets. That leaves maybe six bucks for the composer. Probably not as much as a television show might get. Goldsmith might have written 6 or 8 soundtracks in a single year in his prime. Barry or Kamen or any number of others, one or two. And they would be good!

We're never going to hear people like these again, or soundracks like these again. If for no other reason than the economics of the kind of films they did their best work for just isn't there.

To prove my point: how may people on this board have actually been excited about about a new Varese release for a current film? Compare that to how many people on this board have been excited about a La La Land or FSM or Intrada release of a soundtrack from 10, 15, even 40 (ST TOS) years ago?

A decade or two ago, I'd scan the newspaper ads for new movies every week, looking for Goldsmith's name in the super tiny print, hoping for a new score.

The last decade or so, the new soundtracks mostly make me want to scream in Yor-anguish.


 
 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2013 - 11:03 AM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)


If people on the board talked to each other in person they would have real conversations. And the few trolls that did show up at his and your events proved to be decent people who seemed to take on a different personality when they got online.


"Civilized men are more discourteous than savages because they know they can be impolite without having their skulls split, as a general thing."

--Robert E. Howard



Yes!
Substitute "internet trolls" for "civilized men" and you have made the point perfectly!
Good job!

 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2013 - 11:26 AM   
 By:   YOR The Hunter From The Future   (Member)


Yes!
Substitute "internet trolls" for "civilized men" and you have made the point perfectly!
Good job!


 
 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2013 - 11:30 AM   
 By:   facehugger   (Member)


Yes!
Substitute "internet trolls" for "civilized men" and you have made the point perfectly!
Good job!



Why not come to my home and split my skull?

Or if you can just call a moderator to ban me, or use that "ignore" button.

Hypocritical man. You sir are the incarnation of an internet *beep*, attacking forum members when none had attacked you.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2013 - 11:34 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

Instead of continuing this as a individual personal discussion, I'll try to hijack this into a film score discussion.

This is, I think, only my second post here, after lurking since... well, when the site was formed. I always look to see what Yor is up to. I find Yor highly entertaining, sometimes laugh out loud funny, and while sometimes one-note, almost always coming from a place I can understand.

And I don't think I'm the only one: witness more than a 1000 views of this thread already. Yes, it's a little like watching a car crash, I'll admit. Really who can look away? But there's more to it than that, for most people, I hope.

A lot of what I agree with in Yor's comments comes back to the nature of the movie-bidness itself these days. There are fine actors out there. There are fine composers. There are fine films. It's just that 99% of the movie audience will never go see them and that 99% of the movie business isn't geared to those people any more. It's geared toward 13 year olds who love explosions, noise, and cartoon characters who would be just too stupid and one dimensional to grace any self-respecting graphic novel. It's an interesting inversion: today's comic books are far more demanding of the reader's intelligence than the majority of todays comic book-based movies.

It makes you want to scream. I have no idea what a Yor scream would sound like, but I bet it makes me want to make that noise.

I'm a huge admirer of Jerry Goldsmith's soundtracks. To my mind, nobody was more brilliant. I'm in awe of anyone who has the ability to hear in their own heads music that has never been heard before, but Goldsmith also heard sounds that nobody had ever heard before, found instruments or pots and pans that made those sounds, and incorportated that into his music. Goldsmith in the 60s was genius. In the 70s he was great. In the 80s, well maybe he started to lose a litle of his spark, but look at what more and more he was being given to work with. Occasionally, he was able to twist an assignment for a truly wretched movie a little, like the Inchon score which seems a little like a parody of the horribly steriotypical 1940s/50s B films, or Congo, where he almost pulls off a Curtis Mayfield Superfly subversion of the entire movie with his music, but mostly the films he scored weren't good enough or bad enough to provide any hook into character or incident or inspiration. By the 90s, there hardly anything of worth except Trek.

I see so many movies that could have been helped with a better score. Perhaps not made watchable, but helped. Think of what Goldsmith, or Herrmann or Barry, or... well, anyone with talent could have done for The Golden Compass. Desblot's score was nothing but toneless noise, which is what he seems to specialize in. Even the New Yorker or New York Times recently reviewed one of his projects as having been torpedoed by the awful score.

Any movie that is reviewed as the year's most over-wraught, incoherent piece of psycho-sexual hysteria (the most recent Batman, a Plan 9 from Outer Space with a $100,000,000 budget) is required viewing for anyone who loves movies. But why do you have to be subjected to an aural assault while trying to defend yourself from simultaneous attacks to your eyes and brain? It is fair, I think, to believe that the producers have embraced the old saying: "It's so loud I can't even hear myself think." Exactly. Because if you could hear yourself think, you'd hear: "What a piece of crap. How do I get outta here?"

So I think Yor is making a valid point in a uniquely Yor-ish way, and it's one that I appreciate. We haven't seen The End of Film As We Know It. (Yet.) But we have seen the end of thoughtful, well-crafted film with characters and a meaningful story to tell, at least in wide release. While indie films can be quietly spectacular and beautiful, they're made with $30-40 budgets. That leaves maybe six bucks for the composer. Probably not as much as a television show might get. Goldsmith might have written 6 or 8 soundtracks in a single year in his prime. Barry or Kamen or any number of others, one or two. And they would be good!

We're never going to hear people like these again, or soundracks like these again. If for no other reason than the economics of the kind of films they did their best work for just isn't there.

To prove my point: how may people on this board have actually been excited about about a new Varese release for a current film? Compare that to how many people on this board have been excited about a La La Land or FSM or Intrada release of a soundtrack from 10, 15, even 40 (ST TOS) years ago?

A decade or two ago, I'd scan the newspaper ads for new movies every week, looking for Goldsmith's name in the super tiny print, hoping for a new score.

The last decade or so, the new soundtracks mostly make me want to scream in Yor-anguish.


Oh good, because I was just thinking that what this board needs is another poster who aggrandises his favourite composer by being disrespectful to others' favourites.

Welcome!

 
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