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 Posted:   Jun 18, 2013 - 4:55 PM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)

I read where a studio exec (who are always saying stupid things, if what I read is any indicator) said to a composer:

"People don't like saxophones." and went on to explain that he knew because "we tested it."

****

I had a neighbor, who was also a film student, announce to me,

"There are two kinds of film music!

First, there's The Theme. That's what you whistle when you go out of the theater.

And then there's the stuff that plays behind everything else. That's the stuff that goes [half-singing] 'doo-doo, doo-doo'."


********

What asinine things have you heard people say about film music? Or heard that someone heard?

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2013 - 5:20 PM   
 By:   pp312   (Member)

Well, how about Andre Previn's story of the MGM big wig* who, having been informed by a lackey that something he didn't like in a Main Title was a minor cord, promptly issued a directive to the music department to the effect that "From Now on there are to be no minor cords in any MGM picture." Always a hard one to top. smile

*(Was it Mayer himself?)

 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2013 - 5:26 PM   
 By:   ZapBrannigan   (Member)

There used to be a myth in circulation that went something like, "When film music does its job properly, you aren't even aware of it as music. You just feel the intended emotions." Baloney!

 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2013 - 5:27 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)



"I've never heard anything especially "inspired" in Zimmer's music."

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2013 - 5:39 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

Now here is a good thread. plenty of stupid things people have said when it comes to film music.the best way to start is the most simple way. Their watching a movie like THE GOOD THE BAD AND THE UGLY OR CONAN THE BARBARIAN ETC ETC and then at the end of the film, you ask them' What did you think of the music? and they say WHAT MUSIC?

 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2013 - 5:40 PM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

"There are two kinds of film music!

First, there's The Theme. That's what you whistle when you go out of the theater.

And then there's the stuff that plays behind everything else. That's the stuff that goes [half-singing] 'doo-doo, doo-doo'."


********


Doo-doo, doo-doo . . . wait a sec. I know that. That's the . . . uh . . . yeah, that's the signature theme for the Twilight Zone. But isn't that the Main Title and not the stuff that plays behind everything else?

Hey, Dave - your neighbour has it all ass over tit. But then, that's non-score-errs all over.

 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2013 - 5:50 PM   
 By:   Adam B.   (Member)

When someone refers to film score tracks on a CD as "songs".

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2013 - 5:55 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

Years ago before the public became better informed. OH THE MUSIC who is it, BACH , MOZART CHOPIN.In short he thought all the music on the film was old classical music.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2013 - 6:08 PM   
 By:   Bill Finn   (Member)

There used to be a myth in circulation that went something like, "When film music does its job properly, you aren't even aware of it as music. You just feel the intended emotions." Baloney!

Max Steiner had a reply to that. He said: "what good is it if you don't notice it?". I agree.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2013 - 8:40 PM   
 By:   CindyLover   (Member)

Max Steiner had a reply to that. He said: "what good is it if you don't notice it?". I agree.

Seconded. That's always baffled me.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2013 - 8:49 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

There used to be a myth in circulation that went something like, "When film music does its job properly, you aren't even aware of it as music. You just feel the intended emotions." Baloney!

I've always thought that made a lot of sense, but whatever...

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2013 - 8:53 PM   
 By:   Ludwig van   (Member)

I like David Raksin's story about a producer who said he wanted a score that was something different, something really powerful, like Berg's twelve-tone opera, Wozzeck. Later at Raksin's home, Raksin put on a recording of Wozzeck for the producer, to which the latter replied, "What's that crap you're playing?"

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2013 - 9:50 PM   
 By:   Regie   (Member)

I like David Raksin's story about a producer who said he wanted a score that was something different, something really powerful, like Berg's twelve-tone opera, Wozzeck. Later at Raksin's home, Raksin put on a recording of Wozzeck for the producer, to which the latter replied, "What's that crap you're playing?"

Priceless!!

When Arthur Freed from MGM was going to produce "On the Town" he wanted to use the music of Leonard Bernstein. Louis Mayer said (paraphrasing) 'don't use any of that classical music - it's too arty and people won't like it". It was also accused of being "too complex and operatic". Freed had to hire Comden and Green to produce new songs for the film.

BTW, thank heavens for the 'too complex and operatic" Leonard Bernstein!!! (add 'on my knees' icon!)

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 19, 2013 - 12:27 AM   
 By:   ian642002   (Member)

I like David Raksin's story about a producer who said he wanted a score that was something different, something really powerful, like Berg's twelve-tone opera, Wozzeck. Later at Raksin's home, Raksin put on a recording of Wozzeck for the producer, to which the latter replied, "What's that crap you're playing?"

Well, that's set me up for the day. Wonderful.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 19, 2013 - 4:39 AM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

That Raksin story turns up in Mark Evans' book "Soundtrack: The Music of the Movies" from 1975, although I don't think he mentions Raksin by name in that particular anectote. The book is full of Mr Evans' stories that begin "A certain producer once said...", or "A famous composer once recalled..." - so I take most of them with a pinch of salt. His outrage at the "new trends" now seems merely quaint. "What next? Electric guitars and synthesizers?"

Composers themselves often expressed similar outrage at the change which overcame Hollwood from the late-'60s onwards. The great Miklos Rozsa considered Rock and Roll as "the most God-awful noise mankind has invented since leaving the jungle".

The equally great Bronislau Kaper wrote that he responded with an astonished "What score?" when he learned that Isaac Hayes had won the Oscar in 1974 (!) for the "best original score" (!) for SHAFT. Actually, it was 1971 and SUMMER OF '42 (I think) won - although complaints about a "pop theme" winning an Oscar were soon to appear.

However, I would never call the quotes of such brilliant composers as "asinine". We have my mother-in-law for that -

My mum-in-law introduces me to elderly friends of hers as "a man of good taste, who loves the serious music used in films by people like Mantovani".

And to finish - I remember seeing SLEEPING WITH THE ENEMY with a girl (her name escapes me - I wonder why), and after it ended I mentioned that I thought it wasn't very good but that I quite liked the music. "There wasn't any music in that film", she assertained. So (for some now-forgotten reason) we actually saw the film for a second time, and when Van Morrison's "Brown Eyed Girl" was used, she turned to me and said "You were right! There IS music in this film"!

 
 Posted:   Jun 19, 2013 - 5:19 AM   
 By:   Scott M (Oldsmith)   (Member)

Coming from someone I consider a very good friend, but frustrating none the less:

"These are just instruments. Where are the words?"

Kill me.

 
 Posted:   Jun 19, 2013 - 5:22 AM   
 By:   Scott M (Oldsmith)   (Member)

There used to be a myth in circulation that went something like, "When film music does its job properly, you aren't even aware of it as music. You just feel the intended emotions." Baloney!

To be fair, we're a group of film score enthusiasts who notice the music because we're very interested in it. The average person pays no attention unless a) songs are used as score or b) the score is obtrusive. So when the average person notices an instrumental underscore, there's a reason. Mostly negative.

 
 Posted:   Jun 19, 2013 - 5:36 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

There used to be a myth in circulation that went something like, "When film music does its job properly, you aren't even aware of it as music. You just feel the intended emotions." Baloney!

To be fair, we're a group of film score enthusiasts who notice the music because we're very interested in it. The average person pays no attention unless a) songs are used as score or b) the score is obtrusive. So when the average person notices an instrumental underscore, there's a reason. Mostly negative.


I never heard anyone say the music in Jaw's or Star Wars was obtrusive at the time. Even from ppl who couldn't care less about the film score. Or even the 50's classics for that matter. To much credence given to the vocal minority. Most ppl simply don't care either way.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 19, 2013 - 5:38 AM   
 By:   Regie   (Member)

Composers themselves often expressed similar outrage at the change which overcame Hollwood from the late-'60s onwards. The great Miklos Rozsa considered Rock and Roll as "the most God-awful noise mankind has invented since leaving the jungle".

GOT TO AGREE WITH THAT. I love Marlon Brando's description of the music of the 50's:
'BABY FOOD'!!

My mum-in-law introduces me to elderly friends of hers as "a man of good taste, who loves the serious music used in films by people like Mantovani".


This is absolutely priceless!! Gotta love it. My mother played the piano at a high level and was a nurse in hospitals just after WW2. She'd play for them on the piano in the ward and would often laugh with us in the 1950's because people said to her, "Mary, play them Strausses waltzes - we love that classical music"!! Or they'd request Richard Addinsall's "Warsaw Concerto" which mother obliged them with but almost universally hated!!

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 19, 2013 - 5:42 AM   
 By:   Adam S   (Member)

There used to be a myth in circulation that went something like, "When film music does its job properly, you aren't even aware of it as music. You just feel the intended emotions." Baloney!

I've always thought that made a lot of sense, but whatever...


I also think that makes a lot of sense. Of course for us as film music fans, we tend to actively notice the music but I don't think that is the norm. The norm, if done well, is that people get immersed in the film and people experience the music without realizing they are hearing it. The best example I can think of from personal experience was seeing ET as a kid. Its only now that I realize the music was all but slapping me in the face. At the time, it was just part of the fabric of the experience. I wasn't aware of it. I think that's how it is for most people to varying degrees.

- Adam

 
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