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 Posted:   Apr 8, 2015 - 2:02 PM   
 By:   Francis   (Member)

Frankenstein meets the Wolfman (1943)

Fifth in the Frankenstein series and the first sequel to Wolfman, I found it worked better as a sequel to the Wolfman; The first half focuses on the aftermath of the Wolfman, with him being released from his grave and committed to a hospital of which he breaks free at night to cause havoc. The second half has him on a quest for Frankenstein in hopes of ridding him of his curse. The continuity in regards to what happened in previous movies to Frankenstein's monster is disregarded in this one. Though I read that initially they wanted the monster of Frankenstein to be blind and speak as to continue the events in Ghost of Frankenstein, but this was changed afterwards and it leaves for some odd sequences as a result. There is a finale where both monsters go at it. Though not a well written movie, I still liked this one for the continuation of the Wolfman story.

Creature of the Black Lagoon (1954)

Saw this on the beamer projected in 3D and was very impressed with how every shot is setup to get the most out of the format with some nice camera movement and objects jumping out from the screen. The underwater footage is stunning and so is the above water footage; I probably will see it again because I wasn't paying as much attention to dialogue as I was to the gorgeous shots, backdrops and lead girl which again looked stunning. The tele-lens effect with the 3D is still very cool and this movie has more 3D depth than a lot of recent 3D movies I've seen. Maybe because of the added dimension, the scares are more in your face as well and unlike the other horror icons I've seen, this one actually has lots of scary scenes. Though the monster is over exposed and not as scary when seen in full, its claw, both as a specimen and living is very intimidating. The music was interesting as well; apparently temp-tracked with earlier scores, 3 composers were brought in and it provides a good score. Though I will say the theme for the creature is used too much and becomes repetitive. Even in its early appearances, it feels over scored and I wish the music would be used more subtle. The underwater battle with the two divers and the creature has the best music. Creature is definitely a highlight out of these monster movies for me and I will check out the other 3D movies by the director. So much to see. big grin

 
 Posted:   May 17, 2015 - 6:43 AM   
 By:   Francis   (Member)

The Mummy (1959)

I didn't care for the original 30s Mummy, it had an ok opening scene but the rest of the movie felt like second rate Dracula. This '59 version starring Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee has an actual mummy complete with aged rags, played by Gandalf himself. Though he does look more like a golem here and he is being controlled similarly by an Egyptian who wants revenge on the archeologists who desecrated the mummy's tomb by opening it. This setup is actually ok and certainly better than the original, but the majority of the movie wastes inordinate amount of time with dull exposition and flashback scenes (all using the same set) between the few times the mummy strikes. The action picks up with Peter Cushing realizing he is the last victim, but far too late for my taste and I found the whole thing badly written with key players introduced far too late. The one aspect I liked was the score, with a great main title by Franz Reizenstein.

 
 Posted:   May 17, 2015 - 1:53 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

my fave bit in that greg was whenever robert culp parked his car he casually popped a brown paper bag over the parking meter that said Out of order on it and walked off!!

Bill: That was a great bit. Even better that the paper bag actually had another use later on in the film. smile

Greg Espinoza


enuf already!

 
 Posted:   May 20, 2015 - 12:14 PM   
 By:   Francis   (Member)

House of Frankenstein (1944)

Sequel to Frankenstein meets The Wolfman (1943), this one features Dracula, the Wolfman, the Frankenstein monster and a crazy scientist and his hunchback assistant returning to the Frankenstein house; The first act focuses on Dracula, the second on the Wolfman and the final one on Frankenstein; once again the Wolfman provides the best scenes though the Dracula material early on was interesting as well. With its short running time, good sets and matte paintings, the movie flies by with just the right amount of every character and a decent body count. Enjoyed this one a lot more than I did the first encounter between the Wolfman and the Frankenstein monster. The music is very effective with the great Wolfman theme recurring and being used plenty throughout.

 
 Posted:   May 20, 2015 - 2:09 PM   
 By:   Francis   (Member)

Curse of Frankenstein (1957)

Peter Cushing plays Frankenstein who becomes obsessed with of course creating his monster. This Hammer version -apparently their first stab at doing horror- is too heavy on the dialogue. It also manages to take the elements of the original (the laboratory experiment, the creation of life, the stealing of the body and brain, …) and render them totally unexciting. Especially the relationship between Frankenstein and his assistant here; No Fritz or Igor, instead we get a boring guy named Paul who starts out as Frankenstein's tutor at an early age (actually a good premise), but that storyline is abandoned quickly and they just argue for most of the film as Frankenstein's goes more insane. Only when Christopher Lee is brought to life as the monster, the movie briefly resembles what you could call a horror movie, before resorting back to boring soap opera territory. The women are also totally underwritten… I'll give the sequel a chance but safe to say I didn't like this take on the story at all.

 
 
 Posted:   May 20, 2015 - 11:03 PM   
 By:   Christopher Kinsinger   (Member)

"Sequel to Frankenstein meets The Wolfman (1943), this one features Dracula, the Wolfman, the Frankenstein monster and a crazy scientist and his hunchback assistant returning to the Frankenstein house;"

Francis…HELLOOOO, FRANCIS!!!

The crazy scientist is played by BORIS KARLOFF!!!
AND his "hunchback assistant" is played by J. CARROL NAISH!!!

OHMYGOSH, what a cast this film has!

JOHN CARRADINE
LON CHANEY, JR.
ANNE GWYNNE
LIONEL ATWILL
GEORGE ZUCCO
ELENA VERDUGO
and
GLENN STRANGE

 
 Posted:   May 21, 2015 - 12:17 AM   
 By:   Francis   (Member)

"Sequel to Frankenstein meets The Wolfman (1943), this one features Dracula, the Wolfman, the Frankenstein monster and a crazy scientist and his hunchback assistant returning to the Frankenstein house;"

Francis…HELLOOOO, FRANCIS!!!

The crazy scientist is played by BORIS KARLOFF!!!
AND his "hunchback assistant" is played by J. CARROL NAISH!!!

OHMYGOSH, what a cast this film has!

JOHN CARRADINE
LON CHANEY, JR.
ANNE GWYNNE
LIONEL ATWILL
GEORGE ZUCCO
ELENA VERDUGO
and
GLENN STRANGE


Yeah, I forgot to mention the great cast and this was actually a multiple monster movie that was a joy to watch! Definitely as good as the original movies of the respectable monsters.

 
 Posted:   May 23, 2015 - 1:15 AM   
 By:   Francis   (Member)

The Invisible Man (1933)

A scientist finds a way of becoming invisible, but in doing so, he becomes murderously insane. Highly enjoyable movie with a good mix of comedy and terror. The special effects are a mixed bag. Seeing it in HD some of the wiring is obviously visible for the practical special effects, and those removing the actor in post suffer from the lack of what should be visible behind him. Something later remedied in "Hollow Man", and that had a similar (absurd) turn to insanity as well. Despite the dated effects "Invisible Man" still impresses visually as well with its script (by H.G. Wells) involving lots of media to organize a nationwide manhunt and having the invisible man taking pleasure out of his mayhem; I felt given his body count (which at one point involves derailing an entire train for the fun of it), he is still treated remarkably polite by others and it doesn't help either he has the dumbest police force looking for him. Held up quite nicely for a movie from 1933.

 
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