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 Posted:   Jul 25, 2012 - 3:54 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

This composer's work has been used in many films, so I'm putting this topic here. smile

Okay kids, I've become obsessed with the music of Erik Satie. My crash course has been the Gnossiennes, Gymnopédies (and Debussy's orchestrations of same), as well as the score for the ballet, PARADE. I'm open to any and all suggestions for preferred renditions of his work and all the (hopefully) fun and informative discussion we can have about this artist.

My first exposure to Satie was in 1992, during my obsession for singer-songwriter Tim Buckley, who was influenced by Satie's music. For years he was just a name, and then I heard Gymnopédie No. 1 in the opening credits of Woody Allen's film, Another Woman. That's when I decided to get things rolling and I have not been disappointed.

Satie's music changes with whatever mood I'm in. Sometimes I hear great sadness, like in Gymnopedie No. 3, but then there's an uplifting quality, too. It's all emotions, shadings, and colors. I don't have to be in a specific mood to enjoy Erik Satie's music. I love the "silence between the notes" heard in his compositions, the "unfussy" technique, and the richness of those Debussy orchestrations. The humor of PARADE is wonderful.

So what else of his music do I seek out?

 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2012 - 4:36 PM   
 By:   Jerry Horne   (Member)

Does anyone happen to know which recording of Gymnopedies was used in the opening credits of Ken Russell's 'Salome's Last Dance'?

 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2012 - 6:35 PM   
 By:   ToneRow   (Member)

For years he was just a name, and then I heard Gymnopédie No. 1 in the opening credits of Woody Allen's film, Another Woman. That's when I decided to get things rolling and I have not been disappointed.


That may or may not be the same Satie piano piece that Louis Malle used in his 1963 film LE FEU FOLLET (THE FIRE WITHIN).



To be honest, though, what I've heard of Satie's music doesn't resonate with me so I never explored further any of Satie's oeuvre.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2012 - 11:01 PM   
 By:   TerraEpon   (Member)

Interestingly, Satie wrote something of a film score
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entr%27acte_%28film%29
Pretty interesting, though quite repetitive music (the aritcle goes into a bit about why)
Apparently he also had the first ever cameo in that.


 
 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2012 - 11:50 PM   
 By:   Alex Klein   (Member)

Good thread, Jim. Satie's music has been greatly overlooked and deserves much more attention, from both musicians and music-lovers alike.
I strongly recommend you get Klara Körmendi's recording (on Naxos) of Satie's Nocturnes (six in total). They are some of the most beautiful and mysterious piano works I have ever heard in my life. Their use of harmony by fourths and open fifths is uniquely melancholic, bleak and yet comforting (if you excuse my subjective analysis).
Listen to these Nocturnes and let me know what you think!

If you want some of his lighter musical voice, listen to "La Diva de L'Empire", "Piccadilly" and "La Belle Excentrique". Of course, this list would not be complete without his classic "Je te veux". These works are light, completely charming and offer striking contrast to the darker Gnosiennes and the melancholic Gymnopedies and Nocturnes. Similar to the aforementioned is his famous "Three pieces in the shape of a pear" (the name is in french), which are a delightful listen.

Finally, most musicologists agree that Satie's masterpiece is his symphonic drama "Socrate". This is Satie at his most serious and dramatic. The work is completely essential for any Satie enthusiast. Needless to say, you should seek it (EMI released it on vinyl and CD, but could be hard to find).

Happy listening!

Alex

 
 Posted:   Jul 26, 2012 - 4:38 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Muchas gracias por todo, Alex. This will definitely be of use to me. I appreciate you taking the time (and everyone else, too). smile

 
 Posted:   Jul 26, 2012 - 6:42 AM   
 By:   lexedo   (Member)

I have a nice set of Satie's works by Claire Chevalier. You can grab interpretations by just about anyone. Legrand has his take of Satie on apex. Here is the Chevalier CD:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B001DETDDC?in=1&is=300&qid=1343280609&sr=8-6

The interesting thing about Satie is that his works served as an influence to the "ambient" music of William Orbit, whose music was used in 4-5 different spots of the 1995 movie Heat, as well as other "ambient" artists. 

Perhaps the first, or one of the first, films Satie scored was a silent documentary, "Haiti." It may even be him playing, but I don't recall, not having seen the documentary in a few years. (I did a post about this, but I cannot find it.)

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 26, 2012 - 8:39 AM   
 By:   Alex Klein   (Member)

Muchas gracias por todo, Alex. This will definitely be of use to me. I appreciate you taking the time (and everyone else, too). smile

De nada. ¡Que lo disfrutes!

Alex

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 26, 2012 - 9:11 AM   
 By:   roy phillippe   (Member)

This composer's work has been used in many films, so I'm putting this topic here. smile

Okay kids, I've become obsessed with the music of Erik Satie. My crash course has been the Gnossiennes, Gymnopédies (and Debussy's orchestrations of same), as well as the score for the ballet, PARADE. I'm open to any and all suggestions for preferred renditions of his work and all the (hopefully) fun and informative discussion we can have about this artist.

My first exposure to Satie was in 1992, during my obsession for singer-songwriter Tim Buckley, who was influenced by Satie's music. For years he was just a name, and then I heard Gymnopédie No. 1 in the opening credits of Woody Allen's film, Another Woman. That's when I decided to get things rolling and I have not been disappointed.

Satie's music changes with whatever mood I'm in. Sometimes I hear great sadness, like in Gymnopedie No. 3, but then there's an uplifting quality, too. It's all emotions, shadings, and colors. I don't have to be in a specific mood to enjoy Erik Satie's music. I love the "silence between the notes" heard in his compositions, the "unfussy" technique, and the richness of those Debussy orchestrations. The humor of PARADE is wonderful.

So what else of his music do I seek out?


There is an excellent recording of Satie's piano works, "Erik Satie by Michel Legrand" on Erato.
Legrand has 2 other outstanding solo piano discs, "Four Piano Blues" also on Erato, and "American Piano Music" on the apex label.

 
 Posted:   Jul 26, 2012 - 3:07 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

There is an excellent recording of Satie's piano works, "Erik Satie by Michel Legrand" on Erato. Legrand has 2 other outstanding solo piano discs, "Four Piano Blues" also on Erato, and "American Piano Music" on the apex label.

Thanks for the recommendation.

One of the things I found myself getting frustrated with in my on-again/off-again interest in Classical music is finding the "best" performance. With Satie, I'm finding that too many pianists are overly reverential and play the pieces too slow, at least to my liking. Just as we film music mavens desire the original recordings, whereas the classical aficionado, not able to be bound by that hang up, must instead fixate themselves on the "right" tempo. Enjoying music can be a neurotic past time...not that anyone here is that way, of course wink

Gymnopedie No. 3 and Gnossienne No 5 are my favorites thus far. Still exploring various versions...

 
 Posted:   Jul 29, 2012 - 2:51 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I'm quite taken with Danses de Travers, as well. I get the feeling that they'll pull me in deeper the more I hear them. There's an obsessive quality about Satie's work. It's driven; something I hear after getting past the surface prettiness found in much of his music.

So far I prefer Satie as heard in solo piano. It's so unadorned and stripped bare of sentiment and flowery affectation. Even the Debussy arrangements have this on occasion, as much as I like those.

 
 Posted:   Jul 29, 2012 - 4:51 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Speaking of Danses de Travers, No. 1 sounds like something Thomas Newman would later use for...well most of his scores, but Road to Perdition in particular.

 
 Posted:   Jul 29, 2012 - 2:00 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Has anyone ever seen PARADE, the ballet which features Satie's music? Has it even been on tour anywhere in recent years?

 
 Posted:   Aug 6, 2013 - 7:33 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

If you want some of his lighter musical voice, listen to "La Diva de L'Empire", "Piccadilly" and "La Belle Excentrique". Of course, this list would not be complete without his classic "Je te veux". These works are light, completely charming and offer striking contrast to the darker Gnosiennes and the melancholic Gymnopedies and Nocturnes. Similar to the aforementioned is his famous "Three pieces in the shape of a pear" (the name is in french), which are a delightful listen.

Alex


Listening to Trois morceaux en forme de poire and yes, quite light and refreshing after having heard so many of Satie's darker, more intense works.

I loved the Nocturnes though I do have to be "armored up" to listen to them! A bit on the demanding side. I love the Danses Gothiques, too.

 
 Posted:   Aug 6, 2013 - 7:37 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Has anyone picked up this 10-CD set of Satie's piano works? It was released back in May of this year.

http://www.amzn.com/B00004VR4S/

 
 Posted:   Aug 23, 2013 - 12:24 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

interesting and offbeat documentary on Erik Satie:

"The Precursor"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rCacoDnHGe4

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VSt-afR9v9U

 
 Posted:   Feb 21, 2014 - 3:16 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

LOVE the Ogives, Vexations, Danses Gothiques, Nocturnes, and Sarabandes, too.

 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2014 - 10:53 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

The absolutely glorious and gorgeous "Air du Grand Prieur." I wish more film scores adopted/adapted the Satie Sound.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UurQgmVJ7Xk

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2014 - 2:53 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

I love Satie. I discovered him because of Bernard Herrmann, whose version of two of the Gymnopedies was my introduction. I was hooked and still am.

 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2014 - 5:01 PM   
 By:   JohnnyG   (Member)

All you Satie lovers, at least one of these three albums - especially the first one - must be in your collections:








 
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