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 Posted:   Jan 7, 2012 - 4:19 AM   
 By:   Ken G   (Member)

Last year I picked up these two:

"Fumo di Londra" (1997 2 CD set Avanz Records, Japan)
"Playgirl '70" (2010 Verita Note, Japan)



and today I bought:

"Ti ho sposato per allegria" (2010 Verita Note, Japan)



This is Now Playing and I'm enjoying it a lot...

Can anyone recommend any other albums by Piero similar to the above? Or indeed by others - Armando, Ennio etc. Thanks for your help!

[Please excuse my ignorance. Although I am a huge music fan - mainly jazz and soul - it's only in the past couple of years I've started getting into OSTs - these make up a small percentage of my collection compared with other genres.]

 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2012 - 4:51 AM   
 By:   ToneRow   (Member)

Welcome to the world of Piero Piccioni!

Piccioni has composed music of different moods for various film genres from the late 1950s, throughout the 1960s & '70s.

The few titles you highlight above are some of his "lounge"-style albums from the late '60s.

If you wish to explore earlier and later years, but still remain within the overall jazzy realm, I'd recommend:

ADUA E LE COMPAGNE (1960)



THE TENTH VICTIM (1965)



SCACCO ALLA REGINA (1969)



I'm not very keen on the soundtracks for those Alberto Sordi comedies, but this one stands out in my opinion just to hear Piccioni himself singing scat with a female vocalist:

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2012 - 5:09 AM   
 By:   Ken G   (Member)

Welcome to the world of Piero Piccioni!

Thanks, ToneRow! wink

I've taken a note of those titles you recommend and will definitely be on the look out for them - thanks!


 
 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2012 - 5:17 AM   
 By:   JimWynorski   (Member)

If you can find them, try THE WITCHES(from Digitmovies) and SARTANA - two of his best in my opinion.

 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2012 - 5:32 AM   
 By:   wayoutwest   (Member)

Excellent
You are in for some good times

More later I'm just passing through...

Check out the samples for some of the CAM cds
http://www.camscores.com/site/index.php?site=ost&path=artist&idartist=164

Especially:
SENILITA'
UN TENTATIVO SENTIMENTALE

 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2012 - 5:55 AM   
 By:   ToneRow   (Member)

If you can find them, try THE WITCHES(from Digitmovies)...

Hey, Ken G, THE WITCHES was written in 1966 and is known for its "shake" as its main theme.
The Italian title is LE STREGHE:



(catch her if you can!) smile

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2012 - 6:56 AM   
 By:   Ken G   (Member)

Thanks for these recommendations, everybody!

I'll keep my eyes peeled for these. Some of them seem to be OOP/expensive, but it's always good to have things to be on the lookout for!

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2012 - 7:05 AM   
 By:   Ken G   (Member)

If you can find them, try THE WITCHES(from Digitmovies) and SARTANA - two of his best in my opinion.

Off topic, but I ordered "Chi Sei?" [Franco Micalizzi] from Digitmovies just the other day. My first CD from that label...

Looking forward to hearing it; I watched and kinda "enjoyed" the movie recently.

 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2012 - 7:32 AM   
 By:   Loren   (Member)

anything available

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2012 - 8:27 AM   
 By:   mortenbond   (Member)

PUPPET ON A CHAIN is his absolute masterpiece!!!!!!! His only score for an English film, if I am not mistaken.

 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2012 - 9:08 AM   
 By:   ToneRow   (Member)

Glad you're diggin' our suggestions;
we'll keep in mind not to suggest any further out-of-print rarities.

Are you willing, Ken G, to sample the multi-faceted dramatic scoring of Piccioni besides his jazzy music?
If so, then I hope you don't mind my further ramblings about Piccioni (since he's my favorite Italian composer).

Piccioni's late 1950s scores (from what little there is available on disc) sound customary for the era, not unlike "Golden Age" Hollywood. If one likes the soundtracks of Hugo Friedhofer, for example, then early Piccioni may not disappoint. People crossing-over from Jazz and Soul might consider an early Piccioni score (such as 1957's LA DONNA CHE VENNE DEL MARE) too old school for them.

1960 was the first "peak" year for Piccioni, in my opinion, and this phase of blending big band jazz/cocktail lounge instrumentals & songs with orchestral underscoring (typically melancholy in character) continued through 1963 or so:

IL BELL'ANTONIO (1960)

Bittersweet themes, evocative of humiliation just as much as provincial gossip. If ones likes the music of Alex North, one should give this disc a try.

L'IMPREVISTO (1961)

Henry Mancini-type jazzy source music for half; the other half suspense dissonance, at times resembling Leonard Rosenman

HANDS OVER THE CITY (1963), plus others

A new release and very important, too. Piccioni's collaborations with director Francesco Rosi spanned decades (similar to A. Sordi), and yield a significant body of soundtracks. With this album, we get early experimental Piccioni. Lots of darkly hued sustained chords and even electronics from 3 films.

From about the time Piccioni scored CONTEMPT/LES MEPRIS/IL DISPREZZO for Jean-Luc Godard (who favored the Georges Delerue version), Piccioni's music took on lighter tones and more pop-flavored directions throughout the remainder of the 1960s, with much use of organ.

Nevertheless, Piccioni continued to write dramatic scores concurrent with his blossoming presence in the lounge music area. Piccioni gave us an early Euro-Western with MINNESOTA CLAY by '65, the fanciful MORE THAN A MIRACLE in '67, a year which brings forth another favorite Piccioni of mine:

LO STRANIERO (1967)

Introspective, reflective & minimalistic musical sounds, which pulsate hypnotically, offer the listener a sense of solitude quite rare as far as music albums go.

Piccioni began to receive more diverse assignments.

Adult erotica with CAMILLE 2000.
Eastern mysticism & ethnic Indian instruments merged with pop sensibilities in 1970's CIAO GULLIVER:


A heady potpourri of love themes, giallo dissonances, party music sources, classical adagios, plus beguiling vocals sung by Shawn Robinson await you in 1971's LA VOLPE DALLA CODA DI VELLUTO:

This is one I think you'd like, Ken G, if for only the ladies' vocals (which are bewitching)!

Indeed, you could select any Piccioni soundtrack title from 1971 blindfolded and emerge with a satisfying winner.

The year 1971 is another peak for Piccioni, and many of my personal favorites come from this year (like THE LIGHT AT THE EDGE OF THE WORLD and THE DESERTER) ...


The 1972 adaptation of THE MONK is the closest to horror music on disc by Piccioni:


Piccioni was right there at the start of the mid-'70s nunsploitation sub-genre with his 1973 STORY OF A CLOISTERED NUN:


There's Russian classics adapted for Italian TV:


A 1974 police thriller:


...and Piccioni rounded off the decade in Renaissance mode with Sordi's 1979 version of Moliere(!) IL MALATO IMMAGINARIO:

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2012 - 9:28 AM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

and thats a list without Wayoutwest's recommendations yet....

be ready for a bucket load of titles!

Masterful organ work (as you will hear in such masterpieces as Puppet on a chain, as Mortenbond recommends above).

Wayoutwest once described Piccioni's western scores as the "gentle westerns". Quite accurate.


I agree with Tonerow, The Deserter is great and still available

Also try these other westerns
Il Gustiziere Di Rio (nice whistling and gentle guitar!)
In Nome Del Padre, Del Figlio, e Della Colt (In the name of the father, son and the colt) (nice gentle trumpet)
Minnesota Clay (as per Tonerow's recommendation above)
Io Non perduno Uccido (wonderful oomba brass and trumpet, but gentle!)
Una Colt in Mano Al Diavolo (nice bass and gentle guitar)

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2012 - 9:41 AM   
 By:   Ken G   (Member)

Wow! You guys are spoiling me - any most likely bankrupting me!

Thanks for those suggestions from the earlier period, ToneRow - they definitely appeal too.

And Nunploitaion? Now there's a sub-genre that I didn't know existed!

I've just thought that a better question might be: "Which ones by Piero should I avoid?" Ha!

 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2012 - 10:32 AM   
 By:   wayoutwest   (Member)

ToneRow Has already covered many gems
Sorry to mention some more OOP titles but think it is good to know which ones are amongst the very best

My favorite Alberto Sordi score
Bello, Onesto, Emigrato Australia Sposerebbe Compaesana Illibata

Piccioni drops the pace way down it so mellow that you’ll find yourself suspended in a heavenly place

Really enjoyed all the Verita titles two of my favorites

Just Sublime


Extreme isolation the rhythms give such a sense of depth multidimensional
Not for everyone


One amazing track after another wave after wave of organ grooves wash out over you you’ll be soaring high one of my all time favourites.


 
 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2012 - 10:55 AM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)

Last year I picked up these two:

"Fumo di Londra" (1997 2 CD set Avanz Records, Japan)
"Playgirl '70" (2010 Verita Note, Japan)

and today I bought:

"Ti ho sposato per allegria" (2010 Verita Note, Japan)


I've been collecting works by Maestro Piccioni for a number of years and now have 29 scores (albeit some are only 3 or 4 tracks) by him; notwithstanding approx. twice as much by John Williams and more than four times as much by Jerry Goldsmith I now find I much prefer the works of this brilliant Italian composer.

My exposure to his films is very limited so I can't say that I think his scoring was first class ... but the music he produced is usually very welcoming and pleasing. Not everything works ... I'm not so taken with his Western scores (though Minnesota Clay does have a superb theme ... the track Tumble Weed is brilliant!)

I'm only guessing the sounds of the three albums you have (I'm envious ... each is usally too pricey for me, even when you can find them) but his lounge style is best shown (in my collection) in scores such as Adua e le Compagne, Le Bell'Antonio, L' Imprevisto, Peccato Mortale (No encontré rosas para mi madre) and Appassionata, the first being an absolute favourite of mine.

In a different style, but very highly recommended is Le Monache di Sant'Arcangelo.

Mitch

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2012 - 11:35 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

PUPPET ON A CHAIN is his absolute masterpiece!!!!!!! His only score for an English film, if I am not mistaken.

1971's "The Light at the Edge of the World" and "The Deserter" were both English-language films.

And let's not forget 1969's "Kenner," which FSM released along with "More than a Miracle."

 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2012 - 11:47 AM   
 By:   ToneRow   (Member)

I've just thought that a better question might be: "Which ones by Piero should I avoid?" Ha!

Indeed!

And that's a much tougher question, too.

Hhmmm ... there's a number of Piero's albums I've purchased solely because his name was on them and I may have listened to them once or twice, and they now sit on a shelf.
As I implied above, these are from Alberto Sordi comedies which, even though they seem to have been very popular in Italy, don't appeal to me personally.

But just because I tend to avoid them doesn't mean they won't yield pleasure to others.

Tell you what, though, there is one CD to avoid more so due to how Piero's music was treated.
I'm referring to GDM/Legend's CD of THE MAN WHO LAUGHS, which is reallly a Carlo Savina album.
Piero wrote music for L'UOMO CHE RIDE which was rejected.
This music is culled together in a 12-minute suite on the last track of the CD, and it sounds poorly preserved.
It is so densely orchestrated that, in suite format, it sounds a mess.
It might have been a better listen if sequenced differently, or maybe the music just simply wasn't on target conceptually.

Also, I'm disappointed with Piccioni's TEMPEST from 1958. It sounds older than '58, but, more to the point, it doesn't sound like the Piero we've come to know and love.

 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2012 - 11:48 AM   
 By:   wayoutwest   (Member)

It is very hard for me to decide on just a few when there are so many that I love many of them have already been mentioned by everyone.

Mitch the Verita cds are not overly pricey if you buy them from Ark Square in Japan the postage was only something like $4 when I ordered two titles from them in December to the UK think the discs worked out about £20 each which is not much more than a hillside title.
http://www.arksquare.net/index_main.html

Peccato Mortale (No encontré rosas para mi madre) never seems to get mentioned it is very good indeed.

 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2012 - 11:54 AM   
 By:   ToneRow   (Member)

PUPPET ON A CHAIN is his absolute masterpiece!!!!!!! His only score for an English film, if I am not mistaken.

1971's "The Light at the Edge of the World" and "The Deserter" were both English-language films.

And let's not forget 1969's "Kenner," which FSM released along with "More than a Miracle."


True.

There's 4 of them in English, mentioned above, plus a few others dubbed into English like "The Tenth Victim" & "Minnesota Clay".

However, I think "Puppet On A Chain" was the only British production to have a Piccioni score.
It was conducted in England by Harry Rabinowitz (I don't know if Piccioni himself ever left Italy for that score ... ? ...)

 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2012 - 12:24 PM   
 By:   wayoutwest   (Member)

Was not too sure about The Tempest at first myself the sound quality is extremely bad on some of the tracks which is of putting in itself I was quite enjoying a number of the tracks the last time I listened to that one it's more in the Peplum vein it was conducted by Franco Ferrara who also conducted for a number of others Rustichelli, Carlo Innocenzi...

One title I used to hate but discovered last time I listened to it there was a number of tracks that where quite enjoyable.


This one is not to exciting but there is still some very good tracks on it
Scusi, Lei È Favorevole O Contrario?

 
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