Film Score Monthly
FSM HOME MESSAGE BOARD FSM CDs FSM ONLINE RESOURCES FUN STUFF ABOUT US  SEARCH FSM   
Search Terms: 
Search Within:   search tips 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
 
This is a comments thread about FSM CD: Some Came Running
 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2011 - 5:26 PM   
 By:   GoblinScore   (Member)

Another win from FSM and a Bernstein score that doesn't get much talk I see.....

So, Lukas, did this win the award for biggest pain in the arse to produce
or what? Glad you went to the trouble, but really....a blank channel, having
to mix and match from different elements,etc?
I love when you guys share
behind the scenes production notes, like this one in the liners. This main
title ostinato piano theme is ridiculously addictive, and another memorable
love theme too.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2011 - 5:51 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

Yes a fine underrated score by Elmer, beautiful love theme and as you said a very attractive main theme one does not forget.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 8, 2012 - 11:56 AM   
 By:   Dorian   (Member)

Why not just bump this thread to boast publicly that I absolutely and totally love this score! In the last few days I was in the exact mood for it so I've been spinning again both the Cloud Nine and the FSM CDs endlessly. Such a great music, so powerful and so fresh, yet written some 50 years ago...

Anyone unfamiliar with this score should really check it out. Start with sampling tracks 1 and 16!

FSM's promotion article says it best: "this is one of Bernstein's—and the era's—very best."

 
 Posted:   Nov 8, 2012 - 4:25 PM   
 By:   Dirk Wickenden   (Member)

I had the CLoud Nine CD release of the score and jumped immediately when FSM released this complete edition - a lot of work and well worth the effort on their part.

I bought the DVD when it was released a few years ago, having seen it on TV years before but more importantly, having also seen it in a screening at the National Film Theatre in London, in which Elmer sat in on and participated in a talk afterwards with Cynthia 'bright red tights' Millar. The film was very, very powerful on the big screen and Elmer was surprised when most of the audience laughed at the scene where a nun nursed Dean Martin's Bama in hospital after his diabetes diagnosis and didn't know if it was due to her flirtacious behaviour or her nurses hat.

It was part of an Elmer Odyssey, as we chatted at the NFT on the Saturday, then interviewed him on the Monday for Soundtrack magazine (along with three other film music journalists from other publications/websites) and finally attended his eightieth birthday concert at the Albert Hall a couple days after that, where he was whisked away at the end by Michael Aspel, for his surprise This Is Your Life recording.

Elmer commented when he watched the film at the NFT, when the opening titles started he said to himself 'sonofagun, that's Bernard Herrmann!' in terms of the tone of the cue - which he'd never really thought about before. I zeroed in on one aspect of the score, the cue underscoring Dave Hirsh's (Frank Sinatra) settling into his hotel room, underscored by the bluesy saxophone and then being interrupted by a classical violin as the camera focuses on the classic literature books he pulls from his kitbag. Elmer wanted to help illustrate the 'other side' of Dave's persona.

Funny story, at the end of the interview, I said to Elmer 'I'm not envious of your talent or your wealth - but you've got FORTY YEARS on me and you have more HAIR than I do!'. Then, standing alongside him for a photo, I looked over and said 'Well, at least I'm taller than you' and he replied 'EVERYone's taller than me!'.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 9, 2012 - 10:12 AM   
 By:   Dorian   (Member)

Thank you, Dirk, for your post and for the amusing story with Elmer. I will have to check the film out!

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 9, 2012 - 10:49 AM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)

I can't say it's my favourite score by Mr. Bernstein but it's not too far down that list ...

... wonderful main title (so powerful!) and fabulous melodies throughtout. And it interpolates one of the best melodies composed by Jimmy Van Heusen (lyrics: Sammy Cahn): To Love and Be Loved

I don't always jump at the release of a score but this one was quickly on my shopping list - highly recommended!

I haven't seen the film for many years ... I kept meaning to watch it when we had TCM and now we don't I may have to buy the DVD frown

Mitch

 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
© 2014 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved.