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 Posted:   Mar 16, 2011 - 12:37 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Among my most-desired films I wish to own on DVD is Steven Soderbergh's KAFKA. I've only seen it once, upon first release twenty years ago. I loved the imagery and atmosphere this film has and Cliff Martinez contributed a fine score, as well. I know I'd appreciate this movie more now than I did as a twenty-year-old back in 1991. If any company releases this film to dvd, I hope it's Criterion. I'd pay their exorbitant price in a second. wink

http://criterioncast.com/2010/05/19/steven-soderbergh-working-on-directors-cut-of-1991-film-kafka-is-a-criterion-release-inevitable/

 
 Posted:   Mar 16, 2011 - 12:40 PM   
 By:   Francis   (Member)

I've seen this on bbc a long time ago, it made an impression. I agree about a dvd/blu-ray release, I'd get this.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 16, 2011 - 12:44 PM   
 By:   JMC   (Member)

This is one of my favorite movies ever and I, too, really want this on DVD. A few years ago ran into Steven Soderbergh at the NY Film Festival and I asked him when it would come out on DVD. He said he was in the process of re-editing it. Ugh. I actually told him to leave it alone. Not sure he appreciated me telling him that. But this was almost five years ago and still no DVD, theatrical version or his re-edited version. Hopefully someday. I own the VHS tape but I don't even have a VHS player anymore. Oh well. Great score, too!

 
 Posted:   Mar 16, 2011 - 12:46 PM   
 By:   Francis   (Member)

He said he was in the process of re-editing it. Ugh. I actually told him to leave it alone. Not sure he appreciated me telling him that.

LOL. That's a gutsy thing to say. Did you ever meet George Lucas? wink

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 16, 2011 - 1:34 PM   
 By:   JMC   (Member)

He said he was in the process of re-editing it. Ugh. I actually told him to leave it alone. Not sure he appreciated me telling him that.

LOL. That's a gutsy thing to say. Did you ever meet George Lucas? wink


I know. I felt pretty bad about it afterwards. Although that was my immediate reaction to him telling me that. I would like to see what he would do with a re-edit. Maybe it would be even better. It could use some fleshing out I suppose.

It's funny this film was brought up since I was just thinking about it recently after seeing The Adjustment Bureau. The finale of that film reminded me a bit of the finale to Kafka.

 
 Posted:   Mar 16, 2011 - 1:59 PM   
 By:   scorechaser   (Member)

There is a german dvd avaiable with english sound.

http://www.amazon.de/Kafka-Jeremy-Irons/dp/B00028XMN2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1300309162&sr=8-1

One of my favorite movies too.

 
 Posted:   Mar 16, 2011 - 3:24 PM   
 By:   ToneRow   (Member)

Soderbergh's KAFKA is one of the best pictures from the 1990s, IMO, and it resides on my favorites list.

If one likes this KAFKA, then I strongly recommend watching the 1962 adaption of Kafka's THE TRIAL, directed by Orson Welles. The monochrome photography in KAFKA was no doubt inspired by Orson Welles' masterly usage of black-and-white in THE TRIAL, which possesses dream-like surrealism via sequences full of chiaroscuro. THE TRIAL is "top 10" cinema with me, and KAFKA follows suite not too far away...

 
 Posted:   Mar 17, 2011 - 11:54 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Soderbergh's KAFKA is one of the best pictures from the 1990s, IMO, and it resides on my favorites list.

If one likes this KAFKA, then I strongly recommend watching the 1962 adaption of Kafka's THE TRIAL, directed by Orson Welles. The monochrome photography in KAFKA was no doubt inspired by Orson Welles' masterly usage of black-and-white in THE TRIAL, which possesses dream-like surrealism via sequences full of chiaroscuro. THE TRIAL is "top 10" cinema with me, and KAFKA follows suite not too far away...


Glad to know there are a few others here who appreciate this film!

I avoided THE TRIAL because I couldn't believe Anthony Perkins in such a role; go figure. However, I must have been under a dark cloud that day, so I will seek the film out based solely on your recommendation. smile

 
 Posted:   Mar 18, 2011 - 12:26 AM   
 By:   ToneRow   (Member)

Soderbergh's KAFKA is one of the best pictures from the 1990s, IMO, and it resides on my favorites list.

If one likes this KAFKA, then I strongly recommend watching the 1962 adaption of Kafka's THE TRIAL, directed by Orson Welles. The monochrome photography in KAFKA was no doubt inspired by Orson Welles' masterly usage of black-and-white in THE TRIAL, which possesses dream-like surrealism via sequences full of chiaroscuro. THE TRIAL is "top 10" cinema with me, and KAFKA follows suite not too far away...


Glad to know there are a few others here who appreciate this film!

I avoided THE TRIAL because I couldn't believe Anthony Perkins in such a role; go figure. However, I must have been under a dark cloud that day, so I will seek the film out based solely on your recommendation. smile


If you have anti-Anthony Perkins tendencies, that's your perogative.
I believe even Francois Truffaut critized the casting within Welles' THE TRIAL - Truffaut thought the cast should be all Eastern Europeans to convince the audience they were Czech characters.
I disagree with this, because the whole point of being "Kafkaesque" is to be in a nameless country with unidentified authorities dominating you with red-tape bureaucracy and oppressing you into submission and unfounded guilt.
Orson Welles captures this nightmarish environment very well, I think.

Besides, even if you prefer not to accept Anthony Perkins, there's Romy Schneider and Elsa Martinelli in the cast. I hope you won't object to them! smile

 
 Posted:   Mar 18, 2011 - 2:58 AM   
 By:   Jehannum   (Member)

I disagree with this, because the whole point of being "Kafkaesque" is to be in a nameless country with unidentified authorities dominating you with red-tape bureaucracy and oppressing you into submission and unfounded guilt.
Orson Welles captures this nightmarish environment very well, I think.


Actually, there's an alternative, highly convincing interpretation of what Kafka's books were about.

The guilt is real, or at least believed to be real by the self, subconsciously. Every persecution is a manifestation of an internal struggle.

I'm pretty confident Kafka's subject is not Orwellian / totalitarian oppression but the torment from within the 'soul', and is much more interesting as a result.

I thoroughly recommend anyone interested in Kafka to read Kafka's Trial: The Case Against Josef K. by Eric Marson.

 
 Posted:   Mar 18, 2011 - 3:12 AM   
 By:   ToneRow   (Member)


Actually, there's an alternative, highly convincing interpretation of what Kafka's books were about.

The guilt is real, or at least believed to be real by the self, subconsciously. Every persecution is a manifestation of an internal struggle.

I'm pretty confident Kafka's subject is not Orwellian / totalitarian oppression but the torment from within the 'soul', and is much more interesting as a result.

I thoroughly recommend anyone interested in Kafka to read Kafka's Trial: The Case Against Josef K. by Eric Marson.


True, THE TRIAL is a mixture of Kafka and Welles.
The bed-ridden Welles character even asks: "We can't be all guilty,...can we?"
But Joseph K's character's did not do anything (to the reader's/viewer's knowledge) which should trigger off his internal feelings of guilt; other more dominant personalities seem to instill guilt into passive individuals (in the film, anyway).

I agree the internal aspect is very interesting, but to communicate in the first person perspective is more difficult to maintain in cinema, wherein interactions and conflicts between multiple characters creates the (melo)drama.

 
 Posted:   Mar 18, 2011 - 3:55 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

If you have anti-Anthony Perkins tendencies, that's your perogative.
I believe even Francois Truffaut critized the casting within Welles' THE TRIAL - Truffaut thought the cast should be all Eastern Europeans to convince the audience they were Czech characters.

I disagree with this, because the whole point of being "Kafkaesque" is to be in a nameless country with unidentified authorities dominating you with red-tape bureaucracy and oppressing you into submission and unfounded guilt.

Orson Welles captures this nightmarish environment very well, I think.


Keep in mind my dismissal of Perkins was *several* years ago. I like him fine, I just thought he was "too American" for such a role.

I just got through watching Woody Allen's Shadows & Fog. While primarily a comedy, does away with the "Fauxreign accents" altogether. It does adhere to the "nameless country" aspect of Kafka, and I also see nods to The Third Man.

 
 Posted:   Mar 19, 2011 - 7:11 PM   
 By:   Dr. Nigel Channing   (Member)

I also remember seeing this on the big screen. As I recall, the production design was spectacular, but the story fell a little flat. It would be nice to give it another look.

 
 Posted:   Mar 20, 2011 - 12:10 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

It's now my single-most desired dvd request, even topping Farewell, My Lovely. Let's hope Criterion or some such enterprising company sees that KAFKA gets a release.

In the meantime, I'll be watching The Third man and Shadows 7 Fog, as well as immersing myself in Franz Kafka's writings.

 
 Posted:   Mar 20, 2011 - 1:12 PM   
 By:   ToneRow   (Member)

It's now my single-most desired dvd request, even topping Farewell, My Lovely. Let's hope Criterion or some such enterprising company sees that KAFKA gets a release.

In the meantime, I'll be watching The Third man and Shadows 7 Fog, as well as immersing myself in Franz Kafka's writings.


There was a region 1 release of KAFKA on VHS tape from Paramount in the '90s, but the DVD of KAFKA that is out there is on region 2 (so it is available in different ways).
Do you own a code-free/region-free DVD player?

When you watch THE THIRD MAN, see if you can determine how much the direction is by Carol Reed and how much of it is Orson Welles!
SHADOWS AND FOG is a nice treat (one of the few Woody Allen films I got on home video). Allen's SHADOWS AND FOG is a wider homage to Germanic Expressionism than only Kafka; Fritz Lang is evoked, plus there's a circus environment probably in deference to the silent VARIETY.

Also, are you aware that Kino issued on DVD an adaption of Kafka's THE CASTLE, directed by Michael Haneke?

 
 Posted:   Jan 2, 2013 - 12:00 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

KAFKA in its entirety on youtube. Watch it while you can. Still waiting on the (Criterion?) DVD:

 
 Posted:   Mar 20, 2013 - 8:55 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

A Steven Soderbergh interview, which includes a bit on KAFKA:

"Well, I’m remaking—it’s been a long process—but I’m overhauling Kafka completely. It’s funny—wrapping a movie 22 years later! But the rights had reverted back to me and Paul Rassam, an executive producer, and he said, “I know you were never really happy with it. Do you want to go back in and play around?” We shot some inserts while we were doing Side Effects. I’m also dubbing the whole thing into German so the accent issue goes away. And Lem and I have been working on recalibrating some of the dialogue and the storytelling. So it’s a completely different movie. The idea is to put them both out on disc. But for the most part, I’m a believer in your first impulse being the right one. And I certainly think that most of the seventies directors who have gone back in and tinkered with their movies have made them worse."

http://www.vulture.com/2013/01/steven-soderbergh-in-conversation.html

 
 Posted:   Jul 3, 2013 - 7:20 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Google doodle commemorates the 130th birthday of Franz Kafka...except for those of you in the United Kingdom, that is:




http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2013/jul/03/franz-kafka-metamorphosis-google-doodle

Now please get the Criterion edition of Soderbergh's film out...please?

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 3, 2013 - 8:30 AM   
 By:   Montana Dave   (Member)

Possible Spoilers:
I saw this film when I lived in Seattle and went the first weekend it opened. I've never thought too much about it in the years since however there is an element in the film that was, (for me), the stuff of nightmares in it's effectiveness to frighten. I'm not sure where in the film it took place, but there's a scene in an old elevator going down to ground level. I think Jeremy Irons is in it and being pursued by a raving lunatic (with a knife?). But it was the shrieking and truly disturbing maniacal laughing that the lunatic made as he pursued the desperate Jeremy Irons that has made the deep impression on me, all these years later.

 
 Posted:   Aug 27, 2013 - 5:43 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Jeremy Irons on The Tonight Show in 1992 to promote KAFKA:

 
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