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 Posted:   Apr 4, 2011 - 10:57 AM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

Hey guys I'm new to the forum and want to start right away:
Marvellous release from Kritzerland!!! A great Newman. It sounds so fresh and lush. Can't stop listening to it. There should be more music released from Good Ol' Al!

I watched the film yesterday and noticed that the main tiltle says that Edward B. Powell was in charge of the orchestrations on Counterfeit Traitor.

That's odd because the CD's liner notes state that orchestrations were done by Leo Shuken and Jack Hayes who worked predominently with Newman in the 60s. Powell worked with Newman at Fox until 1959. In the liner notes from FSM's 'The Best of Everything' Lukas wrote: "For whatever reason [...] Newman and Powell had a falling-out following Newman's penultimate film at Fox, 'The Diary of Anne Frank' (1959). Except for portions of Paramount's 1961 musical, 'The Pleasure of His Company', the two would not work together again."

So why did Paramount chose to give Powell the credit instead of Shuken and Hayes?


Welcome to the board! I have no idea why Powell would be credited on the film itself - the orchestrator information came directly from the AFM and the session reports and Powell's name was nowhere to be seen.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 7, 2011 - 6:38 AM   
 By:   Pete Apruzzese   (Member)

I just want to thank Bruce for bringing this film to my attention with his CD release of the score. I received a Netflix rental of it yesterday and watched it for the first time last night - what a great, great movie. Truly white-knuckle suspense and intelligent plotting. A terrific sense of time and place and ambiguous morals. Holden is just fantastic, as is the rest of the cast. The turning point at the halfway mark is genuinely wrenching. Can't praise the film enough. As for Alfred Newman's score, it's also terrific. I will definitely be picking this one up (as soon as I know how our taxes turn out), hope it's still around for another couple of weeks.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 11, 2011 - 5:30 PM   
 By:   joec   (Member)

Got this today. What a great release! Up there with ONE EYED JACKS as one of my favoites. And both from Kritzerland! This is an excellent score and should not be missed.

 
 Posted:   Apr 11, 2011 - 6:01 PM   
 By:   Gary S.   (Member)

Got this today. What a great release! Up there with ONE EYED JACKS as one of my favoites. And both from Kritzerland! This is an excellent score and should not be missed.

A great release. Everyone should own a copy of this score...well ok...maybe not everyone...maybe anyone who has thought about sampling a Newman score. I already know the guy wrote wonderous music so I ordered it right away.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 17, 2011 - 11:42 AM   
 By:   Panavision70   (Member)

My copy arrived in Saturday's mail. Beautiful score, wonderful stereo sound. This is very much a companion piece to Newman's "Anastasia." Marianna's theme is very close in mood to the Anastasia theme.

It is amazing the treasures you are able unearth.

Thank you!

 
 Posted:   Jun 11, 2011 - 8:09 PM   
 By:   Steve Johnson   (Member)

I finally picked this up belatedly and as I listen, I am as ever haunted by that melancholy waltz theme that runs throughout. It's just a terrific score from a fine, sadly overlooked movie.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2013 - 9:39 AM   
 By:   skyross   (Member)

I have finally managed to get hold of a copy of this film on DVD. What a great Movie, I have never seen it before and what a great score from ALFRED NEWMAN. I bought the Kritzerland CD when it first came out over 2 years ago.

It's a shame that there is not more interest in classic scores like this.

Keep up the good work Kritzerland.

Any Alfred Newman is an instant buy for me.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2013 - 11:08 AM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)

I have finally managed to get hold of a copy of this film on DVD. What a great Movie, I have never seen it before and what a great score from ALFRED NEWMAN. I bought the Kritzerland CD when it first came out over 2 years ago.

It's a shame that there is not more interest in classic scores like this.

Keep up the good work Kritzerland.

Any Alfred Newman is an instant buy for me.




I quite agree. A wonderful Alfred Newman score. Any Alfred Newman is a must-buy for me too.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2013 - 11:21 AM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

The apathy shown this score was actually shocking to me - it's quite brilliant. Had we done our standard 1000 it would have been gone in a few months, I'm sure. Doing 1500 was a huge mistake. It's not a disaster by any means - we've probably sold 1200 in the two years, but still, you'd like to think that a classic Newman score from the 1960s would sell as well as a classic Newman score from the 1940s or 1950s.

I think a lot of it has to do with the fact that few have seen the film - something else I don't really understand, since the film is great and readily available to watch via streaming.

 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2013 - 12:14 PM   
 By:   gsteven   (Member)

Thrilling prelude (rhythmic, driving, and percussive with a near-Herrmannesque quality), one Newman's best "love themes" heard in various guises (waltz, romanza and heartrending anguish for Marianna's fate), tense action music, warm and hopeful folk themes for the last scenes; there is so much to enjoy in this score...as others have remarked, it is almost a "sister" score to THE DIARY OF ANNE FRANK.

 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2013 - 12:46 PM   
 By:   Yavar Moradi   (Member)

What he said. AWESOME score. I too will buy pretty much any Alfred Newman that gets put out, but this one in particular is one of his best scores. Since it was a 60s title in great sound I expected it to sell out fast.

Yavar

 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2013 - 12:49 PM   
 By:   Zoragoth   (Member)

The apathy shown this score was actually shocking to me - it's quite brilliant. Had we done our standard 1000 it would have been gone in a few months, I'm sure. Doing 1500 was a huge mistake. It's not a disaster by any means - we've probably sold 1200 in the two years, but still, you'd like to think that a classic Newman score from the 1960s would sell as well as a classic Newman score from the 1940s or 1950s.

I think a lot of it has to do with the fact that few have seen the film - something else I don't really understand, since the film is great and readily available to watch via streaming.


It's a fine film and a wonderful score - I sought the film out on DVD because of your fine release, Bruce, and I thank you for putting it out, not only for the wonderful music, but also for drawing attention to this excellent film I had not heard of previously!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2013 - 3:07 PM   
 By:   manderley   (Member)

I saw this film in the 1960s and was totally involved in it. I was at a party around that time and was able to talk to George Seaton about it, and thank him for his directorial work. Seaton was a wonderful, thoughtful man, a fine writer-director, and at that time at least, one of the best directors in the business. I always tried to see the newest Perlberg-Seaton film, and was rarely, if ever, disappointed.

Without question, the score is impeccable and is one of my late favorites of Mr. Newman. I am so thrilled to have this CD in my collection, complete and in stereo.

I have had the film on DVD for quite some years now too, just as I had the Laserdisc, but for some emotional reason I find that I am unable to watch it again. I sometimes take it down off the shelf, look at the cover, remember the fine film within, and then put it back on the shelf.

I think now, at my age, the overbearing drama and suspense on view is too intense for me, the situations too real, and the thoughts of my own mortality keep me from viewing it.

This now happens to me on more than one film in my collection---ones that I know and remember fondly and well. I just can't bring myself to watch them again because of the overpowering emotions they will stir up. Just remembering them seems enough of an experience. The underlying cruelty and horrors of man-against-man above-and-below the surface of the visual goings-on emotionally do me in. THE DIARY OF ANNE FRANK, a superb film, is another of these. I keep them all in my collection, with the hope that one day I might be at peace with watching them again. Meanwhile, I remember them at their best.

I wonder if any of you have had the same feelings about films you have seen in the past.

 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2013 - 10:14 PM   
 By:   ajhfsm   (Member)

My favourite of Kritzerland's Alfred Newman releases, I haven't seen the film, I don't know exactly what scenes the music accompanies, however I do know that I enjoy the music for it's intrinsic strength.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2013 - 10:25 PM   
 By:   TheFamousEccles   (Member)

I saw this film in the 1960s and was totally involved in it. I was at a party around that time and was able to talk to George Seaton about it, and thank him for his directorial work. Seaton was a wonderful, thoughtful man, a fine writer-director, and at that time at least, one of the best directors in the business. I always tried to see the newest Perlberg-Seaton film, and was rarely, if ever, disappointed.

Without question, the score is impeccable and is one of my late favorites of Mr. Newman. I am so thrilled to have this CD in my collection, complete and in stereo.

I have had the film on DVD for quite some years now too, just as I had the Laserdisc, but for some emotional reason I find that I am unable to watch it again. I sometimes take it down off the shelf, look at the cover, remember the fine film within, and then put it back on the shelf.

I think now, at my age, the overbearing drama and suspense on view is too intense for me, the situations too real, and the thoughts of my own mortality keep me from viewing it.

This now happens to me on more than one film in my collection---ones that I know and remember fondly and well. I just can't bring myself to watch them again because of the overpowering emotions they will stir up. Just remembering them seems enough of an experience. The underlying cruelty and horrors of man-against-man above-and-below the surface of the visual goings-on emotionally do me in. THE DIARY OF ANNE FRANK, a superb film, is another of these. I keep them all in my collection, with the hope that one day I might be at peace with watching them again. Meanwhile, I remember them at their best.

I wonder if any of you have had the same feelings about films you have seen in the past.


Similar to you, there are certain films I am reluctant to revisit, not necessarily because of content, but because of the context in which I first saw them, and where I was as a person. Some films, if you see them at the right time, (and this is true of all art, really) can really hit you between the eyes, and create an emotional response that seems non-replicable. So strong is that feeling and the association between them and the film, that I'm reticent to rewatch them, because I am not the person I once was, and there's a chance my feelings will differ or not be as strong, and I prefer (sometimes) to recall the film as I experienced it in that moment, and not have reality and gradual objectivity potentially shatter my view of a movie.

I too picked this album up very quickly - in fact, I sent an email to Kritzerland on day one asking to hold a copy until later that night - so sure was I that it would be a one-day sell-out. If you don't have it in your collection though, pick it up - it's Newman at his most thrilling and really evokes the place and characterization in a typically strong, smart way. "Marianna" is a gorgeous theme well worth revisiting.

 
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