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 Posted:   Jul 15, 2010 - 5:53 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Recently I've rediscovered the numerous comic strip clippings of The Phantom that I've had from the early '80s and up to 1985-86. Lee Falk was one prolific mutha! He makes Milton Caniff (another comic strip hero of mine) look like J.D. Salinger!

I hadn't thought about the strip in years--decades even--but it has turned out to be a neglected chapter in my love of pulp/adventure/comic strips. I vividly remember setting the newspaper on the living room floor and reading The Phantom every day during my childhood. The Sundays were great because they had a separate adventure often with more on the history of previous Phantoms. I've always loved the tradition of the Phantom, with 21 generations taking up the mantle. The strip had a mythology all its own: I love the Skull Cave, the ring that leaves its permanent mark on its victims, the layout of the Phantom's "Deep Woods" locale, often with beautifully-rendered layouts by artist Sy Barry, whose art always had a crisp, clean, easy-to-see quality.

Ghost Who Walks, baby.

Although I like how each story keeps new readers informed as to The Phantom's origin:

"I swear to devote my life to destroy injustice, piracy, and greed--my sons and their sons will follow me!"

Can't help but get a chuckle out of that. I can hear the Phantom's son responding in a Jeff Spicolli-style voice:

"Gee, thanks dad!"
-----------------------------

It was also interesting to note that The Phantom is wildly popular in Norway and Australia, where there are reprintings of the strip in an ongoing comic book.

Here's a great site with lots of Phantom info:

http://www.ipcomics.net/classics-index/strips.php?list=D001

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2010 - 9:10 PM   
 By:   Odlicno   (Member)

I loved The Phantom when i first started collecting comics when i was 12. I collected Mark Verheinden and Luke McDonnell's 12 part series in 1990ish. It was great.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 19, 2010 - 7:49 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

The Phantom is indeed HUGE here in Norway (bigger than its country of origin even) and I'm a longtime fan. At least I used to be when I was a kid and teen. I have hundreds upon hundreds of different comic books, my favourite artist being Hans Lindahl, even more than the original Lee Falk strip. Oh, and I disliked the movie version with Billy Zane. Paid no respect to the original creation. The new SyFy TV film looks pretty bad too.

 
 Posted:   Jan 31, 2018 - 10:54 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

The Phantom's popularity in Norway stems from the character's relevance dueing World War II:

"During World War II, Falk joined the Office of War Information, where he became chief of his radio foreign language division. Moore also served in the war, during which he left the strip to his assistant Wilson McCoy. On Moore's return, he worked on the strip on and off until 1949, when McCoy succeeded him. During McCoy's tenure, the strip appeared in thousands of newspapers worldwide, and The Phantom strip was smuggled by boats into the Nazi-occupied Norway during World War II. The word "Phantom "was also used as a password for the Norwegian Resistance, leading the character to receive iconic status in the country."

http://waneytech.wikia.com/wiki/The_Phantom

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 2, 2018 - 2:30 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

I didn't know that. Makes sense.

The Phantom comic books remain one of the most important cultural products in my life; having shaped a number of directions in my life.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 2, 2018 - 5:44 AM   
 By:   michael469   (Member)

I read the Phantom comic strip books back in the 60s. That was in NZ. It was pretty big there and of course, in Oz (as mentioned).

My main comic book collecting was with the Gold Key comic books, mainly for the painted covers and the artists (Manning and Gioletti for example). So Magnus Robot Fighter, Turok Son of Stone, Tarzan adaptations, Space family Robinson, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea and, of course, The Phantom.

 
 Posted:   Feb 2, 2018 - 12:11 PM   
 By:   LeHah   (Member)

I've always loved The Phantom - yes, the Billy Zane movie is terrific - and even own a copy of the 1946 Son Of The Phantom novel that I found pitched into a goodwill bin some years back. I don't even think I paid a dollar for it.

 
 Posted:   Feb 2, 2018 - 12:37 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Zeta sultry hotness.


 
 
 Posted:   Feb 2, 2018 - 12:46 PM   
 By:   ANZALDIMAN   (Member)

Thumbs up for the David Newman score as well.

 
 Posted:   Feb 2, 2018 - 12:48 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Thumbs up for the David Newman score as well.

Big thumbs up!

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 2, 2018 - 1:14 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

The film is ridiculously bad, and -- as I said when this thread was first created -- betrays a lot of what the original comics were about (and especially Lindahl's version of The Phantom). I just don't think Americans got this as well as we Norwegians did. But yeah -- it's David Newman's best score ever!

 
 Posted:   Feb 2, 2018 - 1:40 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

The film is ridiculously bad, and -- as I said when this thread was first created -- betrays a lot of what the original comics were about (and especially Lindahl's version of The Phantom). I just don't think Americans got this as well as we Norwegians did. But yeah -- it's David Newman's best score ever!

Yeah, the film itself is cringe worthy.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 2, 2018 - 1:50 PM   
 By:   ANZALDIMAN   (Member)

Thumbs up for the David Newman score as well.

Big thumbs up!


Indeed.

The score was the best thing about that film. That, and a young Catherine Zeta-Jones.

 
 Posted:   Feb 2, 2018 - 7:52 PM   
 By:   Mr. Jack   (Member)


The score was the best thing about that film. That, and a young Catherine Zeta-Jones.


Yes to both. cool



The movie itself? I barely remember it, but what I do was cheesy and corny as hell (and not in any sort of charming way).

 
 Posted:   Feb 3, 2018 - 4:15 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

My interest is primarily with the Lee Falk-Sy Barry comic strip. A publisher is currently reprinting the Phantom Sundays and dailies in hardcover books and they are somewhere in the early 1950s. The volumes are pricey, but I will jump on board whenever they get to 1962 and the Sy Barry artwork era.

https://www.amzn.com/1613451199

Don Newton, one of my favorite Batman artists, also drew The Phantom for Charlton Comics in the 1970s. I have yet to look into those.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 3, 2018 - 4:54 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

The Falk/Barry strips are classics, of course, but I find myself drawn more towards the darker, lusher aspects in later years, like the aforementioned Lindahl, Knut Westad and -- to a lesser extent -- Jaime Valvée.

This is especially evident in "Fantomet-krønikene" (the Phantom Chronicles), about various earlier incarnations.

 
 Posted:   Feb 3, 2018 - 11:39 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

The Falk/Barry strips are classics, of course, but I find myself drawn more towards the darker, lusher aspects in later years, like the aforementioned Lindahl, Knut Westad and -- to a lesser extent -- Jaime Valvée.

This is especially evident in "Fantomet-krønikene" (the Phantom Chronicles), about various earlier incarnations.


One of the things I like about the Falk stories in the attention given to previous generations of Phantoms. The extensive backstory and history allowed for an even richer adventure. I've not explored those stories you've mentioned, as I still have decades of earlier Falk stuff to read. However, a shortlist of recommended stories is most welcome.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 3, 2018 - 2:53 PM   
 By:   spiderich   (Member)

My interest is primarily with the Lee Falk-Sy Barry comic strip. A publisher is currently reprinting the Phantom Sundays and dailies in hardcover books and they are somewhere in the early 1950s. The volumes are pricey, but I will jump on board whenever they get to 1962 and the Sy Barry artwork era.

https://www.amzn.com/1613451199

Don Newton, one of my favorite Batman artists, also drew The Phantom for Charlton Comics in the 1970s. I have yet to look into those.


Don't forget Jim Aparo:

https://www.amazon.com/Aparos-Complete-Phantom-Dick-Wood/dp/1613451105

Richard G.

 
 Posted:   Feb 6, 2018 - 6:24 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Don't forget Jim Aparo:

https://www.amazon.com/Aparos-Complete-Phantom-Dick-Wood/dp/1613451105

Richard G.


I learn something every day! Thanks for posting that.

 
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