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 Posted:   Jun 21, 2010 - 8:12 PM   
 By:   Montana Dave   (Member)

The very first soundtrack of Georges Delerue's I can recall purchasing (after 'Interlude') was his 1969 'Anne of the Thousand Days'. It was a vinyl album put out by Decca (I think), and I recall it as being a marvelous listen. I think half the album was of court dances and the other half was score, but it had just a fraction of the score that was in the film. This score delivered to Delerue his very first Academy Award Nomination for Best Original Score - he lost to....Burt Bacharach.
Now that the Universal Vaults have opened up somewhat, is there a possibility that this wonderful period score might be released? Any members here recall the film with the powerful Richard Burton and the marvelous Genievieve Bujold who as Anne Boleyn more than matched his King Henry VIII? For the newbies who've never heard of this film, (nor heard of Richard Burton or Genievieve Bujold) I offer this 10 minute sample of the film's opening credits. The fanfare is quite nice! If you haven't seen the film yet, turn off the clip after the opening credits have ceased.




 
 
 Posted:   Jun 21, 2010 - 8:45 PM   
 By:   TerraEpon   (Member)

People have been wanting this for a while. For whatever reason, it was hoped it'd be paired with a Barry score (I forget which) on CD that Intrada released by itself.

IIRC, the LP is quite short, like 26 minutes. Hopefully any release would have something else with it. A shame it can't be paired with Rich and Famous. Stupid licensing rules...

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 21, 2010 - 9:12 PM   
 By:   Michael Arlidge   (Member)

For whatever reason, it was hoped it'd be paired with a Barry score (I forget which) on CD that Intrada released by itself.

Probably "Mary Queen of Scots". The Intrada release of that score ran a very short 28 minutes. Could "Anne of the Thousand Days" have fit on the remaining space of the disc? Pairing them would have made sense, because the films share a common director (not to mention costume designer, Margaret Furse, who won an Oscar for 'Thousand Days', and was nominated for 'Mary').

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 21, 2010 - 11:28 PM   
 By:   TerraEpon   (Member)

Yeah, it was Mary. it seemed to be a pretty common request to pair those two.

Acording the Soundtrack Collector, the LP was actually 35 minutes:
http://www.soundtrackcollector.com/catalog/soundtrackdetail.php?movieid=21663
Which isn't so bad. But a lot of it's authentic Renaissance music....

But it looks like there's an ISO score of 50 minutes....hopefully any release of this will be full stereo as I really want this score, at least based on the track from the Delerue box...

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2010 - 12:45 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Yeah, it was Mary. it seemed to be a pretty common request to pair those two.

Acording the Soundtrack Collector, the LP was actually 35 minutes:
http://www.soundtrackcollector.com/catalog/soundtrackdetail.php?movieid=21663
Which isn't so bad. But a lot of it's authentic Renaissance music....

But it looks like there's an ISO score of 50 minutes....hopefully any release of this will be full stereo as I really want this score, at least based on the track from the Delerue box...

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Universal paired "Anne" and "Mary" for DVD release, so it's hard to understand why it couldn't be done for CD purposes. The DVD isolated score is actually for "Mary" and not for "Anne." Since the CD release for "Mary" was of the LP program and not the full score, it's probably a fair bet that the stereo tracks for "Mary" could not be found. And since we don't even have an isolated mono score for "Anne" on the DVD, the likelihood of finding those actual tracks is also in doubt. Perhaps it has something to do with the fact that the films were produced (and the scores probably were recorded) in Britain.

The LP for "Anne" has only about 19 minutes of actual score, with side 2 taken up by period music not used in the film. (One short piece is actually composed by Henry VIII himself.)

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2010 - 12:52 AM   
 By:   Michael Arlidge   (Member)

But it looks like there's an ISO score of 50 minutes....hopefully any release of this will be full stereo as I really want this score, at least based on the track from the Delerue box...

If the score is at least 50 minutes in duration (taking into account the fact that there may be unused material not heard on the DVD isolated score track, or indeed the film itself), then it would be perfectly justified to release it on its own.

Why do I have a bad feeling there are legalities getting in the way here?frown

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2010 - 1:02 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

But it looks like there's an ISO score of 50 minutes....hopefully any release of this will be full stereo as I really want this score, at least based on the track from the Delerue box...

If the score is at least 50 minutes in duration (taking into account the fact that there may be unused material not heard on the DVD isolated score track, or indeed the film itself), then it would be perfectly justified to release it on its own.

Why do I have a bad feeling there are legalities getting in the way here?frown



There is no isolated score for "Anne of the Thousand Days," only for "Mary, Queen of Scots."

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2010 - 1:26 AM   
 By:   Michael Arlidge   (Member)

There is no isolated score for "Anne of the Thousand Days," only for "Mary, Queen of Scots."

Ah, my mistake. Whichever source TerraEpon was referring to then.smile

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2010 - 1:27 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

There is no isolated score for "Anne of the Thousand Days," only for "Mary, Queen of Scots."

Ah, my mistake. Whichever source TerraEpon was referring to then.smile


Actually, TerraEpon made the error. The listing on SoundtrackCollector is confusing.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2010 - 1:39 AM   
 By:   Michael Arlidge   (Member)

Actually, TerraEpon made the error. The listing on SoundtrackCollector is confusing.

Well in that case we're stuffed!big grin

Seriously though, the film is showing on cable here at some point in the near future, so I'll make sure to do a tally of the number of minutes of music (Delerue score and otherwise).

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2010 - 1:45 AM   
 By:   manderley   (Member)

.....One short piece is actually composed by Henry VIII himself.....


Are his performance royalties overseen by ASCAP or BMI, Bob? smile

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2010 - 1:56 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

.....One short piece is actually composed by Henry VIII himself.....

Are his performance royalties overseen by ASCAP or BMI, Bob? smile


Public Domain, I'm afraid. Just as well. The royalties would probably have to be shared with the estates of his six wives. frown

The P.D. selections on the album were apparently cheap filler, in place of more expensive score cuts. They were performed by The New York Pro Musica, which at the time recorded exclusively for Decca Records.

 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2010 - 5:35 AM   
 By:   Maleficio   (Member)

These are Delerue score tracks on the LP:

1. Overture (03:55)
2. Court Airs and Dances (04:20)
3. Lute Song (01:32)
4. Farewell My Love (02:06)
5. Fanfare And Dances For Henry VIII (03:40)
6. Execution And Epilogue (03:13)

About 19 minutes of Delerue music on the LP.

I have the film on hand but I haven't brought myself to watch it yet. But skimming through the film, there is definitely more music especially actual dramatic film score. The music on the LP is just music for set pieces and source music.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2010 - 6:21 AM   
 By:   TerraEpon   (Member)

The P.D. selections on the album were apparently cheap filler, in place of more expensive score cuts. They were performed by The New York Pro Musica, which at the time recorded exclusively for Decca Records.

Were they in the movie, or was it simply a case of "it's easiest to put these pieces on the LP"? Were they newly recorded, or taken from a commercial recording?

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2010 - 12:06 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

The P.D. selections on the album were apparently cheap filler, in place of more expensive score cuts. They were performed by The New York Pro Musica, which at the time recorded exclusively for Decca Records.

Were they in the movie, or was it simply a case of "it's easiest to put these pieces on the LP"? Were they newly recorded, or taken from a commercial recording?


The pieces by the New York Pro Musica were taken from prior LP releases by the group, some from a 1962 album ("Instrumental Music from the Courts of Queen Elizabeth and King James" - Decca DL 79415) and others from a 1968 album ("The Kynge's Musicke" - Decca DL 79434). To the best of my knowledge, the selections did not appear in the film.

 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2010 - 12:17 PM   
 By:   johnjohnson   (Member)

Yeah, it was Mary. it seemed to be a pretty common request to pair those two.

Acording the Soundtrack Collector, the LP was actually 35 minutes:
http://www.soundtrackcollector.com/catalog/soundtrackdetail.php?movieid=21663
Which isn't so bad. But a lot of it's authentic Renaissance music....

But it looks like there's an ISO score of 50 minutes....hopefully any release of this will be full stereo as I really want this score, at least based on the track from the Delerue box...

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Universal paired "Anne" and "Mary" for DVD release, so it's hard to understand why it couldn't be done for CD purposes. The DVD isolated score is actually for "Mary" and not for "Anne." Since the CD release for "Mary" was of the LP program and not the full score, it's probably a fair bet that the stereo tracks for "Mary" could not be found. And since we don't even have an isolated mono score for "Anne" on the DVD, the likelihood of finding those actual tracks is also in doubt. Perhaps it has something to do with the fact that the films were produced (and the scores probably were recorded) in Britain.

The LP for "Anne" has only about 19 minutes of actual score, with side 2 taken up by period music not used in the film. (One short piece is actually composed by Henry VIII himself.)



Perhaps Tadlow could look into releasing this score, or maybe even a re-recording.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2010 - 4:35 PM   
 By:   Montana Dave   (Member)

TADLOW? A very good idea Psicorpsranger since the studios don't seem to want to realease anything after all this time.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2010 - 5:26 PM   
 By:   greylocke5   (Member)

For whatever reason, it was hoped it'd be paired with a Barry score (I forget which) on CD that Intrada released by itself.

Probably "Mary Queen of Scots". The Intrada release of that score ran a very short 28 minutes. Could "Anne of the Thousand Days" have fit on the remaining space of the disc? Pairing them would have made sense, because the films share a common director (not to mention costume designer, Margaret Furse, who won an Oscar for 'Thousand Days', and was nominated for 'Mary').


I don't know how much music score there is, but I think another logical pairing would be Delerue's score for A Man For All Seasons. It precedes the score for Anne by about three years and is also in a renaissance style. The soundtrack LP was largely dialogue, if I remember correctly, so there might be very little original score.

Anyone know more about this?

 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2010 - 5:32 PM   
 By:   Maleficio   (Member)



Anyone know more about this?


These films are from two totally different production companies so that is not likely.

 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2010 - 5:35 PM   
 By:   Maleficio   (Member)

Could this be the score Taylor White, of percepto, was referring to:

Believe me, Maleficio, there are several stunning Delerue releases in the works, including one import of an American film release that I promise will knock everyone's socks off. A definitely 'Holy Grail' score where tapes were rumored to be lost for decades, but have since been found and sound excellent.

As if there aren't enough releases to keep everyone busy and broke now!


Though I hope it's referring to HOUSE ON CARROLL STREET since the tapes are rumored to be lost.

 
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