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 Posted:   Nov 20, 2009 - 11:47 AM   
 By:   IntoTheVoid   (Member)

Lukas,

I was wondering if you could give us all a little behind-the-scenes description of what all is involved in your work of negotiating with studios / companies to secure the rights to republish soundtracks?

Let's say for example, Star Trek II.

 
 Posted:   Nov 20, 2009 - 12:30 PM   
 By:   Lukas Kendall   (Member)


Oh my. Do I have to? It's kinda proprietary stuff. I hope you understand. Sorry to disappoint.

Lukas

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 20, 2009 - 12:33 PM   
 By:   IntoTheVoid   (Member)

Oh my. Do I have to? It's kinda proprietary stuff. I hope you understand. Sorry to disappoint.

Lukas


No problem.

I was just sort of wondering how long it takes from start to end or does it depend on the project?

 
 Posted:   Nov 20, 2009 - 12:51 PM   
 By:   dogplant   (Member)

I was just sort of wondering how long it takes from start to end or does it depend on the project?

Doctor, the online liner notes for FSM's "The Omega Man 2.0" might give you some insights into the kind of magic that Lukas gets up to behind the scenes. Quite an entertaining read (as well as a fab score):

http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/notes/omega_man.html

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 20, 2009 - 12:55 PM   
 By:   IntoTheVoid   (Member)

Thanks!

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 20, 2009 - 4:46 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

Thanks!

None of us will give away any secrets, I can assure you. But sometimes it can happen very quickly, i.e. our Taras Bulba where, from the initial suggestion on this board, to my deciding to do it, make the deal, get the tapes, do the remastering and prepare the booklet took all of four weeks. Some things take a lot longer to do many factors, some of which have to do with the various studios, some of which have to do with how many CDs the label has in the pipeline. All I'll say is it can be easy as pie and it can be filled with annoyances - I prefer the former to the latter, frankly.

 
 Posted:   Nov 20, 2009 - 6:57 PM   
 By:   Lukas Kendall   (Member)


Well...we started "Madame Bovary" for the Rozsa box in 2004, I think!

Lukas

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 20, 2009 - 7:39 PM   
 By:   MMM   (Member)

I had a project I wanted to do in 1995. Originally wanted to do a re-recording, but there were no scores to be found anywhere. When I considered doing a release of the original tracks, I was up against the same situation -- no tapes existed either. No leads where anything might be. Nothing. About five years ago I inherited a huge collection of unidentified and unidentifiable reel-to-reel tapes from a film music library that went under, and they were just stored in my closet, and whenever I got a little time free I transferred one to digital. Still no sign of the score I was looking for as I scoured archives around the country where it might be located. Two years ago I'm transferring one of the tapes, and all of a sudden blaring from my speakers I hear the very music I've been searching for all these years! The entire soundtrack was there -- every last stitch of music, including music not used in the film, and it'll be released in early 2010, along with lots of other recently-discovered treasures. You would be amazed to know some of the titles on those reels -- apparently the library was using music from every possible source they could find -- and they obviously had a lot of sources. So now, whenever there's a score I'm looking for, I always wonder whether it might not be halfway across the United States, but perhaps it is in my closet somewhere? So in this case, it will have taken 15 years from the time I first wanted to do the project for it to see the light of day.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 20, 2009 - 7:43 PM   
 By:   Jameson281   (Member)

Actual footage from the STAR TREK II soundtrack negotiations:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XyhhFzE5O5U

Man, those movie studio lawyers can be rough . . .

 
 Posted:   Nov 20, 2009 - 7:51 PM   
 By:   Steve Johnson   (Member)

I had a project I wanted to do in 1995. Originally wanted to do a re-recording, but there were no scores to be found anywhere. When I considered doing a release of the original tracks, I was up against the same situation -- no tapes existed either. No leads where anything might be. Nothing. About five years ago I inherited a huge collection of unidentified and unidentifiable reel-to-reel tapes from a film music library that went under, and they were just stored in my closet, and whenever I got a little time free I transferred one to digital. Still no sign of the score I was looking for as I scoured archives around the country where it might be located. Two years ago I'm transferring one of the tapes, and all of a sudden blaring from my speakers I hear the very music I've been searching for all these years! The entire soundtrack was there -- every last stitch of music, including music not used in the film, and it'll be released in early 2010, along with lots of other recently-discovered treasures. You would be amazed to know some of the titles on those reels -- apparently the library was using music from every possible source they could find -- and they obviously had a lot of sources. So now, whenever there's a score I'm looking for, I always wonder whether it might not be halfway across the United States, but perhaps it is in my closet somewhere? So in this case, it will have taken 15 years from the time I first wanted to do the project for it to see the light of day.

Life---- can be beautiful! big grin

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 20, 2009 - 8:58 PM   
 By:   James Corry   (Member)

Remember MMM: "All things come to he who waits."

James A. Corry

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 20, 2009 - 9:09 PM   
 By:   MMM   (Member)

"Life---- can be beautiful!"

Yeah, but between those moments, it can be a real bitch...

 
 Posted:   Nov 20, 2009 - 9:49 PM   
 By:   Jeff Eldridge   (Member)

Well...we started "Madame Bovary" for the Rozsa box in 2004, I think!

Yes, that sounds about right. I think INSIDE DAISY CLOVER took almost as long to see the light of day, didn't it?

 
 Posted:   Nov 20, 2009 - 10:37 PM   
 By:   Lukas Kendall   (Member)


Inside Daisy Clover we started shortly after the LP came out in 1966.

Lukas

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 21, 2009 - 12:00 AM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

Inside Daisy Clover we started shortly after the LP came out in 1966.

Lukas


I remember! You were working on it before you were born - you were tireless. Back then it was going to be a limited edition cassette, then a limited edition 8 track.

 
 Posted:   Nov 21, 2009 - 12:13 AM   
 By:   Francis   (Member)

A question regarding the rights issues. In case of a score of which you haven't yet found any masters or elements, is it possible to still get the lead on it and own the rights to do that title in the future? Or would that be too costly?

Or when you negotiate with the studios, have they ever said for instance "yes, you can release this title, but we want you to release these ones as well" including lesser known or other works out of their catalogue?

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 21, 2009 - 12:23 AM   
 By:   MMM   (Member)

You don't "own" the rights. You license them from the copyright owner, who remains the copyright owner. Buying rights costs more money, and if you're talking about buying a studio property, the odds of them selling you anything are about "zero." You can sometimes buy rights for a small project, but they're usually not worth it, because if somebody's willing to sell you something at an affordable cost, that's probably because the property isn't worth anything. I don't know any soundtrack labels (other than ours in a couple of small instances) that has bought any rights, but I might be mistaken. And I know that our label is nuts, so that explains our behavior. 99.99% of the time, labels are strictly licensing things.

 
 Posted:   Nov 21, 2009 - 12:39 AM   
 By:   Francis   (Member)

99.99% of the time, labels are strictly licensing things.

Thanks for the elaboration. I always assumed that releasing a score meant you had to acquire the rights to do so.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 21, 2009 - 12:53 AM   
 By:   MMM   (Member)

Since "acquire" isn't really a legal term pertaining to music rights, I guess you could say you're acquiring the right to license the music, so I can see why you might have been confused. It can be a very confusing business, especially with old films where music contracts and other such documents have not always survived the eons, and ownership claims can be very confusing.

 
 Posted:   May 28, 2010 - 2:19 PM   
 By:   Yavar Moradi   (Member)

I had a project I wanted to do in 1995. Originally wanted to do a re-recording, but there were no scores to be found anywhere. When I considered doing a release of the original tracks, I was up against the same situation -- no tapes existed either. No leads where anything might be. Nothing. About five years ago I inherited a huge collection of unidentified and unidentifiable reel-to-reel tapes from a film music library that went under, and they were just stored in my closet, and whenever I got a little time free I transferred one to digital. Still no sign of the score I was looking for as I scoured archives around the country where it might be located. Two years ago I'm transferring one of the tapes, and all of a sudden blaring from my speakers I hear the very music I've been searching for all these years! The entire soundtrack was there -- every last stitch of music, including music not used in the film, and it'll be released in early 2010, along with lots of other recently-discovered treasures. You would be amazed to know some of the titles on those reels ...

I wonder if these other recently-discovered treasures are still coming out?

 
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