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This is a comments thread about FSM CD: The Thief Who Came to Dinner
 
 Posted:   Jun 4, 2009 - 12:42 PM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)

Gotta love those conga drums!

And I personally think Mancini made better use of the Martenot [is that what it is here? or is it an organ made to sound like one?] in this period than another composer (nameless) who did it a whole lot, a whole lot later.

And nobody could write more fun parts for a Fender Rhodes. Nobody. With other folks it sounded like someone was substituting for an acoustic piano, but in his writing it was very much its own instrument.

 
 Posted:   Jun 4, 2009 - 1:02 PM   
 By:   Lukas Kendall   (Member)


Hi David,

Actually it's not an ondes Martenot here, it's I think several keyboards that were cutting-edge at the time...I think I saw "Yamaha" written on the paperwork. I tried to identify the keyboards in the liner notes where I could. Very well said about Mancini's fender rhodes writing!

Lukas

 
 Posted:   Jun 4, 2009 - 1:28 PM   
 By:   mark ford   (Member)



And nobody could write more fun parts for a Fender Rhodes. Nobody. With other folks it sounded like someone was substituting for an acoustic piano, but in his writing it was very much its own instrument.


Absolutely David! Mancini seemed to treat it as an independant, newly created instrument with no strong ties to the acoustic piano and wrote to capitalize on its own unique sound.

The man knew his instruments and was a master on how to use them to color his works.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2012 - 5:48 AM   
 By:   Ken G   (Member)

Picked up a used (but mint) copy of this today (along with the 1993 25th Anniversary Edition of "Joanna" by Rod McKuen) and am now playing for a second time - it really is a wonderful listen!

The only other Henry I have is "Wait Until Dark" which I bought recently after being blown away by the movie. Which others can you recommend for a fan of these two? Thanks!

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2012 - 6:42 AM   
 By:   Robert0320   (Member)

Picked up a used (but mint) copy of this today (along with the 1993 25th Anniversary Edition of "Joanna" by Rod McKuen) and am now playing for a second time - it really is a wonderful listen!

The only other Henry I have is "Wait Until Dark" which I bought recently after being blown away by the movie. Which others can you recommend for a fan of these two? Thanks!


If you like your Mancini dark, try Experiement in Terror, Nighwing and Lifeforce

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2012 - 7:07 AM   
 By:   Ken G   (Member)

Thanks Robert0320.

Yeah, I like the dark sounds of "Wait Until Dark", but I also love the upbeat vibe of "Thief". I see that "Experiment In Terror" is available with "Charade" on a twofer. Think I'll try that CD next. Thanks again!

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2012 - 7:17 AM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

Avoid any US RCA CD from the 1980s mastered by Dick Baxter. They sound horrible. The European twofers from the 1990s sound much better.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2012 - 7:20 AM   
 By:   vinylscrubber   (Member)

The sound of the Fender-Rhodes keyboard was a signature of many 70's scores and the two best proponents were Mancini and, better yet, Lalo Schifrin. Roy Budd used it to great effect also.

 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2012 - 7:51 AM   
 By:   chriss   (Member)

The sound of the Fender-Rhodes keyboard was a signature of many 70's scores and the two best proponents were Mancini and, better yet, Lalo Schifrin. Roy Budd used it to great effect also.

Is that a Fender-Rhodes in the Main Titles of Hancock's "Death Wish" from 00:53 and 01:45? One of those great cues missing from the album which was obviously a re-recording.
Wish someone could release the original tracks some day!




 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2012 - 9:27 AM   
 By:   lexedo   (Member)

Re: Fender Rhodes on DW Main Title?

Yes it is Chriss. HH played a FR, and assorted others during the period in question. As did Chick Corea and Joe Zawinul.

I think my fav is HH using the clavinet on the HH live album from the same era (viz., mid-70s). You know who uses a FR well in the more modern sense: Donald Fagen, and in this regard you can check "Morph to Cat" or "The Nightfly."

PS: I didn't view your clips, I used your timings with my version of the DW OST.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2012 - 11:21 AM   
 By:   Simon Morris   (Member)

In The Thief Who Came to Dinner, Mancini shows that - like Quincy Jones and his score for The Split - he can write a catchy and memorable bassline and use it throughout the score.

I think it may have been Lukas who observed that there's more melody in some of these 70's basslines than there is in many entire scores being written today. Alas, as Jim Phelps points out now and then, we don't seem to be getting many of these types of scores being released (so far), as the '80's seem to be taking some precedence.

That's why I'll miss the FSM label.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2012 - 11:45 AM   
 By:   Disco Stu   (Member)

The sound of the Fender-Rhodes keyboard was a signature of many 70's scores



How true. All the sections in the clip above where the instrument is allowed to let its notes roam free, it creates anticipation of the beginnings of brainy 70s crime pictures or politico-thrillers.
It automatically conjures up images of cloud covered september mornings where a train is being zoomed in and in the buffet compartment there's a 70s icon reading a newspaper, the image covered by the yellow letters showing us who else to expect.
In short: things that completely vindicate my sentimental feelings and the conviction that some things were really better back then.

D.S.

 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2012 - 11:54 AM   
 By:   JohnnyG   (Member)

In The Thief Who Came to Dinner, Mancini shows that - like Quincy Jones and his score for The Split - he can write a catchy and memorable bassline and use it throughout the score.

I think it may have been Lukas who observed that there's more melody in some of these 70's basslines than there is in many entire scores being written today. Alas, as Jim Phelps points out now and then, we don't seem to be getting many of these types of scores being released (so far), as the '80's seem to be taking some precedence.

That's why I'll miss the FSM label.



Well said, Simon! I love the energy that comes from that bass melody and I find the lenghty "Big Heist" track in particular to be one of the great pieces of scoring from the '70s, at least for this type of movies!

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2012 - 2:36 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

This album was notoriously hard to find on LP. I had a CD-R. When I first heard the main theme, I thought the A section had an Italian feel, and the B section sounded like Lalo Schifrin. I loved the whole album. So of its time. Naturally, I jumped on the expanded release the day it came out.

Not to diss any of the other Mancini limited edition releases, but the two real gems in this category are "Thief" and "Wait Until Dark." Anyone who loves 60s and 70s scores really should spring for both, assuming they're still available.

 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2012 - 3:01 PM   
 By:   lexedo   (Member)

The sound of the Fender-Rhodes keyboard was a signature of many 70's scores

Like Fielding's Enforcer. Real nice touch.

 
 Posted:   Feb 13, 2012 - 1:06 PM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)

Mancini wrote some ACE secondary themes in his career, and the one in "Soft Scene" is up there among the top.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 13, 2012 - 1:39 PM   
 By:   roy phillippe   (Member)

Hi David,

Actually it's not an ondes Martenot here, it's I think several keyboards that were cutting-edge at the time...I think I saw "Yamaha" written on the paperwork. I tried to identify the keyboards in the liner notes where I could. Very well said about Mancini's fender rhodes writing!

Lukas


The melody of "Thief" is performed on an Arp synth. The Yamaha was a model CS80 and had some great sounds. In particular a "ribbon" over the keyboard that created the glissando sound on Mancini's "Mystery Movie Theme". Eventually these were replaced by smaller keyboards that did the same thing.
Roy

 
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