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 Posted:   Dec 30, 2008 - 10:08 AM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)

Sorry, Mac Manc McManx is just too, too Brit for me to understand.



Thanks, mates!

 
 Posted:   Dec 30, 2008 - 11:17 AM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

Graft = grind, hard work

Chocca = short for 'chockablock' meaning filled up as far as it will go, packed to the gunwhales, loaded, full up

firtle = various meanings for this, some of them extremely rude, but used here in the sense of 'mess about', as in the Scottish word, 'futer'

mithered = nagged at, bothered, whinged at

mental = mental

and that = 'and all that', etc., English equivalent of 'n stuff'.

Monster trucks = large amounts, and slightly bizarre with it.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 30, 2008 - 12:16 PM   
 By:   Greg Bryant   (Member)

Purchase this book:



http://www.amazon.com/British-American-language-dictionary-Norman/dp/0844291048/ref=sr_11_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1230668162&sr=11-1

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 30, 2008 - 3:08 PM   
 By:   CinemaScope   (Member)

A lot of that's from up north (Tall Guy territory). I don't believe anyone in England has ever said "That's a load of graft, mate, it's dead chocca". Maybe an English character in a US TV series.

 
 Posted:   Dec 31, 2008 - 4:56 AM   
 By:   Jehannum   (Member)

A lot of that's from up north (Tall Guy territory). I don't believe anyone in England has ever said "That's a load of graft, mate, it's dead chocca". Maybe an English character in a US TV series.

Not all together in one sentence, perhaps, but individually those expressions are certainly in common parlance.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 31, 2008 - 8:25 AM   
 By:   CinemaScope   (Member)

A lot of that's from up north (Tall Guy territory). I don't believe anyone in England has ever said "That's a load of graft, mate, it's dead chocca". Maybe an English character in a US TV series.

Not all together in one sentence, perhaps, but individually those expressions are certainly in common parlance.


Well I've used "hard Graft" (but hardly ever done it!), & "chocca block" (as in filled right up), but that sentence is as phoney as a nine bob note!

 
 Posted:   Dec 31, 2008 - 11:44 AM   
 By:   PhiladelphiaSon   (Member)

A lot of that's from up north (Tall Guy territory). I don't believe anyone in England has ever said "That's a load of graft, mate, it's dead chocca". Maybe an English character in a US TV series.

American writers wouldn't have used a single on of those words to depict an Brit.

 
 Posted:   Dec 31, 2008 - 4:19 PM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)

Thanks, fellas.

 
 Posted:   Jan 1, 2009 - 10:13 AM   
 By:   Olivier   (Member)

Brits are the weirdest English speakers of all.

razz

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 1, 2009 - 12:05 PM   
 By:   CinemaScope   (Member)

Brits are the weirdest English speakers of all.

razz


That's the great thing about the english language, it's like jazz....you can sort of play around with it.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 2, 2009 - 6:47 AM   
 By:   Membership Expired   (Member)



Well I've used "hard Graft" (but hardly ever done it!), & "chocca block" (as in filled right up), but that sentence is as phoney as a nine bob note!


It's a bit pear-shaped!

 
 Posted:   Jan 2, 2009 - 4:27 PM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)



Well I've used "hard Graft" (but hardly ever done it!), & "chocca block" (as in filled right up), but that sentence is as phoney as a nine bob note!


It's a bit pear-shaped!


Thank you. I heard the phrase "it's gone all pear-shaped" in a modern BBC radio show, and nobody on the radio board knew what it meant or why it meant what it meant.

Can you fill in why it seems to mean "awkward or unruly or unacceptable"?

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 2, 2009 - 6:03 PM   
 By:   Spymaster   (Member)

I heard the phrase "it's gone all pear-shaped" in a modern BBC radio show, and nobody on the radio board knew what it meant or why it meant what it meant.

Can you fill in why it seems to mean "awkward or unruly or unacceptable"?


Well it means "it's all gone tits up" or, to put it more sensitively, "it's all gone horribly wrong".

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 3, 2009 - 3:14 PM   
 By:   Odlicno   (Member)

At work last week i said "it's gone pear-shaped" and got a load of blank looks from a Canadians. I also said "chocca" the same day, by coincidence. I also "had a butcher's" at something. And also when i asked if someone was "taking the mick" they didn't understand that either.

I just stick to saying "eh" and "awesome" now smile

 
 Posted:   Jan 3, 2009 - 3:31 PM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)


Well it means "it's all gone tits up" or, to put it more sensitively, "it's all gone horribly wrong".


The burning question in my mind is "why?" Why does it mean that? Where did it come from?

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 3, 2009 - 11:58 PM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

A lot of that's from up north (Tall Guy territory). I don't believe anyone in England has ever said "That's a load of graft, mate, it's dead chocca". Maybe an English character in a US TV series.

Heh - like Daphne's brother in Frasier. They're from Manchester, but his accent isn't. Speaking of Manchester, the "Manc" bit in the title of the cartoon relates to west of the Pennines, whereas my patch is east of them.

However, Odlicno knows that I do missionary work over there from time to time...

 
 Posted:   Jan 4, 2009 - 12:32 AM   
 By:   Jehannum   (Member)

The burning question in my mind is "why?" Why does it mean that? Where did it come from?

"It's all gone pear-shaped" is one of many phrases whose origins are obscure. When you search for the origins, what you find is usually invented and wrong. There are people who stridently shout down any rival to their pet theory of origin.

To me, it sounds like factory speak: something that's supposed to be circular coming out wrong.

 
 Posted:   Jan 4, 2009 - 7:54 AM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

I always presumed it was a physiological reference about physiques i.e., lots of fat in the waistline ruining previous sleekness. Or a reference to balloons deflating?

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 12, 2009 - 10:14 PM   
 By:   Odlicno   (Member)

A lot of that's from up north (Tall Guy territory). I don't believe anyone in England has ever said "That's a load of graft, mate, it's dead chocca". Maybe an English character in a US TV series.

Heh - like Daphne's brother in Frasier. They're from Manchester, but his accent isn't. Speaking of Manchester, the "Manc" bit in the title of the cartoon relates to west of the Pennines, whereas my patch is east of them.

However, Odlicno knows that I do missionary work over there from time to time...


Missionary work? smile

 
 Posted:   Jan 12, 2009 - 10:29 PM   
 By:   dogplant   (Member)

David, you might want to bookmark this site -- a fun etymology reference run by Michael Qunion, a Cambridge-educated BBC radio veteran, advisor to the Oxford English Dictionary, who has an interesting take on the English language:

http://www.worldwidewords.org

Here's his derivation of 'pear-shaped':

http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-pea2.htm

 
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