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 Posted:   Jul 11, 2008 - 9:52 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

By the late 1950s or early 1960s, composers of sophisticated, seductive, and exotic scores were contractually obligated to include at least one mood-breaking circus, carousel, parade, or can-can cue on each soundtrack album. Composers petitioned studio brass to abolish this policy, explaining that while such cues were relevant within the context of the films, they were unlistenable under any other circumstances. Henry Mancini, a noted wine connoisseur, related an incident in which a romantic evening with his wife was ruined because of this requirement: At a critical moment, while his “Experiment in Terror” album played in the background, the sound of his own ragtime piano cue forced Mancini off of his Scandinavian sectional to swat the tone arm across the record.

But the practice continued. A non-scientific survey of my LP accumulation reveals that these aberrations often occur as album side closers, which at least provides a convenient opportunity to dive for the reject button. The middle of side two, however, is also likely - and more problematic.

Today, CD technology allows those of us with any taste to program these tracks out (although the shuffle play feature is guaranteed to cue up these tracks at the worst possible moments). However, those of us who had the good sense to hang on to our turntables and LPs are still vexed by this curious characteristic of (otherwise) solid 60s soundtracks…

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2008 - 6:27 AM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

I just picked up John Keating's "Hotel," and damn if it doesn't include to mood-busting dixieland numbers. At least they had the good sense to put each one at the end of an LP side.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 28, 2008 - 10:25 AM   
 By:   Pangolino   (Member)

This post made me think of something I'd been meaning to do for years: make a CD of nothing but saloon piano music from Italian western scores. When I first considered driving myself off the deep end, I figured I'd have to have an afternoon or two to waste digging out CDs, etc., but thanks to iTunes, I'm living the dream right now as I type. Now all I have to do is figure out how I'm going to manage to throw back a glass of bourbon with my arms bound in a straitjacket.

 
 Posted:   Sep 29, 2008 - 12:53 AM   
 By:   Ray Worley   (Member)

You know, I can deal with one or two saloon piano cues in a whole Italian Western score CD. But a whole CD of nothing but those cues?
That's masochism.
I salute you...you're a brave man. wink

 
 Posted:   Sep 29, 2008 - 3:17 PM   
 By:   KevinSmith   (Member)

'Circus' from We're Back! A Dinosaur's Story.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 17, 2010 - 8:18 AM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

I just spun Mancini's "99 44/100 % Dead." After opening with a irresistible slice of 70s Euro-tinged urban cop show funk, the next track is a wacky ragtime number with whistling. God, talk about a mood-buster.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 17, 2010 - 12:42 PM   
 By:   TerraEpon   (Member)

Some of us LIKE those cues.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 17, 2010 - 1:33 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

Some of us LIKE those cues.

Great, you can have mine. wink

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 8, 2014 - 10:37 AM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

It never fails, does it?

Today, I'm spinning Dave Grusin's "Winning," and in the middle of side two, this loud parade/dixieland track comes crashing in, ruining the album's otherwise perfect soft-filtered-sunlight-through-the-trees vibe.

 
 Posted:   Feb 8, 2014 - 10:48 AM   
 By:   Maleficio   (Member)

I absolutely love those type of cues!

One of my favs:


 
 
 Posted:   Feb 8, 2014 - 11:00 AM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

No, no, they are just mood-bustingly awful and have no business being on any soundtrack albums.

 
 Posted:   Feb 8, 2014 - 11:04 AM   
 By:   Maleficio   (Member)

No, no, they are just mood-bustingly awful and have no business being on any soundtrack albums.

Thank goodness you're not an album producer.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 8, 2014 - 11:11 AM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)



Thank goodness you're not an album producer.


Actually, I am one.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 1, 2014 - 2:37 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

Just picked up Lilith by Kenyon Hopkins and there is a truly awful parade cut near the top of side two.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 1, 2014 - 3:27 PM   
 By:   bobbengan   (Member)

The 'Newsreel' source cues do a wonderfully malignant job of decimating the reverent, almost liturgical, ghostly, positively transfixing atmosphere concocted for the Christopher Young score that is MURDER IN THE FIRST!

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 2, 2014 - 4:36 PM   
 By:   waxmanman35   (Member)

Prior to consumer video recording, soundtrack albums, aside from possibly providing an ancillary revenue stream, generally served a dual purpose: they were sold as a "souvenir" of the film, something to recall the film. They also acted as publicity for a film. I remember walking down Broadway in the early sixties and seeing record shops (remember those?) featuring splashy window displays of soundtrack albums to promote current films. Because the soundtrack albums were sold to the average person, the editors who compiled the albums possibly often felt it necessary to include some popular pieces of general appeal, rather than strictly dramatic cues. I haven't bought any contemporary soundtrack albums for a long time, but I wonder if the same album editing practice is at work?

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 3, 2014 - 2:21 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

I much prefer it when composers incorporate a 'circussy'/carnival sound in their score proper, like Danny Elfman used to do in the past (and occasionally still does). But I agree that it can be grating on album. Like Mancini's THE GREAT RACE (OK, so it's more polka, but still).

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 3, 2014 - 5:03 AM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

It is a truly awful practice.

Vladimir Cosma's "L'Affaire Crazy Capo," and otherwise perfect album, is marred by a parade cue.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 3, 2014 - 6:04 AM   
 By:   TerraEpon   (Member)

I much prefer it when composers incorporate a 'circussy'/carnival sound in their score proper, like Danny Elfman used to do in the past (and occasionally still does). But I agree that it can be grating on album. Like Mancini's THE GREAT RACE (OK, so it's more polka, but still).

Well again, unless you happen to enjoy that kind of of music.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 17, 2015 - 6:05 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

Listening to Johnny Mandel's "Americanization of Emily" album, gorgeous top to bottom, except for a godawful march that comes in on track two of side one.

I guess any film with Julie Andrews is contractually obligated to have at least one repulsive track on it.

 
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