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 Posted:   Nov 25, 2007 - 7:07 AM   
 By:   neotrinity   (Member)

Equal Tyme for the Illustrious Ladies Department:





Beam forward to the '60s and we can start the visual riches with (among others still to come) Diahann Carroll



And, natcherly, advancing even further, no one could overlook Halle



And our favorite, supremely talented Janet Maclachlan



[ Yeah, we know we can pleasantly predict 99.9% of you are goin'
"WHOOOOOOOOO????!!!". More anon, stick around. ]

Tho, a'course, lovely Lena foreshadowed (hah?) all of them.



Tho, we'd lay even odds at this very moment someone's nimple fingers are already at warp seven
typing their response and trumping us with sharing enlightening info that probably pre-dates the illustrious Miss Horne.

G'wan, Sir M, we dare ya. In fact, M.H.H. (Most Honorable Historian), we even welcome ya! ... wink

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 25, 2007 - 9:23 AM   
 By:   joec   (Member)

how about NINA MAE McKINNEY, star of HALLELUJAH!

She predated all of the above.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/f/f0/Nina_age_16.jpg/220px-Nina_age_16.jpg

 
 Posted:   Nov 25, 2007 - 11:40 AM   
 By:   Jehannum   (Member)

My intellectual contribution:

Mmmmhh, Halle Berry.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 25, 2007 - 2:37 PM   
 By:   neotrinity   (Member)

Thanx, Joec, you beat Sir M to the proverbial punch. Introducing, Mme. Nina Mae:



As for jovial Jeh, leave it to you, mate, to overturn that lovely definition we once heard of the worst aspect
of being an "intellectual" (as someone alive only from the neck up).



You definitely turn THAT designation around wink ...

 
 Posted:   Nov 25, 2007 - 3:43 PM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)

I think that Miss Horne is the queen of them all. Whatta voice! Only she could have sung a number and looked swell in a bubble bath at the same time, as she did for one movie!

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 26, 2007 - 9:13 AM   
 By:   neotrinity   (Member)

Your crowning her sophisticated Queen isn’t foundationally far-fetched, Dave; we’d second that elevated emotion instantly.



"I was unique in that I was the kind of black that white people could accept …



I was their daydream. I had the worst kind of acceptance because it was never for how great I was or what I contributed. It was because of the way I looked." – from Lena, her 1986 biography.



As for



it’s revealing, if not altogether surprising, that bubble-bath scene was removed from the original film and not seee in public until “That’s Still Entertainment” in 1994.



Still, she remains unmistakably, memorably and magnificently in a consummate class of her own (which Hollywood, in its usual epic minnow-mindedness, never had the imagination (let alone humanity) to showcase with the same expertise it can expertly exploit)

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 26, 2007 - 11:56 AM   
 By:   manderley   (Member)

.....I was their daydream. I had the worst kind of acceptance because it was never for how great I was or what I contributed. It was because of the way I looked." – from Lena, her 1986 biography.....


Lena---meet Ava Gardner, Lana Turner, Marilyn Monroe, Hedy Lamarr, Jane Russell, Clara Bow and the endless parade of actresses who were more acknowledged for how they looked than what they could deliver as performers over the terms of their careers.

Lena Horne does, indeed, as you say, occupy a place "unmistakably, memorably, and magnificently in a consummate class of her own"---worthy of every accolade.

For me, however, I've never been quite convinced that she was as great a DRAMATIC actress as, say, Dorothy Dandridge.


.....Hollywood, in its usual epic minnow-mindedness, never had the imagination (let alone humanity) to showcase [her] with the same expertise it can expertly exploit).....

So what else is new? Endless highly-talented people have failed in the movie biz because someone didn't see the latent talent there. However, it remains, historically, that the brief musical guest appearances of Horne in MGM films of the forties---accompanied by full glamor regalia---lighting, wardrobe, sets, makeup--- Technicolor, and high-production gloss, is virtually the only case of an African-American performer appearing in a single-studio's films in this form in the forties period on a regular basis---and those appearances remain memorable today.

The MGM machine "gave" Horne class and style, and an audience expectation of her image, the underpinnings of which she has been able to carry through her nearly 60 year career after leaving MGM. The "Lena Horne" of today LOOKS like the "Lena Horne" of the MGM years, with only age taken into consideration. The talent has always been there.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 26, 2007 - 12:50 PM   
 By:   neotrinity   (Member)

Ta-DAAAAA!

We doth not disagree (in degree or anything else), M Sir (and, by that transposition, we don't figure you look anything like Judi Dench, either! wink).

If "the truth sets you free" - especially from illusions in an industry whose very impetus (wondrous or wretched) is permanently based on such - then neither of us (or others) have blinders on.

[ Tho we maintain it's definitely debatable some of those other visual lovelies you cite had a helluva lot more exposure for a lot longer in films than Horne did. Dandridge excelled by far in the dramatic arena - no question - whilst, even into the late sixties, Horne was still visual eye-candy in an ostensible thriller such as Death of a Gunfighter



as Richard Widmark's wife.

With today's irresponsible "society-as-victim" mentality pervading virtually every inch of the personal and professional arena, not every obstacle can be ascribed to one's ethnic (or even sexual) origin (and preference) but, by the same colorful token, it'd be downright naive to say some things aren't.

As The Gospel According to Robert McCall goes:



"There ARE no surprises" ...

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 1, 2007 - 7:05 AM   
 By:   neotrinity   (Member)

And, around the same tyme as Dorothy yet before Diahann, one musn't forget the always sublime Ruby Dee.



Oh, Ossie, you lucky hombre ... smile

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 3, 2007 - 2:35 PM   
 By:   neotrinity   (Member)



And, a’course, Nichelle made many a heart go pumping where it hadn’t gone before once her beauty beamed upon us.



And she remains galactically gorgeous even Now



(Then and Always)

 
 Posted:   Dec 3, 2007 - 3:21 PM   
 By:   SheriffJoe   (Member)

Nichelle is truly one of the most stunningly beautiful women I have ever had the fortune of seeing. Beautiful AND intelligent.

Joe

 
 Posted:   Dec 3, 2007 - 4:09 PM   
 By:   Jehannum   (Member)

I liked this episode for some reason ...

 
 
 Posted:   May 29, 2008 - 8:28 AM   
 By:   neotrinity   (Member)



Going



Where



No One



Has



Gone



Before
Department:



... wink

 
 Posted:   May 29, 2008 - 11:37 AM   
 By:   Eric Paddon   (Member)

Halle was the only thing that made sitting through "The Flintstones" tolerable! smile

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 23, 2008 - 6:31 AM   
 By:   neotrinity   (Member)

Nutritious Nichelle Rich Redux Department:















Bravooooooooooooo,



O Timeless Beauty ... smile

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2008 - 7:53 AM   
 By:   neotrinity   (Member)

In Fond Remembrance and Praise of Department:



There are those timeless talents who don't receive the rich (and equally overdue) recognition they've long deserved until the latter part of their career. So it was with the graceful gravity that was Gloria Foster, who didn’t become universally known until her enchanting turn as The Oracle in the original Matrix (plus its first sequel).



Aside from its unexpectedly unorthordox casting – “Not quite what you expected, eh?” she quipped with that marvelous Mona Lisa mystique of a smile -



she intelligently (and craftily) imbued the role with such whimsical charm, subtle substance, ambiguous authority and an overall panache of sparkling personality that she deftly became the mesmerizing center whenever she appeared.



Miss Foster had a long and glorious reputation on the Broadway stage with roles in, among others, “In White America”, “Medea” “The Cherry Orchard” and “Having Our Say”. Aside from a few episodes of “Law and Order” and projects with Bill Cosby and Sidney Poitier, she wasn’t seen as often as one might’ve wished due to her own selectivity with when, why, how and in what she appeared in.

Married for years to



of the 60s “Mod Squad”









Miss Foster had only recently finished filming her scenes to "The Matrix Reloaded"



when she died of diabetes.



Her arrival on screen elicited an immediate warm smile of recognition knowing, in advance, the many layers of The Oracle she revealed – concern, surprise, a spot of unexpected hurt when her overtures are rejected (“Well, suit yourself”) - put one in memorable mind how audiences fondly came to view Desmond Llewellyn’s Q.



She leaves behind a luminous legacy whose foundation will always be her magical and consummate contribution as an Oracle utterly unlike any other.



"Our time is up ... Good luck, kiddo."



Rest easy, Dear Lady. There'll ne'er be another like you. smile

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 17, 2008 - 8:25 AM   
 By:   neotrinity   (Member)



Dysfunctional ‘Divas’ Be Damned – Give Us Her Distinctive Class Any (and for All) Tyme Department:







































... smile

 
 Posted:   Dec 17, 2008 - 11:29 AM   
 By:   Eric Paddon   (Member)



80s hair was so wonderful! smile

And now that one breakthrough sitcom of the late 60s "Room 222" is coming to DVD in March, it'd be nice if the same could also be done for Diahann's series "Julia".

 
 Posted:   Dec 17, 2008 - 11:41 AM   
 By:   Steve Johnson   (Member)



80s hair was so wonderful! smile

And now that one breakthrough sitcom of the late 60s "Room 222" is coming to DVD in March, it'd be nice if the same could also be done for Diahann's series "Julia".



I'm surprised Fox is issuing Room 222 on DVD. I'm afraid it's going to be awfully dated. Ditto Julia.

I'll never forget when Archie Bunker first met Louise Jefferson when they movied next door and was hard pressed to say something- after an uncomfortable silence, he asked, "How'd you like the Julia show last night?" Louise replied, "Fine- how did you like Doris Day?"

big grin

 
 Posted:   Dec 17, 2008 - 11:50 AM   
 By:   Eric Paddon   (Member)

Actually, Fox is licensing it out to Shout! They've decided that doing hour long 60s shows with 28 episodes is too much to handle (hence why "Ironside" is sadly abandoned after two seasons) but half hour stuff like "Adam-12" and now "Room 222" is easier for them to do.

And heck, "The Doris Day Show" has gotten its *entire* run out from MPI, so no reason why "Julia" shouldn't. smile (Indeed 60s sitcoms do a much better job of getting their full run out than 70s and 80s ones have).

 
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