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 Posted:   Sep 7, 2007 - 11:09 AM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

I have just read the novel for the very first time and was bowled over. In a few minutes I am going to get the 40s film adaptation and finally see it for the first time. The fact it has an Alfred Newman score has me rather extra-excited. I may even get the Bill Murray redo but somehow I can't see Murray in the lead role. No way. But the mind she is open.

Anyone seen the Tyrone Power one? know the score?? read the novel??? I am listening...

 
 Posted:   Sep 7, 2007 - 11:31 AM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

re: the score

http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=37317&forumID=1&archive=1

 
 Posted:   Sep 7, 2007 - 11:32 AM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

re: the movie and Power (plus observations about "The Fountainhead".

http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=41926&forumID=7&archive=0

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 7, 2007 - 11:34 AM   
 By:   Jake   (Member)

It's a great film, ambitious and very moving, and definitely one of Tyrone Power's very best performances along with BLOOD AND SAND and NIGHTMARE ALLEY. Haven't read the Somerset Maugham book yet, although I plan to do this. I loved THEATRE and OF HUMAN BONDAGE.

The Alfred Newman's score is great. Lots of source cues at the beginiining but when the dramatic underscore kicks in later on, it's absolutely wonderful. I haven't seen the 1984 remake, but the score by Jack Nitzsche is also wonderful.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 7, 2007 - 11:35 AM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Now how I did I miss those! Thanks, Ron. I shall reply to those from hereon.

PS
just did but it won't come up on the 'boardconfused

 
 Posted:   Sep 7, 2007 - 1:27 PM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

Now how I did I miss those! Thanks, Ron. I shall reply to those from hereon.

PS
just did but it won't come up on the 'boardconfused



Ummmm....it did rise to the top...but under non-film score discussion (it was about the movie, not the score). The score thread did come up on the General Discussion list.

 
 Posted:   Sep 7, 2007 - 1:35 PM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)


I love this film, Howard. Clifton Webb is amazing in it.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 7, 2007 - 1:37 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Oh for goshsakes. I don't inhabit that area. So I am just going to transfer the relevant thoughts over here.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 7, 2007 - 1:39 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

JSWalsh started things off thusly:

I really enjoyed recent (re)viewings of these two films. There's something really entertaining about big Hollywood movies that attempt some philosophical depth, whether or not they succeed.

Any suggestions for a third film to fit into this little "Hollywood Philosophical Novel Adaptation" festival?

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 7, 2007 - 1:40 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

John B. Archibald replied:

As for philosophical Hollywood, you might try another cinematic adaptation of Maugham, THE MOON AND SIXPENCE(1942), which introduced Herbert Marshall playing the Maugham surrogate, a performance he essentially repeated in RAZOR'S EDGE. (BTW: I'd love to see the original technicolor sequence at the end of MOON, but it's not included on the DVD release, sadly.)

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 7, 2007 - 1:43 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Ron Pulliam replied:

[re Fountainhead] I think it's "meant" to be philosophical -- it certainly has Tyrone Power trying to explain to his grandfather, to his best friend, to his mentor from Oxford and to virtually anyone else who will listen just what it is that makes him hate Normans so much and why he just HAD to seek something adventurous --- and I'm talking about the story "The Black Rose", recently issued in the Tyrone Power DVD box.

Frankly, I found little philosophical in it except for the idea that we each, in or own way, must find what we truly love...something worth dying for.

But Power was as perplexing as he was as Larry Darrell in "The Razor's Edge"...never able to verbalize exactly what he was seeking or what he ultimately found, but both films let us know he "found" it.

Still and all, "The Black Rose" is a richly produced film and has some sterling performances, not the least of which is Orson Welles as a Turkish general.

 
 Posted:   Sep 7, 2007 - 1:44 PM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

Oh for goshsakes. I don't inhabit that area. So I am just going to transfer the relevant thoughts over here.

Snob.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 7, 2007 - 1:45 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

why I oughta...

...John B. Archibald replied:

But Power was as perplexing as he was as Larry Darrell in "The Razor's Edge"...never able to verbalize exactly what he was seeking or what he ultimately found, but both films let us know he "found" it.

But that's the conundrum behind anything concerning spirituality. It's some kind of a never-ending search, more perceived in others than in oneself. The people who've "found it," as you say, are usually self-effacing enough not to admit it.

Audrey Hepburn talks about it in THE NUN'S STORY, when she says, "I thought I'd reach some kind of resting place...," and she is curtly informed by her Mother Superior: "There is no resting place."

Even Power says in RAZOR'S EDGE that he has had great moments of doubt about the path he has taken.

Let me direct you to T.S.Eliot's THE COCKTAIL PARTY, specifically a dialogue between the characters Celia Coplestone and Sir Henry Harcourt-Reilly. Celia says at one point:
"You see, I think I really had a vision of something
Though I don't know what it is. I don't want to forget it.
I want to live with it. I could do without everything,
Put up with anything, if I might cherish it.
In fact, I think it would really be dishonest
For me, now, to try to make a life with anybody!
I couldnt' give anyone the kind of love-
I wish I could - which belongs to that life."

I have a wonderful lp set of the original cast of this play, wherein Alec Guiness and Irene Worth do this scene. Wonderful.

It would appear, then, that this spiritual journey of which we speak is more something for the individual to fathom, than for anyone else to attempt to explain.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 7, 2007 - 4:56 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

The_Mark_Of_Score-O replied:

But Power was as perplexing as he was as Larry Darrell in "The Razor's Edge"...never able to verbalize exactly what he was seeking or what he ultimately found, but both films let us know he "found" it.

Being another young-man-journeys-to-the-mysterious-East-to-search-for-the-meaning-of-life tale, THE BLACK ROSE is THE RAZOR'S EDGE, for all intents and purposes, though by 1950 Power was getting pretty long in the tooth to play a member of any "lost" generation.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 7, 2007 - 4:59 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Ron Pulliam replied:

But that's the conundrum behind anything concerning spirituality. It's some kind of a never-ending search, more perceived in others than in oneself. The people who've "found it," as you say, are usually self-effacing enough not to admit it.

Audrey Hepburn talks about it in THE NUN'S STORY, when she says, "I thought I'd reach some kind of resting place...," and she is curtly informed by her Mother Superior: "There is no resting place."

Even Power says in RAZOR'S EDGE that he has had great moments of doubt about the path he has taken.

Let me direct you to T.S.Eliot's THE COCKTAIL PARTY, specifically a dialogue between the characters Celia Coplestone and Sir Henry Harcourt-Reilly. Celia says at one point:
"You see, I think I really had a vision of something
Though I don't know what it is. I don't want to forget it.
I want to live with it. I could do without everything,
Put up with anything, if I might cherish it.
In fact, I think it would really be dishonest
For me, now, to try to make a life with anybody!
I couldnt' give anyone the kind of love-
I wish I could - which belongs to that life."

I have a wonderful lp set of the original cast of this play, wherein Alec Guiness and Irene Worth do this scene. Wonderful.

It would appear, then, that this spiritual journey of which we speak is more something for the individual to fathom, than for anyone else to attempt to explain.


Sigh. I see.

Sigh.

So, the crux of the matter is that anything or anyone promising a path to enlightenment or truth is basically only saying "step this way"...but you're on your own finding it.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 7, 2007 - 5:01 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

John B. Archibald replied:

Sigh. I see.

Sigh.

So, the crux of the matter is that anything or anyone promising a path to enlightenment or truth is basically only saying "step this way"...but you're on your own finding it.


Well then, young man, just what did you expect?

And if I handed you the exact meaning of life, especially your own, just handed it to you on a silver salver, would you then even accept it?

I doubt not. No, the way for you is yours and yours alone, with only you to understand the where and the why of it.

And perhaps that's just as well. Because what we speak of here is of the spirit and cannot be explained in mere text. Though many have tried.

It's a question of finding your own grounded-ness, as t'were. And that's something only you can understand, within your own heart.

Though, mysteriously, it is always something you seem to have no difficulty recognizing in others.

We are all signposts for each other's enlightenment....

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 7, 2007 - 5:03 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

JSWalsh replied:

The reason I like these movies is not because they give one the meaning of life as if it were a secret message, but because they show that there is meaning in seeking the meaning of life. (Or that the meaning of life is to seek the meaning of life.) Because the seekers in these movies have richer lives than those who aren't even looking.

I'm reminded of those who've said that even if God doesn't exist, their lives are richer because they lived by what they perceived as his rules.

As an atheist, I have to say I find that the happiest people I've met are those who have some religious faith, as are some of the most tortured.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 7, 2007 - 5:06 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

John B. Archibald replied:

I've always enjoyed THE MOON AND SIXPENCE, a film of another Maugham novel, this one about a stockbroker who gives up everything to go paint. Loosely based on the life of Gaughin, it introduced Herbert Marshall as the Maugham narrator, a role he later repeated in THE RAZOR'S EDGE, and generally concerned concepts of art and how making art affects not only the artist's life but also the lives of those he encounters.

It's also one of the better, if not the best, performances of George Sanders in the lead role.

Originally, it had a Technicolor ending, but that is not included on its current DVD release.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 7, 2007 - 5:09 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

JSWalsh replied:

I'm going to order that one, I've had a few folks suggest it. I really enjoy Herbert Marshall, and he was very enjoyable in the role of Maugham in Razor's Edge.

I've always enjoyed THE MOON AND SIXPENCE, a film of another Maugham novel, this one about a stockbroker who gives up everything to go paint. Loosely based on the life of Gaughin, it introduced Herbert Marshall as the Maugham narrator, a role he later repeated in THE RAZOR'S EDGE, and generally concerned concepts of art and how making art affects not only the artist's life but also the lives of those he encounters.

It's also one of the better, if not the best, performances of George Sanders in the lead role.

Originally, it had a Technicolor ending, but that is not included on its current DVD release.


I'm picking this up tomorrow, can't wait--sounds like my kind of movie.

I can't get enough of these philosophical flicks, even if most turn out to be junk.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 7, 2007 - 5:12 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

John B. Archibald replied:

I'm picking this up tomorrow, can't wait--sounds like my kind of movie.

I can't get enough of these philosophical flicks, even if most turn out to be junk.


MOON AND SIXPENCE is by no means junk.

There was even a Hallmark Hall of Fame TV adaptation of it, in the early 60's, which starred Laurence Olivier of all people.

If you like films of faith, try also THE NUN'S STORY, with its remarkable performance by Audrey Hepburn, GREEN DOLPHIN STREET, for some wonderful scenes on spiritual growth between Donna Reed and Dame May Whitty, and two John Ford films: THE FUGITIVE, with Henry Fonda as a perhaps disillusioned priest, and THREE GODFATHERS, a western about spiritual redemption if you please, and from John Ford of all people! (I almost fell over when I caught this on TCM at one point, expecting just another western, and getting an amazing allegory! I couldn't wait until I was able to own it on DVD.)

I think you'll enjoy all of these...

Just found a newer DVD version of THE MOON AND SIXPENCE yesterday, which includes the Technicolor ending. The disk has both the "original theatrical version," essentially black&white with a color sequence at the end, as well as an all black&white version.

However, be prepared for a statement at the end of the film, excoriating the main artist character, presumably so that the film would comply with the Hays Office of censorship...

I'll be interested to hear what you have to say about MOON AND SIXPENCE...

 
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