Film Score Monthly
FSM HOME MESSAGE BOARD FSM CDs FSM ONLINE RESOURCES FUN STUFF ABOUT US  SEARCH FSM   
Search Terms: 
Search Within:   search tips 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
 Posted:   Jun 8, 2007 - 9:39 AM   
 By:   Scott M (Oldsmith)   (Member)

The Seven Wonders of the World? I can name them:

1. Bernard Herrmann
2. Alfred Newman
3. Max Steiner
4. Franz Waxman
5. Hugo Friedhofer
6. Jerry Goldsmith
7. John Williams

;-)

 
 Posted:   Apr 26, 2012 - 4:01 PM   
 By:   missouricatman   (Member)

Just wanted to thank the members of this board for all the info. on this interesting recording. I happened upon two near mint copies of it (jackets and disks), along with another Admiral title and picked them up simply because at 59 I'm old enough to recognize the Cinerama logo. Not sure where to go with them from here, but again, without the information you all have posted here, I wouldn't even know what I've got.

Thanks again.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 9, 2014 - 1:49 PM   
 By:   leslie   (Member)


Admirers of Jerome Moross should note that an online US company ( I am not certain of its official statuus ) is currently offering a 2-cd set of the complete soundtrack ( including narration ) of Cinerama's Seven Wonders of the World. Although there are no liner notes or track listings ( the latter are however available on the website ), the sound quality is fine and the cost relatively modest.

The narration is not too intrusive and ther are many passages which are narration free, including the Entracte, Finale and Exit Music. At the very least, we now have an opportunity to hear Moross's splendid score as he intended and in its proper context.

It is always possible that the UK Sepia label which has alreadt issued the original studio tapes of Windjammer and Cinerama Holiday has something up its sleeve in terms of a future release for Seven Wonders.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 27, 2014 - 3:02 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

SEVEN WONDERS OF THE WORLD (1956) was shot over a period of several years, through 32 countries, and was directed by five directors using separate crews. Perhaps that's why it required three composers to score--Jerome Moross, David Raksin, and Emil Newman. Newman conducted the Cinerama Symphony Orchestra during the recording sessions.

Segments of the score can be heard to good advantage in this re-created stereophonic trailer, from Cinerama expert David Strohmaier, who is digitally restoring the film.

 
 Posted:   Apr 28, 2014 - 5:09 PM   
 By:   George Komar   (Member)

Thanks, Bob, for the "Seven Wonders of the World" and "Search for Paradise" trailers. I was impressed with the remastering on the "Cinerama Holiday" and "South Sea Adventures" Blu-rays. Let's hope that these two new installments are released soon.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 20, 2014 - 2:21 AM   
 By:   mulan98   (Member)

Quite please with the Sepia CD.

I'm sure I've heard the actual Seven Wonders theme in other contexts. Maybe a trailer for another movie. Or was it a hit at the time?

Listening to Jerome Moross's beautiful contributions to this score, it's rather sad that he only seems to be remembered, by non movie music aficionado's, for The Big Country.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 11, 2014 - 10:51 PM   
 By:   eewee1975   (Member)

Regarding the Sepia CD: Does anybody know who wrote what? The album cover mentions 3 composers: Emil Newman, David Raksin, and Jerome Moross. The liner notes also mention Sol Kaplan (misspelled once as "Kaplin"). The liners also break it down as follows:

David Raksin: New York, Darjeeling, Grand Canyon
Sol Kaplan: Japanese and Arabic scenes
Jerome Moross: Jerusalem and the Holy Land; Athens and Ancient Greece
Emil Newman: overall composing effort and score structure (?)

Matching this information with the track list is not easy. One could guess by trying to identify each composer's individual style, but it would be great to have an actual list, if possible.

 
 Posted:   Dec 31, 2015 - 2:29 PM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)

Regarding the Sepia CD: Does anybody know who wrote what? The album cover mentions 3 composers: Emil Newman, David Raksin, and Jerome Moross. The liner notes also mention Sol Kaplan (misspelled once as "Kaplin"). The liners also break it down as follows:

David Raksin: New York, Darjeeling, Grand Canyon
Sol Kaplan: Japanese and Arabic scenes
Jerome Moross: Jerusalem and the Holy Land; Athens and Ancient Greece
Emil Newman: overall composing effort and score structure (?)

Matching this information with the track list is not easy. One could guess by trying to identify each composer's individual style, but it would be great to have an actual list, if possible.


Ditto. It is very annoying that this release gives zippo credit to composers for the various cuts. I was looking forward to zero-ing in on the Raksin stuff right away, and the best the liner notes do is say he scored the ones eewee names above.

Which is not much help since I'm getting the feeling that a good bit of all of these three (especially New York) were not edited into this release. I remember a long flying sequence that Raksin scored that doesn't appear to be here.

Also, I'd bet my reputation as a Raksin Geek that he scored the Sahara sequence. It decidedly sounds like him.

Since I know his style, I can examine the cuts closely to see where I think Raksin contributed. Does anyone know Moross well enough to do the same for him? I'm thinking that Eugene might.

(It's reported elsewhere here that Emil Newman did the theme.)

And has anyone compared the amount of music on the DVD to this cd?

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 1, 2016 - 10:56 AM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

Emil Newman: overall composing effort and score structure (?)

I (and others) have wondered whether Emil Newman ever composed anything at all. McCarty's Film Composers in America, which is based on archival research, credits him with not a single cue. "Music director" seems to have been his real occupation.

 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
© 2016 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved.