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 Posted:   Jan 31, 2018 - 4:37 PM   
 By:   Peter Greenhill   (Member)

Just saw LA Confidential again tonight at BFI in London, 20 years after seeing it at the same venue. Wonderful movie, complex, violent, strong performances and a brilliant score by Jerry Goldsmith. This has to be one of his very best. Edgy, moody, atmospheric. I love Horner's Titanic but this one deserved the Oscar for best score in 1997 imo. Film scoring at it's best.

 
 Posted:   Jan 31, 2018 - 4:46 PM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

It's a great score, works stand-alone too. But the deliberate Waterfront homages mean some of it is perhaps better classified as adaptation and variation?

 
 Posted:   Jan 31, 2018 - 4:46 PM   
 By:   SchiffyM   (Member)

It's a great score, works stand-alone too. But the deliberate Waterfront homages mean some of it is perhaps better classified as adaptation and variation?

Were those deliberate? How do we know? And why reference that score?

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 31, 2018 - 5:54 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Youse guys're lazy--

http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?pageID=1&forumID=1&threadID=32427&archive=1

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 31, 2018 - 6:38 PM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

Howard, that thread brought back memories.

I watch L.A. Confidential every few years and always enjoy it.

 
 Posted:   Jan 31, 2018 - 6:43 PM   
 By:   The Mutant   (Member)

Would love a complete score to this. This actually has one of his most terrifying cues in my opinion: “The Body” It would fit into any horror movie, and the way it works in the film is so incredibly tense.

 
 Posted:   Jan 31, 2018 - 7:27 PM   
 By:   David Sones (Allardyce)   (Member)

Would love a complete score to this. This actually has one of his most terrifying cues in my opinion: “The Body” It would fit into any horror movie, and the way it works in the film is so incredibly tense.

Yes, please.

 
 Posted:   Jan 31, 2018 - 8:28 PM   
 By:   SchiffyM   (Member)

Thinking about WILLIAMDMCCRUM's post…

Those who worship Goldsmith (and I'm one) and can't ignore the "On the Waterfront" similarity assume he must have done it on purpose. But I don't know why he would have – the time frame is similar, but the coasts are opposite, and the films have very little in common. Also, Leonard Bernstein receives no credit, making the premise that it's an adaptation very hard to buy.

But after the six-notes from "Waterfront," the melody goes in a different direction, and the scores are not otherwise similar. It's not like Goldsmith's influences aren't sometimes apparent (Bartók is very obvious in some of his "Twilight Zone" scores, for instance), but he is not generally known for taking melodies from others and using them as his own.

So in this case, I just have to say that yes, the beginnings of the "On the Waterfront" theme are in "L.A. Confidential," but I don't think it's a purposeful reference. What would it be referencing? It's hard to imagine Goldsmith wasn't familiar with Bernstein's work, but maybe when he was composing this score, he forgot. Or he just took the theme and felt like nobody would notice. I have no idea. But either way, I forgive him.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 1, 2018 - 12:55 AM   
 By:   Peter Greenhill   (Member)

If score masters still exist then this once certainly deserves an expanded release.

 
 Posted:   Feb 1, 2018 - 7:14 AM   
 By:   Shaun Rutherford   (Member)

Thinking about WILLIAMDMCCRUM's post…

Those who worship Goldsmith (and I'm one) and can't ignore the "On the Waterfront" similarity assume he must have done it on purpose. But I don't know why he would have – the time frame is similar, but the coasts are opposite, and the films have very little in common. Also, Leonard Bernstein receives no credit, making the premise that it's an adaptation very hard to buy.

But after the six-notes from "Waterfront," the melody goes in a different direction, and the scores are not otherwise similar. It's not like Goldsmith's influences aren't sometimes apparent (Bartók is very obvious in some of his "Twilight Zone" scores, for instance), but he is not generally known for taking melodies from others and using them as his own.

So in this case, I just have to say that yes, the beginnings of the "On the Waterfront" theme are in "L.A. Confidential," but I don't think it's a purposeful reference. What would it be referencing? It's hard to imagine Goldsmith wasn't familiar with Bernstein's work, but maybe when he was composing this score, he forgot. Or he just took the theme and felt like nobody would notice. I have no idea. But either way, I forgive him.


He clearly knew On The Waterfront well, what with City Hall being more than inspired by it as well.

 
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