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This is a comments thread about FSM CD: Coma/Westworld/The Carey Treatment
 
 Posted:   Sep 11, 2016 - 11:36 AM   
 By:   Kev McGann   (Member)

I don't have the FSM CD or booklet to hand, so not sure if it's covered in the notes, but I was wondering, given the Crichton love for Goldsmith, if Jerry was sought for Westworld during production.
I always loved the film and remember the buzz in school after it had been shown on telly during the 70s.
Not sure how or why my mum and dad let me stay up and watch it, but it thrilled, excited and terrified me in equal measure.
I like the Karlin score, but one can only dream how amazing an early 70s Goldsmith soundtrack would have added to this film.
What d'yall think?

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 12, 2016 - 8:18 AM   
 By:   vinylscrubber   (Member)

I suspect it was a matter of WESTWORLD's relatively low budget. Crichton was extremely lucky to catch Goldsmith in Spring of '73 for his first film, PURSUIT, as this was in the temporary lean period for Goldsmith when he was still taking on TV shows and made-for-TV movies. By summer, Goldsmith's feature cache had caught on again.

Crichton alludes to budgetary concerns on WESTWORLD in the forward to the Ballentine pocketbook novelization (or was it the screenplay?) but does not mention the scoring situation. He regretted that they could not afford decent special effects for a exterior view of the WESTWORLD shuttle arriving at the resort.

 
 Posted:   Sep 12, 2016 - 9:06 AM   
 By:   jkheiser   (Member)

I don't have the FSM CD or booklet to hand, so not sure if it's covered in the notes, but I was wondering, given the Crichton love for Goldsmith, if Jerry was sought for Westworld during production.
I always loved the film and remember the buzz in school after it had been shown on telly during the 70s.
Not sure how or why my mum and dad let me stay up and watch it, but it thrilled, excited and terrified me in equal measure.
I like the Karlin score, but one can only dream how amazing an early 70s Goldsmith soundtrack would have added to this film.
What d'yall think?


Sure it's fun to imagine "what if" but Jerry Goldsmith already has a staggering amount of representation. Alternately, imagining a world with more sci-fi movies scored by Fred Karlin is a depressing thought exercise because it will never be true. I am glad for the Karlin we have, but really wish there was more, more, more!

Incidentally, this release has the nuttiest combination of music and sequencing! It's all great music but makes for a wacky listening experience.

 
 Posted:   Sep 12, 2016 - 11:18 AM   
 By:   johnmullin   (Member)

Also, the picture was completed without Crichton. There was a strike of some sort going on when the film was in its final stages, and MGM did several things to the picture (including the infomercial prologue) without Crichton's involvement or approval.

I don't know if that was a contributing factor to who wound up scoring the movie, but it sounds like MGM took the movie over at a certain point and did what they liked with it.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 12, 2016 - 4:35 PM   
 By:   MikeP   (Member)

Also, the picture was completed without Crichton. There was a strike of some sort going on when the film was in its final stages, and MGM did several things to the picture (including the infomercial prologue) without Crichton's involvement or approval.

I don't know if that was a contributing factor to who wound up scoring the movie, but it sounds like MGM took the movie over at a certain point and did what they liked with it.



According to Crichton, the first cut of the movie was "horrible", "boring" and "slack". But working with the film editor they recut the film and made improvements. But it was MC and the editor making the changes.

And yep, there was a writer's strike at the time, but the idea of opening the film with the commercial was Crichton's all along, but since he couldn't contribute due to the strike, an actual ad agency did the opening commercial scene. He also recalled that after that second cut, Fred Karlin was refining his score. Finally the film was finished, but Crichton does state he was involved in finishing the picture every step of the way right up until the public sneak preview which got rave audience feedback.

All of this is in the introduction to the screenplay paperback, so it seems, based on his recollection published at the film's release, that the picture wasn't taken away from him.

So he says big grin

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 13, 2016 - 8:57 AM   
 By:   Kev McGann   (Member)

"I am glad for the Karlin we have, but really wish there was more, more, more!"
-------------------------
Absolutely jk.
I was not decrying the score the film got (which I do like).
I was just re-thinking (given the way Crichton sought Goldsmith on many subsequent films, like Coma, Great Train Robbery and Runaway) how Westworld would sound with that dirty orchestral, early 70s Goldsmith sound, topped with his fuzzy electronics.
Wild Rovers meets Satan Bug or Logan's Run perhaps!
Can you imagine the theme or motif he would have given Yul Brynner's Gunslinger!
It's typical for Jerry, with all the Crichton works he did over the years, that John Williams swoops in with his ONE effort and creates a monster that reverberates the world over (and still resonates to this day).

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 13, 2016 - 9:12 AM   
 By:   DavidCorkum   (Member)

I like the Karlin score, but one can only dream how amazing an early 70s Goldsmith soundtrack would have added to this film.
What d'yall think?


Goldsmith's missing out on this assignment has always been a sore point for me (not to criticize Karlin's work). Goldsmith's ability to take on projects with diversified elements and represent them in a unified manner musically was always a particular skill of his, so the idea of mixing a western score with robot music would have been a perfect challenge for him.

 
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