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 Posted:   Jul 25, 2014 - 3:01 PM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Welcome to the Subversive Seventies! Revisionist western films flooded the market. Tradition is disregarded and the old masters of the Golden Age (Boetticher, Ford, Hawks, Mann, Walsh) ceased to work.

1. High Plains Drifter (1973) (Clint Eastwood)

2. The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976) (Clint Eastwood)

3. Ulzana's Raid (1972) (Robert Aldrich)

4. The Great Northfield Minnesota Raid (1972) (Philip Kaufman)

5. Bite the Bullet (1975) (Richard Brooks)

6. Posse (1975) (Kirk Douglas)

7. The Beguiled (1971) (Don Siegel)

8. Pat Garret and Billy the Kid (1973) (Sam Peckinpah)

9. Jeremiah Johnson (1972) (Sydney Pollack)

10. Man in the Wilderness (1971) (Richard C. Sarafian)

Contemporary list
1. JW Coop (1972) (Cliff Robertson)
2. Junior Bonner (1972) (Sam Peckinpah)

1970 list
1. There Was a Crooked Man... (Joseph L. Mankiewicz)
2. Two Mules for Sister Sara (Don Siegel)

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2014 - 3:29 PM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

no wives!!! i refuse to talk to wives!!!

just a suggestion mr member but you may wanna wait a day or so with the regularity of these western threads - just to give the forum inhabitants a chance to consider their selections and thinking time to post and a greater gap will also get you more replies.


wot no Duck you sucker??? scandalous!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2014 - 3:38 PM   
 By:   CinemaScope   (Member)

Little Big Man (1970) Arthur Penn
Valdez Is coming (1970) Edwin Sherrin
Big Jake (1971) George Sherman
Gui La Testa (1971) Sergio Leone
Lawman (1971) Michael Winner
Jeremiah Johnson (1972) Sydney Pollack
The Life & Times Of Judge Roy Bean (1971) John Huston
Ulzana's Raid (1972) Robert Aldrich
Pat Garrett & Billy The Kid (1973) Sam Peckinpah
Blazing Saddles (1974) Mel Brooks
The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976) Clint Eastwood
The White Buffalo (1978) J Lee Thompson

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2014 - 3:42 PM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

no wives!!! i refuse to talk to wives!!!

just a suggestion mr member but you may wanna wait a day or so with the regularity of these western threads - just to give the forum inhabitants a chance to consider their selections and thinking time to post and a greater gap will also get you more replies.




Don't worry, it's my last thread related to western films decades.
I've covered 40 years of western films: my favorite years, by the way.
You have all the time in the world now.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2014 - 3:54 PM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

Little Big Man (1970) Arthur Penn
Valdez Is coming (1970) Edwin Sherrin
Big Jake (1971) George Sherman
Gui La Testa (1971) Sergio Leone
Lawman (1971) Michael Winner
Jeremiah Johnson (1972) Sydney Pollack
The Life & Times Of Judge Roy Bean (1971) John Huston
Ulzana's Raid (1972) Robert Aldrich
Pat Garrett & Billy The Kid (1973) Sam Peckinpah
Blazing Saddles (1974) Mel Brooks
The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976) Clint Eastwood


id take cinemascopes near perfect list and just add:-
Billy two hats, monte walsh, great northfield minnesota raid, spikes gang, Doc, Hunting party, chatos land, bad company, shootout, breakheart pass, culpepper cattle company, last hard men and my name is nobody and Companeros. maybe the Cowboys.

 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2014 - 4:05 PM   
 By:   Mark R. Y.   (Member)

Bad Company (1972)
Blazing Saddles (1974)
Duck You Sucker (1972)
The Great Northfield Minnesota Raid (1972)
Hearts of the West (1975)
Junior Bonner (1972)
The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean (1972)
Little Big Man (1970)
McCabe and Mrs. Miller (1971)
My Name is Nobody (1973)
Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid (1973)
Posse (1975)
Wild Rovers (1971)

There's a kind of farewell to the classic western by the mid-1970s: Posse ends with disillusion, Blazing Saddles makes fun of the whole genre, and Hearts of the West is about the beginnings of the movie western.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2014 - 4:08 PM   
 By:   Graham Watt   (Member)



maybe the Cowboys.


"You slip up once more, Carson, someone gonna put a bullet through your head. "Maybe the Cowboys" ain't no movie I ever saw in the old picture houses - the way they used t'be. You're sittin' there real relaxed with your girl, all curled up like at the picture show and - BANG! - some son-of-a-gun has just left your brains all over that nice girl's dress which you was gettin' your hand up a second before."

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2014 - 4:13 PM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

oh alrite then, Watt, stand easy. The cowboys. although i think Rio Lobo was better.
and The shootist come to think of it. but its worth it for wayne and Dern.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2014 - 10:10 AM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

Do some of you western aficionados think that the 70's kind of signaled the death of westerns? Seems like I have less to choose from in this decade, and I think that we had a lot fewer westerns after the 70's. (Then along came Dances With Wolves, and Hollywood made a few westerns each year.)

To some of the above lists, I'll add SOLDIER BLUE.
I also liked: Ulzana's Raid, Valdez Is Coming, The Cowboys, and The Shootist.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2014 - 10:19 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Do some of you western aficionados think that the 70's kind of signaled the death of westerns?


Agreed! They voluntarily subverted and destroyed the genre because it didn't fit the doxa.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2014 - 10:25 AM   
 By:   CinemaScope   (Member)

Yup, they started off strongly, but tailed off badly from the mid-seventies on, & never really recovered. There's only a couple of westerns I like from the 80's on. I can only think of two right now, Tombstone & Open Range.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2014 - 10:41 AM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

westerns took a burst of bullets in the gut with the wild bunch - stumbled about clutching their wounds and went very thoughtful and melancholy for a few years - or cracked jokes - and died proper seven years later with Josey wales.

 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2014 - 10:44 AM   
 By:   chriss   (Member)

Jeremiah Johnson
Junior Bonner
McCabe and Mrs. Miller

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2014 - 12:16 PM   
 By:   Richard-W   (Member)

Many westerns were released throughout the 1970s but it seems people have forgotten about them. These are all good westerns with something new and original to offer. Some of them -- like McCabe & Mrs. Miller, The Cowboys, Ulzana's Raid, Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid, Heartland, The Long Riders -- achieve greatness.

1980
Tom Horn -- directed by William Wiard.
The Long Riders -- written by the Keach brothers, directed by Walter Hill.
Heaven's Gate -- directed by Michael Cimino.

1979
The Sacketts -- written Louis L'Amour, directed by Robert Totten.
Mr. Horn -- written by William Goldman, directed by Jack Starret.
Eagle's Wing -- directed by Anthony Harvey.

1978
Heartland -- directed by Richard Pearce.
Goin' South -- directed by Jack Nicholson.
Comes a Horseman -- directed by Alan J. Pakula, photographed (wow!) by Gordon Willis.

1977
Another Man, Another Chance (USA / France) -- directed by Claude Lelouch

1976
The Shootist -- written by Glendon Swarthout, directed by Don Siegel.
The Outlaw Josey Wales -- ponderous, redundant version directed by Clint Eastwood.
The Missouri Breaks -- written by Thomas McGuane, directed by Arthur Penn.
From Noon til Three -- written and directed by Frank Gilroy.

1975
I Will Fight No More Forever -- directed by Richard T. Heffron.
Hearts of the West -- directed by Howard Zieff.

1974
Zandy's Bride (USA / Sweden) -- directed Jan Troell.

1973
The Red Pony -- written by John Steinbeck, script and directed by Robert Totten.
Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid -- written by Rudolph Wurlitzer, directed by Sam Peckinpah.

1972
When the Legends Die -- directed by Stuart Miller.
Ulzana's Raid -- written by Alan Sharp, directed by Robert Aldrich.
Pocket Money -- directed by Stuart Rosenberg.
The New Land (USA / Sweden) -- directed by Jan Troell.
Junior Bonner -- directed by Sam Peckinpah.
Jeremiah Johnson -- directed by Sydney J. Pollack.
The Cowboys -- directed by Mark Rydell.
Buck and the Preacher -- directed by Sidney Poiter and Joseph Sargent.
The Bounty Man -- written by Jim Byrnes, directed by John Llwellyn Moxey.
Bad Company -- photographed by Gordon Willis, directed by Robert Benton.

1971
Skin Game -- directed by Paul Bogart and Gordon Douglas.
McCabe & Mrs. Miller -- written by Robert McLeod, directed Robert Altman.
Lawman -- written by Gerald Wilson, directed by Michael Winner.
The Last Picture Show -- written by Larry McMurtry, directed by Peter Bogdanovich.
J.W. Coop -- directed by Cliff Robertson.
The Hired Hand -- written by Alan Sharp, directed by Peter Fonda.
Hannie Caulder -- directed by Burt Kennedy.
A Gunfight -- directed Lamont Johnson.
The Emigrants (USA / Sweden) -- directed by Jan Troell.

I left out westerns that were popular and quite good but nothing exceptional -- like THE GREAT NORTHFIELD MINNESOTA RAID, MAN AND BOY, SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL GUNFIGHTER, BIG JAKE, THE CULPEPPER CATTLE COMPANY, CHATO'S LAND, JOE KID, THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN RIDE!, MAN IN THE WILDERNESS, THE LEGEND OF N----- CHARLEY, THE SOUL OF N----- CHARLEY, CAHILL U.S. MARSHALL, THE MAN WHO LOVED CAT DANCING, THE DEADLY TRACKERS, THE TRAIN ROBBERS, POSSE, THE LIFE AND TIMES OF JUDGE ROY BEAN, THE SPIKES GANG, BITE THE BULLET, BREAKHEART PASS, THE MASTER GUNFIGHTER, ADIOS AMIGO, THE APPLE DUMPLING GANG, THE APPLE DUMPLING GANG RIDES AGAIN, HOT LEAD AND COLD FEET, THE DUCHESS AND THE DIRTWATER FOX, RANCHO DELUXE, HAWMPS!, ROOSTER COGBURN, THE LAST RIDE OF THE DALTON GANG, THE LAST HARD MEN, RETURN OF A MAN CALLED HORSE, GRAYEAGLE, THE WHITE BUFFALO, THE FRISCO KID, WINDWALKER, etc.

There were three international westerns worth noting: John Sturges' THE VALDEZ HORSES (1973) a fine drama with Bronson and Ireland filmed in Spain; Don Chafey's BILLY TWO HATS (1978) with Peck and Warden filmed in the Sinai desert, of all places, with a superb script by Alan Sharp; and Monte Hellman's CHINA 9 LIBERTY 37 (1978) with Warren Oates, Jenny Agutter and Sam Peckinpah in a cameo, filmed in Italy and Spain.

SHOOT THE SUN DOWN (1978) was an interesting experimental western by a first-time director who never made another film. There's an excellent transfer on blu-ray.

Easily the worst western of the decade was Altman's BUFFALO BILL AND THE INDIANS starring Paul Newman. Robert Altman crapped on the Centennial with this bad, inaccurate, misinformed and subversive history. Beautifully designed and photographed but the story and direction were garbage. It failed miserably at the box-office and deserved too. Like SOLDIER BLUE, another bad, inaccurate, mis-informed "history" it was a film impossible to like.

Near the end of the decade, television networks aired several mini-series competitively that were among the best westerns of the decade; particularly noteworthy were THE McCAHANS aka HOW THE WEST WAS WON, THE AWAKENING LAND (1978), CENTENNIAL (1978), MR. HORN (1979) and THE SACKETTS (1979). There was also a more sophisticated view of the American west depicted in long-running hit programs like LITTLE HOUSE ON THE PRAIRIE and THE LIFE AND TIMES OF GRIZZLY ADAMS. Some of the made-for-tv films proved as good as the features, such as THE BRAVADOS (1972) and the amazing I WILL FIGHT NO MORE FOREVER (1975).

If someone wants to start an 1980s to 2000s thread I'll find some thoughts to contribute.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2014 - 12:38 PM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)


I left out several westerns that were popular and quite good but nothing exceptional -- like.... THE OUTLAW JOSEY WALES


what???? mmm, marginally controversial.
is anyone else not just the least bit intrigued why Another man another chance and heavens gate makes Richards list but poor old josey gets shafted???!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2014 - 12:47 PM   
 By:   Richard-W   (Member)

I've read the two historical novels by Forest Carter on which THE OUTLAW JOSEY WALES is based. Eastwood uses the main frame but discards the nuances and subtleties. The books are a richer story. The film pounds the depth of the story right out of existence. It could be argued that Eastwood didn't understand the novels at all. It's an okay film, though, just nothing exceptional.

Also, I've never been that big an Eastwood fan. He's okay but I don't lose my head over him like some of you do, and I don't give him a pass when he dumbs down and screws up, which he does more often than not.

I would like to see an entirely different adaptation of the novels, one at a time, with neither burdened by "the man with no name" persona. Eastwood's persona just weighs them down. For example Jeff Bridges or Dennis Quaid when they were young, or even Harrison Ford, would have made a great Josey Wales.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2014 - 1:26 PM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

ive read the wonderful books by Forrest carter, too, richard - the second one has him revenging in mexico from memory - but the adaption to film was fine - to be honest the dialogue and the story and set pieces were so strong that it would have been hard for my granny to direct it badly. great material made an exceptional western.

what do the rest of you think?

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2014 - 1:45 PM   
 By:   Kev McGann   (Member)

(Maybe) The Cowboys wink
Ballad Of Cable Hogue
Man Who Loved Cat Dancing
High Plains Drifter
Outlaw Josey Vales

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2014 - 1:49 PM   
 By:   Richard-W   (Member)

Why are you obsessing over THE OUTLAW JOSEY WALES? I enjoy the film as well but I don't make too much out of it.

Didn't you see HEARTLAND or EAGLE'S WING ? They are a lot more interesting and worth talking about than Eastwood's one-note pontification.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2014 - 1:49 PM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

I do appreciate The Outlaw Josey Wales as a film and as a score.
It has a wonderful supporting cast and exciting folklore-oriented bent.

 
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