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 Posted:   Jul 31, 2014 - 12:23 AM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)


But it's still a floor.


Oi TG, dont do that 'Yorkshire stirring thing' or he'll be back with another dictionary!!
leave it, its not worth it, step away, nothing more to see here.



by the way, where are the shovels?

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2014 - 3:00 AM   
 By:   Cochise   (Member)

"Will Penny" is a film that deserves to be better known. While most of it is fairly standard -- though always interesting and engaging -- melodrama, the first twenty minutes or so may be the most accurate depiction of what it was like to be a real cowboy ever put on film: cold, hungry, uncomfortable, lonely and with few prospects for the future.

The Hollywood Western, more than anything, created the myth of the gunslinger and frontier "justice," but ironically (when one considers who starred in it it) it goes a long way toward demolishing that myth (though no film does that more than Henry King's excellent "The Gunfighter").

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2014 - 3:00 AM   
 By:   Cochise   (Member)

"Will Penny" is a film that deserves to be better known. While most of it is fairly standard -- though always interesting and engaging -- melodrama, the first twenty minutes or so may be the most accurate depiction of what it was like to be a real cowboy ever put on film: cold, hungry, uncomfortable, lonely and with few prospects for the future.

The Hollywood Western, more than anything, created the myth of the gunslinger and frontier "justice," but ironically (when one considers who starred in it it) it goes a long way toward demolishing that myth (though no film does that more than Henry King's excellent "The Gunfighter").

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2014 - 4:27 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)



by the way, where are the shovels?



I don't know about the shovels (and by the way, we call them spades up here, as you well know) but I know where the other thing is.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2014 - 10:14 AM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

dont get me started about that other thing!!

hes a rat. whole family was rats. Woulda growed up to be a rat.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2014 - 4:23 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Counting from 1 to 10 (1961-1970) here is my short list of the best westerns of the 1960s:

1970 The Wild Rovers -- directed by Blake Edwards.


I bow to no man in my admiration for WILD ROVERS, but you're really stretching the definition of "western films of the 1960s" to include this film, which didn't hit theater screens until 18 June 1971.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2014 - 4:41 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

The 1960s had the last good measure of sturdy, work-a-day westerns--made by actors and directors with numerous credits in the genre.

I'd include among these:

1968 The Scalphunters - with Burt Lancaster, directed by Sydney Pollack
1968 Hang 'Em High - directed by Ted Post
1968 Firecreek - with James Stewart and Henry Fonda, directed by Vincent McEveety
1967 Welcome to Hard Times - with Henry Fonda, directed by Burt Kennedy
1967 The War Wagon - directed by Burt Kennedy
1967 The Last Challenge - with Glenn Ford, directed by Richard Thorpe
1967 Chuka - with Rod Taylor, directed by Gordon Douglas
1966 The Texican - with Audie Murphy, directed by Lesley Selander
1965 The Glory Guys - directed by Arnold Laven
1964 A Distant Trumpet - directed by Raoul Walsh
1963 Cattle King - with Robert Taylor, directed by Tay Garnett
1961 A Thunder of Drums - with Richard Boone, directed by Joseph M. Newman
1960 The Plunderers - with Jeff Chandler, directed by Joseph Pevney
1960 One Foot In Hell - with Alan Ladd, directed by James B. Clark
1960 Cimarron - with Glenn Ford, directed by Anthony Mann

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 1, 2014 - 1:34 AM   
 By:   Richard-W   (Member)

Good list, Bob. Those are certainly sturdy choices. THE GLORY GUYS was written by Peckinpah, you know.

I didn't use to think much of the 1966 remake of STAGECOACH, but when I saw the clean, sharp, widescreen anamorphic Twilight Time DVD I found myself thoroughly enjoying it. Bloody, suspenseful western action and a good-natured riff on the original. Gordon Douglas directed several damn good westerns. I understand TT may upgrade it on blu-ray next year.



Counting from 1 to 10 (1961-1970) here is my short list of the best westerns of the 1960s:

1970 The Wild Rovers -- directed by Blake Edwards.


I bow to no man in my admiration for WILD ROVERS, but you're really stretching the definition of "western films of the 1960s" to include this film, which didn't hit theater screens until 18 June 1971.


Did I get the date wrong? Oops. It happens sometimes.

 
 Posted:   Aug 1, 2014 - 4:11 AM   
 By:   Thomas   (Member)

My Favourite Western is 'The Big Country' but I can't include that (and a few others, 'The Horse Soldiers', 'Rio Bravo', 'The Man From Laramie') so here is my list of favourites from the 60s which I have on DVD:

The Alamo
North to Alaska
Cimarron
How The West Was Won
The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance
The Good, The Bad and The Ugly
The Professionals
Once Upon A Time In The West
True Grit

I think all those titles are from the 60s...

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 9, 2014 - 11:28 AM   
 By:   Richard-W   (Member)

They are indeed all from the 1960s, BUT The Good the Bad and the Ugly and Once Upon a Time In the West are spaghetti westerns, not Westerns. It is important to make a distinction between the classic, traditional American western and the European hybrid. Internally and thematically they are very different things. The spaghetti western is largely responsible for killing the genre America created out of its national experience.

It looks like Criterion is finally getting THE SHOOTING and RIDE IN THE WHIRLWIND (both 1965) ready for blu-ray release, after sitting on them for over a decade.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 9, 2014 - 12:45 PM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

pa!!! that dang woodpecker is back agin!!!

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 9, 2014 - 6:27 PM   
 By:   Richard-W   (Member)

Cochise:
"Will Penny" is a film that deserves to be better known. While most of it is fairly standard -- though always interesting and engaging -- melodrama, the first twenty minutes or so may be the most accurate depiction of what it was like to be a real cowboy ever put on film: cold, hungry, uncomfortable, lonely and with few prospects for the future.


True, but what makes the film special is his decision to let go off the woman who loves him. He could have the family he always needed, but he has to let go of them for reasons. He has to give them up. Heston is so damn good in these scenes. Never saw a spaghetti western be as real and as down-to-earth as WILL PENNY.

Cochise:
The Hollywood Western, more than anything, created the myth of the gunslinger and frontier "justice," but ironically (when one considers who starred in it it) it goes a long way toward demolishing that myth (though no film does that more than Henry King's excellent "The Gunfighter").


How does Henry King's THE GUNFIGHTER (1950) demolish the myth of the gunslinger and "frontier justice"? It seems to me that the goal of the film is too tell that story better than any other film, and it does. It does. It's the best gun fighter film I've ever seen. But, I should point, there really were gunfighters in the American west. For example, William H. "Billy the Kid" Bonney hired his gun out in the Lincoln County War. That's a fact. John Wesley Hardin was a gunfighter for hire, a man who took money to assassinate lawmen. I could go into a historical accounting that would prove the reality behind the myth, at least in part, but history would just bore everybody. There were gunfighters in the American west, that's the important thing.

 
 Posted:   Aug 9, 2014 - 6:39 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

The Hollywood Western, more than anything, created the myth of the gunslinger and frontier "justice," but ironically (when one considers who starred in it it) it goes a long way toward demolishing that myth (though no film does that more than Henry King's excellent "The Gunfighter").

Cochise, do you agree with Richard-W's assertion that the Spaghetti Western is not a western?

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 10, 2014 - 12:35 AM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

yeah cochise, we would be so interested to hear your view on this?

 
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