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 Posted:   Jul 24, 2014 - 4:53 PM   
 By:   Montana Dave   (Member)

Finally, a Summer movie for Adults. Here is a review of Woody's 'Magic in the Moonlight' and the performance of Collin Firth sounds like it should be hilarious.

www.newyorker.com/magazine/2014/07/28/spell

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 24, 2014 - 10:11 PM   
 By:   Richard-W   (Member)

Thanks for linking the review.

Woody Allen's films don't always play where I live, but I will drive a distance to see this one.

You know, it occurs to me, I've been going to see Woody Allen's films all my life, since I first started going to movies in the late 1960s. Woody's always been there.

 
 Posted:   Jul 24, 2014 - 10:21 PM   
 By:   Mark R. Y.   (Member)

"...old CinemaScope lenses..." I might have to go see this one in a theater.

 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2014 - 4:48 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I'll be seeing it asap of course, and posting my delightful review in this thread, of course. I mentioned my enthusiasm in the "Sequels, Prequels, Monsters, Robots, Super-Heroes" thread, which is my search for "Grown up" movies. Of course, of course, of course:

"Seeing this photo of Emma Stone (being directed by Woody) has me excited about the upcoming release of Allen's latest film, Magic in the Moonlight. The film opens July 25 in select cities but will open nationwide soon after.

I'm enthusiastic about MitM for this reason as well as its 1920s-South-of-France setting and Woody's perpetual obsession over death and the meaning of the universe. If the film's trailer is any indication MitM also looks to be stunningly photographed. I can't wait to see this!"



http://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=98149&forumID=7&archive=0

The film's website has a list of all the places it'll be playing:

http://sonyclassics.com/magicinthemoonlight/dates.html

Oh, and though stating this is "playing the wrong room", the sight of Emma Stone's unbelievably pale skin in the above photo gives me a jolt every time I see it. As the MitM trailer itself states, she is a vision.

 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2014 - 5:50 AM   
 By:   Mr. Jack   (Member)

I have never seen a Woody Allen movie (unless Antz qualifies).

 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2014 - 6:44 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I have never seen a Woody Allen movie (unless Antz qualifies).

I've never seen Antz, so we're even. wink

Maybe Allen isn't the kind of filmmaker that interests you. After all, you've avoided him this long. smile

If you do decide to give his movies a chance, I would suggest starting off with Midnight in Paris but if you want to see one in which he appears, try Annie Hall.

Let us know how it goes, if it does in fact "go" at all. wink

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 26, 2014 - 12:55 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

I have never seen a Woody Allen movie (unless Antz qualifies).

I've never seen Antz, so we're even. wink

Maybe Allen isn't the kind of filmmaker that interests you. After all, you've avoided him this long. smile

If you do decide to give his movies a chance, I would suggest starting off with Midnight in Paris but if you want to see one in which he appears, try Annie Hall.

Let us know how it goes, if it does in fact "go" at all. wink


Not sure why anyone would recommend starting knowledge of Woody with Midnight in Paris, even if one loves that film, and I guess I'm one of the few who doesn't. The new one sounds dreadful, actually, and many of the reviews I've seen confirm that suspicion.

No, if you want to know about Woody, best to start right at the beginning with Take the Money and Run and Bananas - that's the Woody that took the film comedy world by storm and it's the only way you can see the growth of the artist, watch him hitting his peak, and then watch the hit and miss of everything post 1980. I do enjoy some of those films, but most are just not to my liking.

 
 Posted:   Jul 26, 2014 - 2:34 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Not sure why anyone would recommend starting knowledge of Woody with Midnight in Paris, even if one loves that film, and I guess I'm one of the few who doesn't. The new one sounds dreadful, actually, and many of the reviews I've seen confirm that suspicion.

No, if you want to know about Woody, best to start right at the beginning with Take the Money and Run and Bananas - that's the Woody that took the film comedy world by storm and it's the only way you can see the growth of the artist, watch him hitting his peak, and then watch the hit and miss of everything post 1980. I do enjoy some of those films, but most are just not to my liking.


The reason I mention MiP is because Allen's recent work is a lot less broadly played than the early (and excellent) films you suggest. However, I feel that "easing" in a curious newcomer who might not take to the over-the-top comedies and neurotic nebbish stuff as played by Allen himself as opposed to the surrogates who have played variations on the same character afterwards.

I recommended Annie Hall second because it is the imo quintessential Allen film.

 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2014 - 8:15 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Montana Dave you may like this- Allen discusses directing, editing, and various directors of photography:

http://www.rogerebert.com/interviews/simply-do-it-talking-with-woody-allen-about-directorial-style

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2014 - 8:35 AM   
 By:   CinemaScope   (Member)

Wow, I find myself in agreement with hainshisway. Midnight In Paris was OK, but I thought it was such a slight movie, more like a comedy sketch, with the lead playing a young Woody Allen, walk & all. You could sum the whole thing up in one sentence: today is the golden yesterday that someone in the future would like to go back to.

I used to sit in half empty cinemas enjoying the early comedies that the critics had to time for at all (I think of them as his Bob Hope movies). And then Annie Hall came along, & all those Johnny-come-lately critics were all over him (but it was a damn good movie). The one film I came out of the cinema hating was Manhattan, all those spoiled characters up their own arses. I was so glad to find out years later that Allen didn't like it either.

 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2014 - 8:48 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Well, I think Mr. Jack has left the room (meaning this thread) so that just leaves us to disagree about Allen's films. I wonder which ones we all actually like? I'll have to check that old Favorite Woody Allen thread to see who chimed in.

As "slight" as MiP is, I just cannot explain why I love it so. No accounting for taste, I reckon...

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2014 - 9:37 AM   
 By:   Montana Dave   (Member)

Montana Dave you may like this- Allen discusses directing, editing, and various directors of photography:

http://www.rogerebert.com/interviews/simply-do-it-talking-with-woody-allen-about-directorial-style


Thanks! I await this and all titles to the dvd releases.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2014 - 2:39 PM   
 By:   tarasis   (Member)

Just watched the trailer earlier this evening, looks pretty fun & interesting.

 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2014 - 3:19 PM   
 By:   mastadge   (Member)

Looks like it could be okay. I thought Midnight in Paris was pretty fun but To Rome with Love was truly dreadful, and Whatever Works and You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger were both pretty forgettable. I hope this one's at least good, even if it's not a classic.

 
 Posted:   Aug 1, 2014 - 1:58 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Woody Allen's SLEEPER (1973). A spectacular poster by Robert McGinnis. I'd never seen this before:

 
 Posted:   Aug 1, 2014 - 4:45 PM   
 By:   Mark R. Y.   (Member)

More proof that the 1970s was the best decade for fun and eye-catching movie posters.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 1, 2014 - 6:53 PM   
 By:   Richard-W   (Member)

I like Woody Allen's work in general. He's a genuine artist. Sometimes the ethnic jokes go over my head, but as a dramatist and a comedian he's been consistently observant, creative and engaging since I became aware of him in the late sixties. I'm one of those people who liked INTERIORS and STARDUST MEMORIES and ZELIG during his experimental period, and I consider those truly great films. He tries out different things, different approaches, emphasizing one thing and then another. Lately I've been catching up with the films I've missed in the theater. I never used to miss a new film of his. I'm glad he's still around and still making movies. I still like what I see. He still has a lot to offer. Spending a couple of hours with a Woody Allen film is always a good thing.

 
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2014 - 2:21 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Finally, a Summer movie for Adults. Here is a review of Woody's 'Magic in the Moonlight' and the performance of Collin Firth sounds like it should be hilarious.

www.newyorker.com/magazine/2014/07/28/spell


Saw it yesterday afternoon, and loved it despite its shortcomings. Turgid review to follow.

If you are a Colin Firth fan, then you must see it.

 
 Posted:   Aug 4, 2014 - 4:09 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

My turgid review of Magic in the Moonlight, though not nearly as turgid as I wanted it to be.

*Possible Spoilers*




The film itself is one of Woody’s lighter efforts but thoroughly enjoyable nonetheless. The costumes, sets, photography, choice of music (mostly Bix Beiderbecke) were all exquisite. Fans of ‘20s jazz will love the soundtrack. Cast performances were all consistently good, with no weak links, though Marcia Gay Harden had nothing to do whatsoever. She was utterly wasted here, which is a shame. Emma Stone was delightful and cute. She gets to wear the most gorgeous clothes and is charming as the young woman who may or may not be a spiritual medium. She and Firth had nice chemistry together with their banter sounding natural and completely unforced. It may be testament to their acting ability but they made a believable couple, which of course doesn't happen until the end, so the two maintain the tension necessary until the denouement. The infamous age gap “issue” was never a factor at any time.

Woody’s script is not one of his finest. Though necessary, there is a lot of exposition at the beginning and the story’s “big twist” is easily figured out. I had it in about ten minutes or so, but that can be forgiven by the dedicated Allen fan. Too many scenes lack the punch of making Sophie and Stanley a romantic couple. There’s a brief bit in the observatory and on their many drives along the French coast, but it felt padded though these scenes; however, thanks to Firth and Stone as well as the cinematography and music, these are never dull, but there should have been more substance to them.

Besides, the real attraction in Magic in the Moonlight is Colin Firth. He plays an aspect of the Woody persona usually farmed out to great actors like Max Von Sydow; the caustic, sarcastic, and unlikable cynic, though Firth is so talented that he is likable despite his character’s arrogance and rudeness which is displayed right from the time we meet him. The other characters comment on this but deal with it in that classy 1920s upper crust way.

Recurring Allen themes and motifs: escaping the thunderstorm to take refuge in an observatory (Manhattan), the older man wanting to take on the younger woman as his protégée and lover, the cruelty and pointlessness of existence, illusion as palliative, magicians, and the transient nature of beauty.

 
 Posted:   Oct 3, 2014 - 12:29 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Okay Montana Dave, Magic in the Moonlight arrives on DVD and Blu-Ray December 16, 2014:

http://www.amzn.com/B00O0292GW

 
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