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 Posted:   Jul 11, 2014 - 12:45 PM   
 By:   jackfu   (Member)

I’m curious as to how you sort your film score titles on your music player. Particularly, the ones that start with “The”. Do you include “The”, or do you use the old library style (Towering Inferno, The)? I find the former slightly annoying since I’ve got over 50 that start with “The”. When I try the latter, I find my tendency is to overlook or run past some in searching for them. Any preferences?

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 11, 2014 - 2:02 PM   
 By:   Kev McGann   (Member)

I don't have any set pattern, but if the THE is pointless (like for The Towering Inferno - or something like The Great Escape - where the rest of the title will suffice) I will drop it, but I tend to keep it for titles like The Fury or The Swarm.

 
 Posted:   Jul 11, 2014 - 2:12 PM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

I drop the "The" in all instances.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 11, 2014 - 4:31 PM   
 By:   manderley   (Member)

Once upon a time---before the computer revolution---these things were very appropriately and completely worked out by librarians, document filers, index listings, etc. Nearly everyone subscribed to the old system and it was a perfectly good and almost infallible solution.

With the advent of the internet, the programmers and code writers---many of whom apparently had spelling and alphabetizing difficulties---instituted new systems which don't make a lot of filing sense.

"The" is just one of these. If you KNOW the title of the film is THE TOWERING INFERNO it all works out fine in this system. If you don't know, you'll likely not be able to find the film unless you look in two places---certainly not the most efficient and speedy system.

"A", "An", "Mister", "Mr.", "Doctor", "Dr", "Mrs.", "Ms", "Missus", and "Mistress" are a few others---along with numbers like "13 Rue Madeleine", "The 39 Steps", "1776", "101 Dalmatians", etc.......a nightmarish path to weave through today.

Just because something is current and modern doesn't necessarily make it functional and improved.

But the process of writing and putting down alphabet symbols to express the complete thought is changing rapidly today and texting and its varying forms make abbreviations the words of the moment, with spelling and coherence often lost along the way.

This all works fine until a texting error, and its interpretation, causes a major disaster.













 
 Posted:   Jul 11, 2014 - 4:35 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

I’m curious as to how you sort your film score titles on your music player. Particularly, the ones that start with “The”. Do you include “The”, or do you use the old library style (Towering Inferno, The)? I find the former slightly annoying since I’ve got over 50 that start with “The”. When I try the latter, I find my tendency is to overlook or run past some in searching for them. Any preferences?

Yes, I always put "The" at the end like your example. (Towering Inferno, The) Think we're supposed to do that with "A" and "An" but I don't on those.

 
 Posted:   Jul 11, 2014 - 4:40 PM   
 By:   mastadge   (Member)

I’m curious as to how you sort your film score titles on your music player. Particularly, the ones that start with “The”. Do you include “The”, or do you use the old library style (Towering Inferno, The)? I find the former slightly annoying since I’ve got over 50 that start with “The”. When I try the latter, I find my tendency is to overlook or run past some in searching for them. Any preferences?

I leave definite articles in the title, but omit them in the "sort by" field. Best of both worlds!

 
 Posted:   Jul 11, 2014 - 6:16 PM   
 By:   PhiladelphiaSon   (Member)

I don't organize. Too OCD, for me. However, if I did, I'd drop the "The".

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2014 - 6:52 AM   
 By:   jackfu   (Member)

Great input! I think I'll try the idea of dropping "The" where it isn't needed as some of you have suggested. Thanks! - jack

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2014 - 12:36 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

I drop the "The" in all instances.



It is only to be used when it is part of name like The Who, The The etc

One of the things that drove me crazy about the old FSM index was they didn't drop "The"
so we get pages and pages of film titles starting with "THE"
D'OH!

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2014 - 4:52 PM   
 By:   Adm Naismith   (Member)

For ripped album names I leave it- It's part of the title.

It does annoy my sensibilities, but my OCD says keep it complete.


The CDs themselves are arranged by the release date of the movie, and jumbled within that slot.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 16, 2014 - 7:54 AM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

Machine indexing is idiotic. That iTunes employs such a dubious method is one of my objections for that (alas!) inescapable juggernaut. If anyone wants to learn the basic principles of indexing, just check out the reference section of your bookstore, under writing or publishing. The Chicago Manual of Style offers a good introduction. It's very expensive, but you can always consult it or some similar handbook in the library.

Foreign-language films (or just foreign titles) are where it gets interesting. A Spaniard would speak of the Cid (Cid, el), and an Italian would look for "Dolce, vita, la." But an English-language index will normally follow the British and American practice with respect to both sorting and capitalization.

 
 Posted:   Jul 16, 2014 - 8:44 AM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

My father has a lazy method of storing his DvD titles on their respective shelves. If "The" is the leading word of a title, he uses the next word to sort lexigographically. His 'A' to 'Z' compartments, however, do not uitilize strict ordering within. This is not really a problem because you just follow the line from left to right noting all titles as you go until you hit the one you're looking for (wherever it was last conveniently placed.) It has the added benefit that you may hit upon an interesting title unexpectedly while traversing the set incorporating the title you are searching for. If you look for something in strict order, you may find your goal sooner, however, the buzz of physically browsing with or without intent is lost.

A quick glance reveals that the longest contiguous list, I believe, is contained in the 'S' section.

 
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