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 Posted:   Jul 2, 2014 - 10:53 AM   
 By:   jackfu   (Member)

Jim, again I think you’ve touched on something to which a lot of us over 50 (some younger, such as yourself) can relate. I think much of it was due to folks of our parents’ generation, particularly those of the depression era. They grew up hard and fast, struggled in the depression, fought the war, etc., and sometimes viewed such things as childish. I remember vividly how my dad despised The Beatles (their lifestyles, not their music) and didn’t care much for, but tolerated my childhood fascination with them and their possible influence on me. Yet never did he say “Don’t play that crap!”, however he was known to say “Turn that crap down!”. wink

 
 Posted:   Jul 2, 2014 - 2:05 PM   
 By:   Adm Naismith   (Member)

I remember first watching them on PBS Sneak Previews and that was back in [1980] or there about. Used to think of them as the fat guy and the skinny guy. Always thought Siskel came off kind of snobby and Ebert seemed a little more in tune to what I would like.

Until I got older and saw a lot more movies, then I agreed more with Siskel.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 2, 2014 - 2:54 PM   
 By:   filmusicnow   (Member)

I remember first watching them on PBS Sneak Previews and that was back in [1980] or there about. Used to think of them as the fat guy and the skinny guy. Always thought Siskel came off kind of snobby and Ebert seemed a little more in tune to what I would like.

Until I got older and saw a lot more movies, then I agreed more with Siskel.


I was irritated when Siskel referred to Quincy Jones "as the most creative film composer" when they were talking about "Listen Up: The Lives Of Quincy Jones". Neither of them knew anything about film music.

 
 Posted:   Jul 2, 2014 - 4:34 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Siskel and Ebert interesting enough became very similar critics over time. Early on Ebert loved anything with special effects in it, while Siskel would fluff it off if the script wasn't any good. Then Siskel started to lighten up and gave thumbs up on some not so great sci fi and fantasy films. Meanwhile Ebert in his later years gave a thumbs down on many summer time special effects heavy movies.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 2, 2014 - 7:01 PM   
 By:   Ado   (Member)

Ebert gave a very positive review for the wretched Phantom Menace, never understood that.
On the other hand he also praised Dick Tracy, and I totally understood that.

 
 Posted:   Jul 3, 2014 - 5:12 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Jim, again I think you’ve touched on something to which a lot of us over 50 (some younger, such as yourself) can relate. I think much of it was due to folks of our parents’ generation, particularly those of the depression era. They grew up hard and fast, struggled in the depression, fought the war, etc., and sometimes viewed such things as childish. I remember vividly how my dad despised The Beatles (their lifestyles, not their music) and didn’t care much for, but tolerated my childhood fascination with them and their possible influence on me. Yet never did he say “Don’t play that crap!”, however he was known to say “Turn that crap down!”. wink

If only your father knew how those 1930 and '40s swing musicians and Hollywood actors lived their lives. wink

I've been watching a few S&E shows on YouTube from the early '80s. They didn't vehemently disagree as often until later, when they became even more famous.

 
 Posted:   Aug 1, 2014 - 4:14 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Hey zooba, you talked about this stuff back in 2010!

http://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=66326&forumID=7&archive=0

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2014 - 6:52 AM   
 By:   Clark Wayne   (Member)

Obviously these blokes weren't at all known in the UK, but on a general point I don't really understand why anyone cares about critics, especially these days.

I go by the old trope, 'opinions are like arseholes-everyone's got one'.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2014 - 4:08 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

I don't really think GENE SISKEL was serious. I know it might have been a little surprising at first but back then there were a lot of tensions going on with ethnic groups and all, unlike today where everyone loves everybody inside, but not outside.

 
 Posted:   Aug 4, 2014 - 11:32 AM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

Something you may not have known about Gene Siskel:

He was never particularly interested in reviewing movies. He went to movies, of course, like anybody, but he wasn't a huge fan of film.

He got his first taste of working as a journalist in the Army Reserves. He was a graduate of the Defense Information School when it was located at Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana (in Lawrence, Indiana). When he got out, he applied for a job at the Chicago Tribune.

His interests were in covering what he referred to as "the village beat". His editor, however, had other ideas and handed him, after one review, the movie critic job.

His passion for film evolved from having been handed on of the most lucrative of assignments.

I taught at the Defense Information School, 1979-84. Siskel came down one month as a guest speaker for all the classes in session.

 
 Posted:   Aug 5, 2014 - 6:52 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I learned much from your post, Ron.

 
 Posted:   May 5, 2016 - 12:16 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Did anyone here ever watch that LIFE ITSELF documentary? It's available for streaming on unholy Amazon. wink

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00T47ZG2C/ref=atv_feed_catalog?tag=imdb-amazonvideo-20

 
 Posted:   May 5, 2016 - 1:00 PM   
 By:   RoryR   (Member)

I always liked Siskel best. His opinions generally matched mine, so I'd take his recommendations. Ebert< I thought, always had a taste for, or perhaps tolerance of, junk food movies. I also thought Ebert could be a bitch sometimes.

One of the best things about the '80s was their show.

 
 Posted:   May 6, 2016 - 3:10 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Siskel and Ebert were imo at their best before the two of them got too famous, with Roger's public whiny bitch antics when Gene chose Jaye Davison as Best Supporting Actor for "The Crying Game" in their Oscar picks. I didn't watch Siskel and Ebert nearly as much as I previously had after that incident.

 
 Posted:   May 6, 2016 - 3:58 PM   
 By:   RoryR   (Member)

I remember when they were on PBS back in the late '70s. That's when their show was special. When it went syndicated, the first few years were good, then it started going downhill. I stopped watching in the very early '90s. But I miss they way they were in the beginning. There's nothing now.

My head almost explodes when I get into an argument with someone over the worth of a movie, and their only defense is its rating at Rotten Tomatoes!

Oh, Jesus...

 
 
 Posted:   May 6, 2016 - 6:14 PM   
 By:   jenkwombat   (Member)

My head almost explodes when I get into an argument with someone over the worth of a movie, and their only defense is its rating at Rotten Tomatoes!


I hear you, and agree completely.

Just as bad is, "But Leonard Maltin gives it 4 stars!" --- as if that's supposed to sway me in some way.

 
 
 Posted:   May 6, 2016 - 7:39 PM   
 By:   Jim Cleveland   (Member)

I always enjoyed entertaining dicks.... I know that can be intepretted many ways!big grinbig grinbig grinbig grinbig grin

 
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